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Old 11-20-2006, 08:20 AM   #1
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Cut-N-Crown method


Has anyone ever used the Cut-N-Crown jigs for cutting crown molding? What are your thoughts?

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Old 12-24-2007, 01:23 PM   #2
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Cut-N-Crown method


I used the Cut n' Crown jig recently to install crown molding in a bathroom. Worked great. I also used the Easy Coper jigs for coping, and the combination of the two sped up the job significantly and I am very pleased with the end result.

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Old 01-28-2009, 07:31 PM   #3
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Cut-N-Crown method


I can see the cut n' crown makes the saw setup a little quicker than the usual method of just fastening a guide piece on the saw table. Is that worth the money? Your decision.

Two tools well worth the money, however are the Easy Cope guide set and the sliding crown holders made by Crown.

Since it is almost an impossibility to find an inside corner that is perfect, when you factor in two walls and both sides of the ceiling, I consider coping the ONLY way to go. And the Easy Cope guides make quick and (pardon the pun) EASY work of the coping job. About ten or fifteen seconds to a very smooth and accurate cope. They also make a straight guide for coping base.

And Crown's plastic angled molding hangers are just brilliant. Hands free molding adjustment and installation.
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:09 PM   #4
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Cut-N-Crown method


I've had the Cut-N-Crown system for a couple years and have used it extensively. I saw it demonstrated at a woodworking show and ordered it immediately. Before having it, I was one of those people that ordered a couple extra sticks of crown to compensate for my inevitable errors...I have done a lot of crown but don't do it often enough to be proficient at it without waaay too much thought. Using the Cut-N-Crown blocks I don't screw up.

I bought all three blocks with the corner angle finder, which is mighty handy even in rooms that are supposedly square. The set came with a DVD that does a really good job of explaining how to utilize it for every angle or scenario you can run into.

I used to use crown stops on my saw and haven't used them once since getting the blocks.

I really recommend getting all three blocks, because a lot of crown mouldings aren't 45 degree spring angle.
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:43 PM   #5
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Cut-N-Crown method


I do have one question about the Cut n' Crown. How do you compensate for molding that may be thicker at the bottom than at the top when you reverse the jig, and place the molding in the jig, face down?

On most molding, the tops and bottoms are about the same thickness. And I can see no real problem there. But on the really ornate (expensive) pieces, the lower portion is often very thick compared to the top. Doesn't laying the molding on the jig, face down, throw off the angle...... since you already cut the other side of the corner with the BACK lying against the jig?
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:32 PM   #6
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Cut-N-Crown method


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Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
I do have one question about the Cut n' Crown. How do you compensate for molding that may be thicker at the bottom than at the top when you reverse the jig, and place the molding in the jig, face down?

On most molding, the tops and bottoms are about the same thickness. And I can see no real problem there. But on the really ornate (expensive) pieces, the lower portion is often very thick compared to the top. Doesn't laying the molding on the jig, face down, throw off the angle...... since you already cut the other side of the corner with the BACK lying against the jig?
Great question, and the simple answer is a thin furring strip stacked onto the face of the jig. Luckily our crown molding jig has a large flat surface to work with and if you are performing an install that has some larger more detailed crown moulding we work perfect for it. But if the face is uneven we use some two sided tape(or temp rubber glue) and stick the necessary thickness wood strip on the face of our jig. Nothing permanent and make sure it is not the foam type two sided tape, you will not want any movement. Sometimes you can rest the strip in the jig on our lower ledge without any adhesive, depending on your molding and its profile.

As you all know there are thousands of variations of crown molding, we work perfect for 99% of them. This is an example of the 1% you need to perform just a little customization, but its minor and we still work great!

If you ever need help though, give us a call, our number is on the top of our website: http://cutncrown.com -Thanks Everyone!
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:54 PM   #7
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Cut-N-Crown method


I've used one of these for years, so simple no directions needed, there's even pictures right on it showing everything you need to know.
http://www.amazon.com/Bench-Dog-10-0.../dp/B000OR8JJ8

This simple tool will tell you exactly what degree to cut the odd angle, it gives it in single and double cut.
http://www.amazon.com/Starrett-505A-.../dp/B000B8N0SU

Last edited by joecaption; 08-03-2012 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 08-04-2012, 03:30 AM   #8
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Cut-N-Crown method


Usually when you have a jig that is adjustable that means there is probability of error. We have no adjustments, therefore providing a stable surface that does not rely on any mechanical movements that can fail or introduce some degree of error. With our broad base and large surface we provide the most stable and accurate jig. That relates back to a perfect cut every time, and that gives you a perfect crown molding installation every time.

Our miter gauge is the most reliable and cost competitive miter gauge product on the market. Please, take a look at the comparison: https://cutncrown.com/all_products.php

The miter gauge can sell separately or with our kits. With it and our crown molding jig you simply take an angle measurement of your corner(inside or out), divide it in two and that is your angle cut on the crown molding. Cut, install, and you are done. Thanks!
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Old 08-04-2012, 05:42 AM   #9
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Cut-N-Crown method


Cutncrown---You are crossing the line on what is allowed as far as 'self promoting' goes---Moderator---

I am going to let this ride for a bit,however, because you are being very helpful---on a subject that our members are interested in---

I was a contract trim guy for a period of time and have installed loads of crown---I looked at your product and I do think it has merit.

Please be careful about posting links to your product-----there is a line between helpful and spamming---Be the helpful type---Mike---Moderator----
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Old 08-04-2012, 07:13 AM   #10
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Cut-N-Crown method


I've laid crown down flat on the compound miter saw and cut it that way for years. minor adjustments are just a quick turn of the saw base or an adjustment of the angle of the blade away... you can make any custom cut you want and need this way

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