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Old 01-29-2009, 06:21 PM   #16
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Crown Moulding and nailing


Willie T,

Gotchya. One thing I can say is that a 2X4 would not work. I tried it. The spring angle was too small and would not fit nicely on the 2X4. So, I didn't go that route. I went another route with smaller nailing block and I nailed those into the studs at the corner of the ceiling and wall. Those worked just fine and wasn't at all a big deal to cut.

I put up the some of the crown moulding (after we got the good mixture of stain to match the other trim in the house.). It looks excellent. Just an FYI--> I have a brad nailer and a finish nailer (borrowed from a friend). I first tried the brad nailer on one of the crown mouldings. It nailed directly into the nailing blocks that I put up. I did the second one with the finish nailer. The brad nailer worked just as good because they are both very sturdy.

So far things are going well. I'm going to hold onto the finish nailer for a just-in-case situation but it hasn't been seen yet. :-)

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Old 01-12-2010, 07:43 PM   #17
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Crown Moulding and nailing


FYI, I am a newbie and am using a 15 gauge nailer, but one of the finish carpenty gurus, Gary Katz, says in a dvd on mastering crown moulding that he uses 18 gauge 2 1/8" brads for light crown. I beleive by light he means no bigger than 4 1/2". (I think it shoots 2 1/8" nails, may be 2""
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:03 PM   #18
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Crown Moulding and nailing


Along with what Willie said, if you are going to use the triangle rip, don't run them all the way into the inside corners. Stop about 6" short. If you run all the way in, it will interfere with your inside corner joint, if you are coping like you should be. If you place a piece of crown into the inside corner of a framing square, you can see how much space is left for your triangle piece. Just make it a little smaller in both directions so it doesn't actually touch the back of the crown.
Mike Hawkins


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Originally Posted by Willie T View Post
Ponch gave you a good tip. Not only is cutting up little nailer blocks a pain, but getting them into place is sometimes aggravating. A long, beveled 2 x 4 is the way to go. This serves exactly the same purpose as the hundreds of little blocks, is faster to make, and can be nailed into place easier. It also gives you the very well appreciated ability to nail and/or splice your molding anywhere you feel like it.

Just make sure your 2 x 4 is shallow of where the molding will lie. You don't want it shoving the molding out of line anywhere.
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Old 01-12-2010, 08:30 PM   #19
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Crown Moulding and nailing


Klawman,

I valued very much on several occasions what others say here. However, with this situation for me in order to reduce costs. I had to say it but I disagreed with them and went went without the nail gun and used a Brad nailer.

I used, I believe a 1/2x1 piece of wood on the spring angle. (I say 1/2x1 but it's been a while and I can't remember the measurement exactly (it's not like I can look either.)) But I used that on the spring angle and the brad nailer with the brad nails on the moulding.

In some cases, I did not use or really need to use the the wood for the spring angle. It all worked out perfectly with the brad nailer. It looks beautiful and I did not have one problem at all.

Well, let me back up...the biggest problem I had was NOT with the nailing but with the cuts for the crown moulding. It took a few times in the beginning and went through some extra moulding wood just to make sure I had the right way of cutting and all but I got it. It took a little bit of time but I got it.

I have to say one of the toughest issues I had was that I had 1 (yes, 1) corner that was a bullnose corner and went to a 90 degress about 7 inches later. That piece right that was a real PITA because one side had to be the 22 degrees and the other for the 90. But I got that one too, over some trial and error.

All-in-all, it looks beatiful and very supporting. The use of the brad nailer worked as I expected with the wood for the spring angle.

I have received many a compliment on it.

Keep in mind, the information provided on this diychatroom has always been superb! I disagreed and wanted to try what I was getting at knowing and fully understanding it was at my own risk and had not panned out I would have definitely scrapped what I was thinking/doing and gone more with what was mentioned here. It turns not that everything panned out the way I was thinking and it worked as expected and looks beautiful.

Either way, it will just take patience. :-) Good luck on that endeavor!!!
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:35 PM   #20
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Crown Moulding and nailing


It sounds like you did a good job. The problem is not with the initial product, but how well it holds over time and that can depend on many variables such as your local weather and humidity. Many report having no problem with an 18 gauge, but sometimes it shows up in a season or more.


15 and 16 gauges are not only heavier nails, but their heads are shaped differently than a brad. Those heads tend to grip better than brad heads. The nails usually are coated with glue as opposed to brads. They also come greater lengths.

One way to increase the holding power of any nail is to cross nail at alternating angles.

Note my post about an expert using an 18 gauge brad to hang lighter crown.
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Old 01-12-2010, 10:06 PM   #21
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Yep, understand.

What I did with the 1/2x1" wood is put that almost the length of the crown moulding. I nailed those to the the studs of the wall at the corner between the ceiling and the wall. Then I put the crown moulding over that and put the nail between through the center of the crown moulding and had it go into the 1/2X1 that was already nailed on. So the angle of the crown moulding provided enough room for the 1/2x1 to go in behind it. When I nailed the crown moulding to the 1/2x1 that made it very secure and have every belief that it will last over time.
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Old 01-12-2010, 10:52 PM   #22
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Crown Moulding and nailing


Glad it turned out so well.

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