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Old 02-25-2011, 12:22 AM   #16
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[QUOTE
I think to laminate the panels to wood forms as suggested is unnessary for paint grade work, and will add many unneeded $ to the price. Besides needing to build the forms for laminating; you will also need to make matching cradles for rolling the curved panels in for shaping.[/QUOTE]

There are many ways to do things and your approach and mine certainly different. Would I be correct in assuming you've never done any vacuum bagging? It is the most efficient method I've found for doing this kind of work. The form can be made in under an hour, I'm wondering how the time it takes to make the form would balance against the additional time to fill and sand.

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Old 02-25-2011, 08:51 AM   #17
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True but his application is a "juliet balcony", which means it is inside. To clarify ; it is a shallow balcony, generally radiused, that allows persons in an upstairs room to walk out and look down into an adjacent multistory room, such as a den or great room through a set of french doors.
Thanks for clarifying that. That's a term I'd never heard of.
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:56 PM   #18
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no. I have never used vacuum bagging before. I have seen it used in small applications before. Most of my radiused work is laminated to a form and clamped with cauls. My biggest question i would say is do i make the curved panels solid and then make a cradle for them to ride in and run on the shaper.
or should i make the panels out of wacky wood and run the profile 1st, then bend it around the form.
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Old 02-25-2011, 10:27 PM   #19
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We most likely all do things the way we have been taught, so trying to bend to a predefined profile doesn't seem like a good idea to me. Doesn't mean it won't work though...
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:28 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
We most likely all do things the way we have been taught, so trying to bend to a predefined profile doesn't seem like a good idea to me. Doesn't mean it won't work though...
You would need to profile after, not before bending, as it will change the profile.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:43 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Keith Mathewson View Post
[QUOTE
There are many ways to do things and your approach and mine certainly different. Would I be correct in assuming you've never done any vacuum bagging? It is the most efficient method I've found for doing this kind of work. The form can be made in under an hour, I'm wondering how the time it takes to make the form would balance against the additional time to fill and sand.
It is my experience that most smaller cabinet shops do not have the equipment. Even though it is not terribly expensive, most shops do very little curved work to invest in it. I agree that the laminating form would not be too labor intensive, but I feel there is an great chance for error when shaping the curved panels. Filling with light weight spackling (which sands like butter) and a quality primer should handle the imperfections with two applications IMO. A shop guy with curved work experience could probably make the time difference a wash, but otherwise, I think the fill/sand will take the time hands down.

Like you say, different approaches. I am thinking of how I would accomplish this on a job site; with the least amount of room for error(shaping curved panels); whereas you seem to be thinking from your perspective in a well equiped and experienced cabinet shop.
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Old 02-28-2011, 09:52 PM   #22
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You would need to profile after, not before bending, as it will change the profile.
Technically speaking, agreed. But in this situation we are dealing with large gently curved panels, not moulding profiles that would have to match at mitered joints. I doubt that I could discern the difference, even knowing that it was there; and as "troubleseeker" implies, I am am an anal PITA.
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Old 02-28-2011, 10:12 PM   #23
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Troubleseeker,

The guy works in a stairshop, which must mean that he works with curved work nearly every day. I have to wonder what kind of stairshop doesn't have a few vacuum bags around the place? These guys have to be doing curved risers at the very least.
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Old 03-01-2011, 10:23 PM   #24
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Your going to have fun this one. Will the back be visable? Draw it out Make a jig to laminate it on. Equal strips of wood with beveled edges. You will need a curved cradle to feed it into the shaper or router table.
Shaper Handbook Cliffe & Holtz Linden Publishing Lots of good reference material

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