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Old 09-16-2007, 10:56 AM   #1
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Help needed;

For a first time installer, (Me...) Which method is better, or would give better results for cutting Crown Molding, standing the molding upside-down against the Miter stand, or laying it flat, and figuring out the crown spring angle, then adjusting the blade tilt angle?

Also, are the angles listed on this site pretty reliable?

http://www.extremehowto.com/xh/artic...ticle_id=60354

Im thinking from the research that i've done that standing up the crown is easier? I've read a bunch, and looked at some video's on the web, so i'm not just asking without looking into it first.

Any input much appreciated!

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Old 09-16-2007, 01:18 PM   #2
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


your on the right track with what your thinking

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Old 09-16-2007, 03:28 PM   #3
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


I've found for myself, laying it flat was easier once the angles are figured out. It's just without a good solid jig with arms, laying the piece flat was easier to ensure the cuts were at the proper angles... trying to hold a 8 feet length of wobbly crown on the mitre table is pretty tricky without a jig...

And definitely cope all inside corners, worth the extra effort...
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Old 09-16-2007, 04:06 PM   #4
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


if ceiling plane is flat: cut the crown 45/ resting on foot and the other 45/ on back guide...angle on your mitersaw 45 , then cope as needed. Watch your angles. measure twice and picture it in your head four times.

Good to have a little help holding the other end or set up a rest on long boards. Great time to bond with the kids, even one of the neighbor kids, or use son-in-law and wife as last resort.

If your going to paint, relax ... thats why they invented caulk.

Last edited by Big Bob; 09-16-2007 at 04:08 PM.
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Old 09-17-2007, 02:22 AM   #5
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


What kind of saw do you have? Compound or miter only?

If you have a compound laying the crown flat is by far easier and most accurate as the table fence is your rest. If you stand it up your saw will need crown stops. You can't stand it straight up against the fence. The fence is the ceiling and the table is the wall, the crown must lay at an angle just like it does when installed. You shouldn't have to cope anything.

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Last edited by Stubbie; 09-17-2007 at 02:31 AM.
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Old 09-17-2007, 05:17 AM   #6
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Since you mentioned laying flat I will assume you have either a scms or a cms. If I were you I would lay flat and use the appropriate bevel miter for your crowns step angle.
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Old 09-17-2007, 05:32 PM   #7
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


That's a good link.

I wish I'd seen this post two weeks ago when we were installing crown molding. I invented new swear words that day.
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Old 09-18-2007, 10:42 AM   #8
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Problem with cutting flat is that it is much harder to get length right. Investing a bit of time in setting up a stop to hold molding in front, preventing it from sliding down the fence will make things a lot easier.

And for inside corners, I am yet to see an inside miter looking remotely as good as a cope - especially 4-5 months later.
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Old 09-19-2007, 01:04 AM   #9
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubbie View Post
What kind of saw do you have? Compound or miter only?
Stubbie
Im using a Ryobi compound Miter saw. 10 inches, i think.
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Old 09-19-2007, 01:08 AM   #10
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


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Originally Posted by scorrpio View Post

And for inside corners, I am yet to see an inside miter looking remotely as good as a cope - especially 4-5 months later.

Im pretty much all inside corners for this project... I don't get the whole coping thing tho. The way i see it, if you are going to shave away the angle that you created with a coping saw, what's the point of cutting it at a specific angle anyway?

I think im probably missing something as far as 'coping' goes, but from what i've read and seen on the 'web, you cut a mitered angle, then trace a pencil mark on the inside facing edge of the crown, then shave it away at that mark with the coping saw? This seems to defeat te whole reason for cutting a precise angle to begin with. Forgive my ignorance if im missing something obvious...
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Old 09-19-2007, 02:48 AM   #11
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Coping helps with expansion and movement, it really is a cleaner look and finish... but caulk fixes most everything, it's one of those things that make the finish that much better... but if you don't look closely, most people woud never know the difference....

From what I understand and see; over time, movement from expansion, etc. is bound to crack or "move" the mitre joint. In a cope, one of the crown lengths is never cut. So it goes to the wall... so in a cope, the only length that can "move" is the coped end. Which minimizes any noticeable defect should any movement occur.

But again, if no one looks closely, nobody will notice.

Last edited by slakker; 09-19-2007 at 02:53 AM.
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Old 09-19-2007, 09:03 AM   #12
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


Slakker has bulls eyed coping " in a nut shell"

it is the cleanest way to install stained trim. (no need for caulk)

it works with the ins and outs / ups and downs of less than perfect wall, ceiling, and floor angles.

In todays high production building climate coping sits in an old old shed waiting to be called out on rare occasion with old techniques used by skilled craftsman that take pride in their work.

A really good restoration is one that it is difficult to discern old & new materials and craftsmanship.

I hope you can cope with my answer. ( pun intended)
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Old 09-19-2007, 03:58 PM   #13
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


If you measure the inside corner with the proper measuring tools to get the "exact angle" you will get a near perfect fit. Of course you need the correct table to get your miter and tilt angles. Coping will not get you any near a perfect fit than any other properly done method. And if you can't get a quality coping saw and its your first time coping crown your going to be in for a long day. That's just my opinion.

To add the only time I would recommend coping is in very short corner dimensions where you can't get a measuring tool in place to get the angle. Coping can give very satisfactory results but it isn't for first timers now that the invention of the compound miter is here.

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Last edited by Stubbie; 09-19-2007 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 09-26-2007, 12:13 PM   #14
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


I took down crown to repair/paint. I did number the peices so I know which wall they came from. But, how do figure out how high/low to place them on the wall--is there a way to mark the ends/corners so I have a place to start.
and Yes, I am soooooo sorry I took them down. They were perfect...and I'd like the to be again!
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Old 09-26-2007, 02:29 PM   #15
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Crown Molding: Lay flat or stand upside-down


depending on the width of the moulding and whether it's 45/45 or 52/38 degree mouldings, the "line" will be different...

The best way I found is to measure the moulding then put up a chaulk line. Or if you have, use a laser line... less messy.

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