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Old 12-13-2005, 08:53 PM   #1
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Crown Moulding again


I plan on installing crown throughout the entire house and I am really raring to go. I prefabbed 5 inside corners and 1 outside with my Power mitre set at 33.85 degrees beval and 31.25 degrees mitre according to my manual. I glued the pieces together using a tru 90 degree jig I made up. I also bevelled the ends to 45 degrees to accept the straight piece. I also made up som chanforred peices to use where there is no joist running with it. I have trie coping before with little luck, Is ther any secret to helping me understand this trade a little better. Thanks again
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Old 12-13-2005, 10:04 PM   #2
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Crown Moulding again


Just out of curiosity, how long is each side of your prefabbed corner? I don't think I would like to have a joint that close to a corner if at all avoidable. You are also taking a big risk having perfect 90's...it very rarely happens.

I also don't see where this saves time, even if it works. You have an extra joint on each side and you still have to put the corner together nicely. Let me know how this goes. I can wrap a corner fairly quickly and you'd think it was one piece of wood

On the coping, you make your regular mitre just like you were doing an inside 45. This gives you your silloutte. Using your coping saw, cut along the side of the finish line. This is hard to describe without pictures but since I don't have any crown to put up tonight, no such fortune.

Backcut with the coping saw. That means don't cut at 90 degrees to the trim, angle the coping saw so that you are making the finish side pointy. Be sure the blade is installed so that it cuts on the 'pull' stroke and have the handle on the unfinished face of the trim. That will insure that you won't splinter the trim when cutting.

On your 'bevelled' pieces (assuming here that you're talking about a scarf joint) did you pay attention to which direction the angle (bevel) is pointing? These cuts should be made so that when you walk into the room, the joint is invisible. This means that the piece closest to the observer is laying over top of the farther away piece, if that makes sense.
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