DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   Cutting Trim and Hanging Doors (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/cutting-trim-hanging-doors-89350/)

ws450r 12-11-2010 07:32 PM

Cutting Trim and Hanging Doors
 
1. What are your all's secrets for measuring and cutting trim around windows and doors? No matter how exact I measure, it seems like I am getting a little spacing where it meets at the angle. I did cut it once with the old trim as a guide, and it came out decent. Guess I could do that all the time if I had to.

2. Advice for hanging doors? I laid the old door on top of the new one, marked out the holes, but the latch still didn't line up very well. Also the hinged were off a bit. Still shuts and latches, but not as easy as the previous.

BigJim 12-11-2010 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ws450r (Post 549657)
1. What are your all's secrets for measuring and cutting trim around windows and doors? No matter how exact I measure, it seems like I am getting a little spacing where it meets at the angle. I did cut it once with the old trim as a guide, and it came out decent. Guess I could do that all the time if I had to.

2. Advice for hanging doors? I laid the old door on top of the new one, marked out the holes, but the latch still didn't line up very well. Also the hinged were off a bit. Still shuts and latches, but not as easy as the previous.

Cutting the door and window trim. First using a combination square set it so it will mark 1/8 inch. Mark your corners of the jambs with the combo square making an 1/8 inch margin on the side and on the header of the jamb also. Where these two lines intersect will be where the trim corners will be. Cut the side pieces of your trim on a 45, nail both sides in place. Cut both ends of the header piece on a 45 making it 1 inch longer than it should be.

Lay the header piece in place with the right end over lapping the right side piece. Bed the left side in while holding the right end up flush with the top of the right side. If the left side of the header piece does not fit just trim it until it does fit on just the left side for now. Now do the same on the right end, if there is a gap, cut the right end until it does fit. Notice you have moved the angle of your miter saw to trim the right end, leave it in that position.

Now lay the header piece back in place with the left side bedded in and mark your right end of the header piece on the top edge to length. Cut the right end of the header piece on the mark but leave the mark just ever so slightly. In other words cut the header piece about a 1/32 inch or a 1/64 inch longer than where you made the mark. Lay the header piece back in place and if it doesn't go all the way down into place, tap it and it will go in tight.

Here is another problem you will encounter over time. When fitting the header piece you will see that the back side of your cut is touching and there is a gap on the front edge. Judy make the trim fit as described above but once you have the saw set to make the correct trim cut, lay the trim down on the miter saw table and raise the end up that you just trim cut.

You can lay your pencil or anything under the trim to raise the end up you want to cut. This will make a back cut, in other words it will cut some of the meat out of the back edge of that angle and will let the top of the angle close up. The amount you raise the trim up to cut will depend on how much of a back cut is needed. Notice that the angle is changed a little so be sure to bed your header piece back in to be sure you have a good fit before cutting to final length.

I hope I explained this so you can understand it, I'm not good at explaining.

dadflynn 12-11-2010 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ws450r (Post 549657)
1. What are your all's secrets for measuring and cutting trim around windows and doors? No matter how exact I measure, it seems like I am getting a little spacing where it meets at the angle. I did cut it once with the old trim as a guide, and it came out decent. Guess I could do that all the time if I had to.

2. Advice for hanging doors? I laid the old door on top of the new one, marked out the holes, but the latch still didn't line up very well. Also the hinged were off a bit. Still shuts and latches, but not as easy as the previous.

What type of saw are you using to make your cuts?
How are you cutting your hinges? Are you using any kind of jig? How well did your old door fit prior to starting?

Jay123 12-11-2010 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ws450r (Post 549657)
1. No matter how exact I measure, it seems like I am getting a little spacing where it meets at the angle.


Narrowed down to this statement (and with some pics if possible), this might be easily solved...this part...with pics.

Possibly, once this problem is solved...other problems would be solved as well.

Some times it's simple, some times it's not.

wombosi 12-12-2010 05:37 PM

#1 rule for all trimwork:
MARK IN PLACE!

this means, you can use your tape to cut the piece an inch or two longer than needed. but then hold the actual piece in the place where it will go, and mark the cut location with a pencil.

and yes, lay out your reveals with a combination square first.

as for the door, not sure what to tell you. sounds like you had good ideas, but didn't quite do something quite right.

TheDoorGuy 12-13-2010 07:00 AM

Hi there,
Make sure that your saw is adjusted correctly....
They do need to be checked periodically.

As to marking the hinges: After getting new door sized to fit in
the opening, I like to shim it into place and mark the top and bottom
of each hinge with a razor knife. While you have door in opening,
mark the location of lock also.

This is hard to explain but check the backset of your hinge...
That would be the distance from the edge of the hinge to the edge
of the door where it is mortised. If that distance is too wide, the door
will bind against the door stop.

TheDoorGuy

canadaclub 12-13-2010 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by schmolze (Post 550144)
#1 rule for all trimwork:
MARK IN PLACE!

this means, you can use your tape to cut the piece an inch or two longer than needed. but then hold the actual piece in the place where it will go, and mark the cut location with a pencil.

.

Yep! The only way to go:thumbsup:

mrgins 12-14-2010 03:58 PM

For the door hinge placement, I put the door in the hole with a 1/8" spacer at the top, and then hold it up tight to the frame at the top and the hinge side. Then I mark/transfer the hinge locations, take the door down and use a router guide to rout out the hinges. Putting the door in the hole also eliminates any question as to how the hinges should be mounted. After the door is hung, I adjust the latch side jamb to the door and then install the handle. Don't try to figure strikeplate location until the door is hung and the handles are installed

chrisBC 12-28-2010 02:54 AM

For the trim-make sure you are using a good finishing blade first off.

I always start with the header piece-if you cut and nail the side pieces first and leave the header till last, it will be much harder to get a flawless fit at your corners-your measurement will have to be deadly accurate.

This way, if the side pieces are say a 16th short, that gap can go against the floor where it will not be noticable.

Also keep in mind most casing has some "flex" to it. Make the mitre pretty and nail it, don't worry about the bottom reveal on the doorjam. Then work your way down, nailing the casing to the jamb at the desired reveal. I find in most cases this works very well for myself.

For hanging doors, I always mark for the latch when the door is hung in the opening, it has never failed. I don't go off the old door for this like I do for the hinges. For the hinges, just be very careful, accurate. Use a sharp pencil, double check your work.

hope this helps, just takes practice.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved