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StrandedPirate 11-10-2012 02:18 PM

Cutting board height-wise
 
I'm re-doing some kitchen cabinets and I've created a panel insert that will simply glue to the the exiting cabinet door's flat front face to make it look better.

The problem is that the wood for the panel started off as 3/4 in height and I need to saw off 6/16'ths inch from the bottom in the height direction so the panel sits into the door and can be blended in seamlessly. My table saw won't make it to the halfway mark because the wood is 12" wide. I don't own a bandsaw which is what I'm thinking would be the best thing to use but I do own a lot of other tools.

Any suggestions on ways to make this cut?


This is the cabinet door:

http://i860.photobucket.com/albums/a...inet-alone.png

The panel insert laying in the door:

http://i860.photobucket.com/albums/a...t-w-insert.png

Panel close-up with a line indicating the cut:

http://i860.photobucket.com/albums/a...t-close-up.png

Keith Mathewson 11-10-2012 03:03 PM

Before you start do yourself a real favor and read an article on frame & panel construction with particular interest in the function of a floating panel.

joecaption 11-10-2012 03:37 PM

6/16th:eek:
Guess you mean 3/8"
About the only way to do it would be with a planer.
But what may end up happening is the piece will curl up.

hand drive 11-11-2012 08:41 AM

not sure of your skill level but a skil saw would cut that angle, hold the door stationary somehow and just keep an eye on the blade or fasten/clamp a guide to the door for the base of the saw to ride against...

Hammer450R 11-11-2012 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1049525)
not sure of your skill level but a skil saw would cut that angle, hold the door stationary somehow and just keep an eye on the blade or fasten/clamp a guide to the door for the base of the saw to ride against...

Say whut?

Hammer450R 11-11-2012 09:15 AM

I would pop the old panel out and install the new panel.

Ahh nevermind i see it is smaller than the old panel.

user1007 11-11-2012 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1049525)
not sure of your skill level but a skil saw would cut that angle, hold the door stationary somehow and just keep an eye on the blade or fasten/clamp a guide to the door for the base of the saw to ride against...

Hugh? I've never seen a jigsaw blade the width or length of cabinet door. And they wobble. And what angle?:no:

Joe is right. The way to shave an even layer off a flat panel is with a pass or two through a planer if you have access to one. My Dad was a cabinet maker and was able to shave wide and long doors with a handplane. Not me! Nice planers are heavy and expensive but they make weekend warrior models that should suit your purposes since you are not doing production work or cabinetry for a living. This one is probably not capable of taking wide enough for material for your purposes but you get the idea.

http://sawdustmaking.com/Planer/60270-1.jpg

hand drive 11-11-2012 09:29 AM

forgot to mention, when using the skil saw add some painters tape to the underside of the base of the saw so it does not layer the door with aluminum marks. It is what I call an undercut and I've done thousands of them,that cut could be doen in less than one minute, the angle does not need to be exact, it is going to be hidden out of sight , the angle just needs to be made to clear the profiled panel of the other door...

user1007 11-11-2012 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hand drive (Post 1049555)
forgot to mention, when using the skil saw add some painters tape to the underside of the base of the saw so it does not layer the door with aluminum marks. It is what I call an undercut and I've done thousands of them,that cut could be doen in less than one minute, the angle does not need to be exact, it is going to be hidden out of sight , the angle just needs to be made to clear the profiled panel of the other door...

Double hugh:eek: The OP is trying to shave a fixed amount of surface of the back face of a flat panel so it fits flush within his cabinet door. :eek: What do jigsaws and cutting angles have to do with this? The panel fits. It is just too thick!!!

However, I think I get what you are suggesting and that he consider cutting an angled profile in what he has down to the level of the surrounding frame. I guess it could work but might look goofy. But with that approach, wouldn't two minutes with a router profile bit be more accurate than a jigsaw?

hand drive 11-11-2012 10:41 AM

^ Oh What! I thought the angled inset profile of the current door was interfering with the way the new piece sat on it and needed a tiny bit of angle added to the backside but see now that the entire backside of the door add on needs to be shaved... hmm, greater tools than skilsaws will certainly be needed

Hammer450R 11-12-2012 07:55 AM

Thanks Hand drive, I know your posts are usually good info, I knew you had to be missing the point there lol


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