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Old 07-03-2007, 10:01 PM   #1
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Door casing mouldings


Hi everyone, is MDF any good for door casing trim? I am looking for mouldings to do trim work on 7 doors, and I am seeing alot of MDF in the home centers. Thanks

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Old 07-04-2007, 02:08 PM   #2
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HH,

It's fine for door casing.

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Old 07-04-2007, 03:01 PM   #3
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Thanks Atlantic West, should I go with wood ones? The wood ones I saw the mouldings didn't have too much details, the MDF stuff did.
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Old 07-04-2007, 07:50 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by helpless handyman View Post
Thanks Atlantic West, should I go with wood ones? The wood ones I saw the mouldings didn't have too much details, the MDF stuff did.
That is entirely up to you. I would suggest that you do one door with wood, one door with MDF... caulk and paint to completion.

See what you think....
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Old 07-13-2007, 12:12 AM   #5
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I've used both but prefer wood. The mdf is not as stiff and requires more nails. Also the nails do a little more damage to the mdf ie. it leaves a raised portion around the hole. mdf also swells more if it gets a little damp, say in a bathroom beside the shower. mdf will break easier if you have to remove it. (especially the smaller stuff.) mdf is also dustier when you cut it. It is cheaper to buy though.
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Old 07-25-2007, 09:46 PM   #6
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HH,

It's fine for door casing.
Sorry Atlantic, but have to part ways with you on this one. The stuff is way to fragile for me for door casings. Every time a corner gets bumped by an object(furniture) going through the door it results in an ugly "explosion", instead of just a ding like you get with wood.

Like MDF for crown, and base boards in areas that do not have outside corners, but I always use wood for outside base corners. We do upper end work, and customers do not expect to have a 5/16" chunk missing from every corner they bump with their vacuum cleaner.

Maybe it is my imagination, but I find the quality of mdf mouldings to have gotten really poor compared to when it first became common. It seems it was much denser and contained a lot more resin or binder than todays stuff that you can delaminate by hand.
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Old 07-26-2007, 03:25 AM   #7
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Sorry Atlantic, but have to part ways with you on this one. The stuff is way to fragile for me for door casings. Every time a corner gets bumped by an object(furniture) going through the door it results in an ugly "explosion", instead of just a ding like you get with wood.

Like MDF for crown, and base boards in areas that do not have outside corners, but I always use wood for outside base corners. We do upper end work, and customers do not expect to have a 5/16" chunk missing from every corner they bump with their vacuum cleaner.

Maybe it is my imagination, but I find the quality of mdf mouldings to have gotten really poor compared to when it first became common. It seems it was much denser and contained a lot more resin or binder than todays stuff that you can delaminate by hand.
Trouble, no sarcasm intended, but:

I Didn't say I liked it, I Didn't say I preferred to use it, I didn't even say I recommended it over wood trim ...
Would I install MDF in a "high end job"? Heck no.
Do I think it is a hugely inferior product, No.
We prefer wood trimwork for the same reasons as you.

In some multi-resident complexes (repair work), it is what is installed and what we use for re-installations. If a home Owner gave it to us and wanted us to install it, we would.

The statement was that...... it could be used as door casing and trim work in general. Once painted, it looks fine. In terms of it's getting banged up, realize that even drywalled corners (especially vinyl) are softer than MDF and they take just as much beating from moving furniture and other things in certain households.

Funny thing is that we and others I have talked to, feel that MDF has actually gotten better in it's composition.
As mentioned, "for re-installs", we stopped using it for 15 years, because it was so brittle. We wouldn't go near the stuff.
Recently, in the past 3 years or so, we had to use it and feel that it has changed.
The change: we saw that it was not the same brittle junk it used to be. The newer material is much denser.
Even our custom cabinet and furniture guy uses it at times. He and I had a discussion about that. He thinks the current products are great and very durable due to their density - once prepped and painted...and he's been at it for over 40 years.

Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 07-26-2007 at 03:50 AM.
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Old 07-26-2007, 10:42 AM   #8
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My two cents, I am not a carpenter, but have been able to renovate my entire house with help from this forum like Alantic West. MDF has come along way, it doesn't give you that raised bump when you shoot nails into it, and you can get more detailed profiles, than the wood ones offer in a home center. I was just trying to get feedback from people who have used these materials. Thanks
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Old 07-28-2007, 10:11 PM   #9
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The difference here Atlantic was in our interpretation of the original post. I read his request as a recommnedation of good or not for door trim, not "if" it could be used for this application. My opinion is still "not by choice", but like you, I have used it in situations where it was required, albiet not happily. I don't have as big a problem with the quality of the sheet goods used for cabinet work, and use it often for paint grade raised panel stock, and even flat slab cabinet doors. I do not have the equipment to make the one piece raised panel, rail and stile mdf cabinet doors, but we order them from a local cabinet shop for entertainment center bases and such, and are satisfied.
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Old 07-28-2007, 11:40 PM   #10
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The wood ones would be too fargile.I would not recommend it to U since they wont come for longer that an year.HEcnce go for something mettalic.
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Old 07-29-2007, 07:08 PM   #11
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The wood ones would be too fargile.I would not recommend it to U since they wont come for longer that an year.HEcnce go for something mettalic.
The mods may delete this one for "unecessary cruelty", but I'll take the chance.

After reading some of his other replies and then this one, I must ask.... drugs or alcohol induced?

Last edited by troubleseeker; 07-29-2007 at 07:14 PM.
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Old 07-30-2007, 03:20 PM   #12
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i second troubleseeker on that one....what's up with him?
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Old 08-03-2007, 06:32 PM   #13
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Hi guys, should I put any caulk or liquid nail on the casing before I install it onto the frame and sheetrock and shoot nails onto it? Or should I just shoot nails onto it, and then caulk around where needed? Thanks for the tips
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Old 08-03-2007, 06:49 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by helpless handyman View Post
Hi guys, should I put any caulk or liquid nail on the casing before I install it onto the frame and sheetrock and shoot nails onto it? Or should I just shoot nails onto it, and then caulk around where needed? Thanks for the tips
just shoot and caulk....
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Old 08-03-2007, 09:11 PM   #15
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Thanks Atlantic

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