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Old 12-31-2010, 01:46 PM   #46
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Some very nice stair work in this thread. I'm very impressed.

Do you guys laminate your handrails also? or do you use the tangent method with solid pieces?

I've got a book that tries to teach the tangent handrail method and It just makes me go .
I used to laminate my curved rail from 1/4" laminations and then bend them to my forms on pitch. After they dry i would scrape them clean then profile by hand with a router. Now they have most popular rail profiles that made in about 8 layers with the pofile on the outer 2 sides. The pieces all lock together. All you need to do is glue and clamp them to a form. They also sell the negative part of the rail profile (usually a wax-like material) which makes clamping much easier.
Carved wreaths are much more involved. I have one of those tangent handrail books and yes they are difficult to decipher.Getting the basic shape is one thing. Getting a profile on it is sometimes just as hard.

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Old 12-31-2010, 03:07 PM   #47
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thanks
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Old 12-31-2010, 04:11 PM   #48
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I used to laminate my curved rail from 1/4" laminations and then bend them to my forms on pitch. After they dry i would scrape them clean then profile by hand with a router. Now they have most popular rail profiles that made in about 8 layers with the pofile on the outer 2 sides. The pieces all lock together. All you need to do is glue and clamp them to a form. They also sell the negative part of the rail profile (usually a wax-like material) which makes clamping much easier.
Carved wreaths are much more involved. I have one of those tangent handrail books and yes they are difficult to decipher.Getting the basic shape is one thing. Getting a profile on it is sometimes just as hard.
I have one of the tangent rail books also, it would take a genius to understand all of that. Curved and spiral rails aren't hard to understand but rails with open sides that are straight for 4 or 5 treads then you have winders and back to straight the rest of the way will make you scratch your head a little, a bending rail will not work on them as they have compound curves.
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Old 12-31-2010, 07:18 PM   #49
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I just wanted to say the staircases shown in this thread are absolutely phenomenal. How do you guys get the wood to curl like that out of curiosity? Is there some process or what? I'm just an admirer inquiring. Fantastic work.
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:38 PM   #50
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Hello does anybody have the videos of Keith Mathewson curved stairs ?? .where can I find them on the net ?
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:40 PM   #51
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Here you are David if you look at the top of the page it will show all the other vids.
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:55 PM   #52
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Here you are David if you look at the top of the page it will show all the other vids.

Keith it looks like you have two templates for the stringer wide side and narrow ?
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Old 01-11-2011, 08:59 PM   #53
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David,

That stair took something in the neighborhood of 6 templates. You will find that as your inside stringer radius gets tighter (that one was 7 1/2") that the kerf cuts have to be closer together and as such they break easily. With the outside stringer some will be much larger than others.
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Old 01-11-2011, 09:02 PM   #54
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David,

That stair took something in the neighborhood of 6 templates. You will find that as your inside stringer radius gets tighter (that one was 7 1/2") that the kerf cuts have to be closer together and as such they break easily. With the outside stringer some will be much larger than others.

Thanks Keith, a pitcher is a thousand words >>
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:08 PM   #55
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Just thought I would donate this math formula to the conversation. This would be for a 1/4 circle curved strairs with 13 treads. Thats where the 90 degrees and number 13 come from so you can change these two numbers for your specific application. R = radius.

R X 2 X pi (22/7) X 90 degrees divided by 360 degrees divided by 13 treads

Use this to calculate the length of tread for the outside and inside stringers. Draw it on the floor.
Are you going to tackle this project? Will it be self supporting? What does it require for a hand railing?
I always cut my treads on a table saw with a taper jig and I use 3/8 plywood for the stringers 5 plys. 1/8 mahogany door skins make a good backing if you want to apply a veneer to the stringer and give it the solid wood appearance. If you really want to test your talents finish the handrailing with a declining tangent scroll based on a hyperbolic spiral. I can walk you through that one but you will need a band saw and free standing belt sander to ease the job along. Time and a great deal of patience will be an asset.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:15 PM   #56
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Another question. Housed or open stringer? Open is much easier.
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Old 01-14-2011, 05:25 PM   #57
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Just thought I would donate this math formula to the conversation. This would be for a 1/4 circle curved strairs with 13 treads. Thats where the 90 degrees and number 13 come from so you can change these two numbers for your specific application. R = radius.

R X 2 X pi (22/7) X 90 degrees divided by 360 degrees divided by 13 treads

Use this to calculate the length of tread for the outside and inside stringers. Draw it on the floor.
Are you going to tackle this project? Will it be self supporting? What does it require for a hand railing?
I always cut my treads on a table saw with a taper jig and I use 3/8 plywood for the stringers 5 plys. 1/8 mahogany door skins make a good backing if you want to apply a veneer to the stringer and give it the solid wood appearance. If you really want to test your talents finish the handrailing with a declining tangent scroll based on a hyperbolic spiral. I can walk you through that one but you will need a band saw and free standing belt sander to ease the job along. Time and a great deal of patience will be an asset.
thanks do you have any photos ? and yes I have all the tools ..
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:11 PM   #58
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David f---Thanks for getting this thread started---I enjoy learning about complicated stairs.-Mike-
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Old 01-14-2011, 06:35 PM   #59
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David f---Thanks for getting this thread started---I enjoy learning about complicated stairs.-Mike-
look at Keith Mathewson site on
this guy is good
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Old 01-14-2011, 09:58 PM   #60
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I'll be back---Great,helpful videos--thanks.--Now back to the movie--

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