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Old 11-20-2009, 12:09 PM   #16
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


Gotcha, Mike. I think it is elsewhere, but I asked or meant to ask about using a dremmel, which is a tool I have and love. Again, thanks
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Old 11-20-2009, 01:40 PM   #17
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


Dremel tools are being used more for coping now that Dremel has come out with a Jig saw attachment for their rotary tool. It won't fit the 300 series tool, but is made for the 400 & 4000 series which have a different collar set-up and a more powerful motor.
http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-MS400-M.../dp/B0002QZ1PG

The 400 series motors had a lot of problems so Dremel has come out with the new 4000 series and reconfigured the kits so that you dont get as many included accessories.

The Jig saw was included in the old top end 400-6/90 kit (~$130) while the new 4000-6/50 kit ($150) does NOT include the ~$30 jigsaw.

http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-4000-6-...SIN=B002L3RUW0

As Mike pointed out the Dremel sanding disks and sanding drums are great for fine tuning a cope. They work with any model rotary tool.
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Old 11-20-2009, 02:34 PM   #18
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


As I have the 395 dremmel with a few attachments, I won't be shelling out $$$$ for a newer series. Before I spent it on the new dremmeol, I would buy a new jigsaw.

I just tried coping with the ancient Craftsman sabre saw with its flat foot like in this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4mXCt9q_Rw Not only is it flat, but the two sides are pretty far from the blade so as to make it impossible to rest against the piece. Still, I only did a small piece on it and I can see how the Colllins Coping Foot would make it much easier, but it I didn't do all that bad.

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For pros like Gary,Coping Crown or Base inside corners is de rigueur even for MDF, but it is more common to see inside corners both base and crown to be just mitered.
That DVD of Gary's, unless my hearing is even worse than ever, definitely says you have to cope inside corners, unless you are in So Cal or it is a short run. What he considers a short run I can only guess, but I think he means two or three feet.

That you pros cope everything is probably because you have developed the skill to do it right and tight and quick, plus you are known by your work.

Is a well coped inside corner superior to a perfectly mitered glued corner? Paint grade allows some fudge factor ala caulking.

Speaking of MDF, for a So Cal house outside of the coastal zone what paint grade material would you recommend. MDF, UMDF, one of the less expensive real woods. Is finger joint pine a bad move?
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Old 11-20-2009, 11:44 PM   #19
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You can use a grinder to safely adjust a cope however I prefer a utility knife if that becomes necessary.
Thank you ARI. I found the perfect coping tool.
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Old 11-21-2009, 03:07 AM   #20
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Thank you ARI. I found the perfect coping tool.
Cool Tool, Where is the power cord?
Another alternative would be an Angle Grinder and a Dremel drum sander bit for fine tuning:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91223
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Old 11-21-2009, 03:19 AM   #21
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Cool Tool, Where is the power cord?
This is the cordless model powered by a lithium battery.
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Old 12-04-2009, 08:35 PM   #22
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


I am still playing around pracicing coping with a $9 saw. Like Mike, I also hauled out the dremel. I really didn't understand what to do, until I did it with small pieces. Still, it wasn't working that well and I suspected that I wasn't cutting deep enough. Then I finally found some still photos showing how deeply I should be cutting. Once I get a better handle on coping and my level of skill, I may go ahead and do the miter route. The pros may cope everything, but I am no pro but I can get pretty accurate results if I take my time measuring and making my settings.

Here is a link to the photos I found to be helpful.

http://woodworkingtipsfrompop.com/te...h-a-coping-saw

These are two of my favorites.


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Old 12-04-2009, 10:07 PM   #23
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


Either miter both pieces of crown and be sure to glue the pieces together and "roll" the pieces forward as necessary for a tight fit, shimming the top down and the bottom out (caulk at the ceiling line and wall line as necessary), or miter one piece and then use a hand coping saw along the miter profile with a ever so slight back bevel. The coped piece should joing nicely to the face of the uncoped piece.
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Old 12-04-2009, 10:20 PM   #24
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Either miter both pieces of crown and be sure to glue the pieces together and "roll" the pieces forward as necessary for a tight fit, shimming the top down and the bottom out (caulk at the ceiling line and wall line as necessary), or miter one piece and then use a hand coping saw along the miter profile with a ever so slight back bevel. The coped piece should joing nicely to the face of the uncoped piece.
The first is how I did a small powder room. Now I am getting set to do the dining room and am thinking about coping the inside corners. Are you saying the back bevel in those pictures was a bit exreme for a 90 degree corner? Also, when you say miter the piece to be coped (assume it is a 90 degree inside corner, do you mean cut it upside down and in position and then back cut the bevel about 5 degrees? Thanks.
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Old 12-05-2009, 06:47 AM   #25
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The first is how I did a small powder room. Now I am getting set to do the dining room and am thinking about coping the inside corners. Are you saying the back bevel in those pictures was a bit exreme for a 90 degree corner? Also, when you say miter the piece to be coped (assume it is a 90 degree inside corner, do you mean cut it upside down and in position and then back cut the bevel about 5 degrees? Thanks.
Way too extreme.

Put up the first piece. If the room is square you don't need to cut it at all. Now imagine how the 2nd piece is going to fit to it. Cut the 45 degree angle and hold the 2nd piece up near the first piece. You can see it won't fit, because the cut edge that extends past the paint is protruding. That's the part you have to cut. You can cope it at a 90 degree angle to the wall -- the saw blade comes straight out from the wall, and it will now fit tightly to the other piece.

Bosch makes some really fine toothed jig saw blades.

I cope all my inside corners, even for shoe molding.

I wonder if the reason your powder room has held up is because it's MDF. MDF is pretty dimensionally stable. The reason wooden molding will open up is because it changes shape as it takes on moisture. MDF doesn't change shape.
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Old 12-06-2009, 05:33 AM   #26
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


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I'm kind of old fashioned. I use a coping saw--'Fine tune' the cut with a Dremmel tool with a sanding disk.
this is how I do it as well, coping is new to me, Ive mitered them for many years, now I think I like the cope better
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Old 12-06-2009, 09:38 PM   #27
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Coping Crown Molding in So Cal


Klawman, yes. Place the trim into a framing square and note the dimensions when it is set properly at 90 degrees. e.g. it likely has a larger vertical dimension than horizontal dimension, 4 1/8" X 3 5/8". In this example mark the bed of your mitre box with a pencil line 3 5/8" from and parallel to the fence. If you have crown stops, set your crown stops to this line. Cut your crown upside down with a 45 degree cut for a 90 degree inside corner and then cope the profile. I do a very slight back bevel, yes 5 degrees would be fine, as I use a wood glue or adhesive caulking in the joint and I believe a joint with a greater surface area of contact is less likely to open up in the future. If you are staining the crown a crack in a joint or mitre isn't very noticeable but when you are painting the crown, or any other moulding, and the joint or mitre opens up it looks unprofessional and you'll have to touch it up or live with it until next time you paint (when you would typically fix it with the prep). You always feel good at the end of the day when can see that you have accomplished those extra finishing touches. Crown mouldings are fun.
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Old 12-07-2009, 03:33 AM   #28
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Crown mouldings are fun.
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Old 12-07-2009, 09:44 AM   #29
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I used that Bosch fine tooth blade in my Skill jigsaw. It's about the cheapest jigsaw there is. I took off the foot and used it freehand. It worked great. The blade in question is only about 2" long, maybe 1/8 inch wide, and has probably 40 or more TPI. It cuts on both the upstroke and the downstroke, and I could use it sideways to take a little more material off when necessary.

I also used the drum sander on the Dremel, and that worked swell. Thanks for mention that
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Old 12-07-2009, 03:35 PM   #30
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I used that Bosch fine tooth blade in my Skill jigsaw. It's about the cheapest jigsaw there is. I took off the foot and used it freehand. It worked great. The blade in question is only about 2" long, maybe 1/8 inch wide, and has probably 40 or more TPI. It cuts on both the upstroke and the downstroke, and I could use it sideways to take a little more material off when necessary.

I also used the drum sander on the Dremel, and that worked swell. Thanks for mention that
If its the cheapes jigsaw around, that is what I have. Its a Skill saw marked as a Craftsman that is nearly 20 years old. I will try removing the foot and see how it does, both with the existing blade and with some Bosch blades. You seem to do very well with a fine tooth 40 TPI blade. Surprisingly, Collins and, I believe, Gary Katz like a course Bosch 6 TPI. It may have something to do with the saw and the length and speed of strokes. They don't use cheapie jigsaws like us.
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