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Old 03-23-2013, 04:50 PM   #16
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


You were told earlier that if you put wood on top of current steps you bottom step will increase beyond the acceptable rise. The top step will shrink.

By doing this you will make the stairs not code compliant at all.

Suggest either to just refinish existing or tear out and start over.

Do you have access to the stairs from below?

I just sanded some existing treads and my customer refinished them and they look very good.
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:50 PM   #17
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


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Where's the ballister, and how do you plan on adding a rail with it built like that?
That's something that has plagued me since I moved here.

Remember me? I'm this guy:
Have a railing project to do; split foyer home.

Still working on figuring out how I'm going to do that.
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:54 PM   #18
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


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Just my two cents, I would scrape and refinish what is there now, I refinished some a couple of years back like your's and they turned out looking good.
They are horribly beat up "carpet grade" (lack of better term) treads with splits, cracks, holes, paint, and gouges. What shape did those ones you did start out in?
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:59 PM   #19
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


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You were told earlier that if you put wood on top of current steps you bottom step will increase beyond the acceptable rise.
Not to be a smart-alec, but isn't the whole staircase already unacceptable at 8" vs. 7 3/4"? Also, adding the required backerboard + thinset + tile on the bottom landing will raise lower that height back to the same as the rest, no?

Quote:
The top step will shrink.
Top step rise will go from 8 1/2" to 7 3/4".

Quote:
By doing this you will make the stairs not code compliant at all.
They already aren't. There is NO way to make them code compliant besides as you suggest below, tearing out and starting over. This is not a timely or cost-available option unfortunately.

Quote:
Suggest either to just refinish existing or tear out and start over.

Do you have access to the stairs from below?

I just sanded some existing treads and my customer refinished them and they look very good.
I have access from below, if I pull out the AWESOME drywall work the previous homeowner did...why do you ask?






Last edited by Dave88LX; 03-23-2013 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:02 PM   #20
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


as long as you are adding the same flooring to al the steps and landings your riser height would stay the same. so in that case i would cut off nosing flush with riser.
scribe in new skirt boards which will cover the old skirt board. http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2011/...-skirt-boards/
use the same flooring you are using on floor use it on the riser and treads with the matching stair nosing piece
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:05 PM   #21
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


Any reason why when you built that wall on the right hand side of the steps and left all that flooring exposed?
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:08 PM   #22
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


Whoa whoa, first let me make it clear I had *nothing* to do with the construction or design of this house.

Are you talking about the picture with the couch in it? Or which are you talking about?
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:25 PM   #23
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


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as long as you are adding the same flooring to al the steps and landings your riser height would stay the same. so in that case i would cut off nosing flush with riser.
scribe in new skirt boards which will cover the old skirt board. http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2011/...-skirt-boards/
use the same flooring you are using on floor use it on the riser and treads with the matching stair nosing piece
I'm currently at 33" width. Code is calling for 36", I'm already 3" short on the width. Stupid house. What is the intention of the second skirt board; to fill in the holes that cutting off the tread overhangs will leave?
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:44 PM   #24
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


yes and you can use a 1/4 plywood or a veneer to do so will not shrink steps much.then cap top of skirt board to cover veneer.
also you have to keep in mind code when house was built is different from today. i would put railing at top floor and leave open between flights due to it probably being grandfathered in. but if you choose not to you could put newel at landing run hand rail up into the wall and add spindles that would attach to skirt board. but i do not believe it would ever look right.
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:47 PM   #25
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


Oh I definitely need to put a railing up between them. I still have kids, I don't want them toppling over the edge. Or my dogs thinking they can jump over. That link didn't work, but skirt boards seem to be a PITA to make. Then again, everything seemed like a PITA until I tried it.

Nothing will ever look right on that stairwell because of the stupid angled wall.
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Old 03-23-2013, 05:58 PM   #26
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


http://www.thisiscarpentry.com
it is at this web site and it gives an easy way to do so
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:25 AM   #27
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


Since you said you wanted to paint the stringers and risers I would leave those intact. Putty or bondo the knots and then primer them before painting. The treads I would remove and replace with your hardwood ones keeping the nosing at 1 1/8" and tread depth at 10". Only problem is your 8 1/2" per rise. I could understand that rise IF your treads were deeper, say around 11" instead of 10". Anyways if you wanted to convert the left side to an open you can remove that stringer and install a cut out open stringer. Run your risers edge flush with the outside edge of the stringer. Run your treads 1 3/8 longer than what they currently are. Reason for the treads being that much is because you will be installing a return miter on that end. 1 1/8" is what your nosing is but I said 1 3/8". The extra 1/4" would be so you can also install tread brackets which would slip in behind the back end of the return (reason for that 1/4" gap) and those brackets will cover your end grain of the risers. You can also go with routered returns which means you would have your treads flush with your risers (and stringer) and still cover the end grain of your risers but then youll also see end grain on the front of your tread returns.
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Old 03-24-2013, 11:13 AM   #28
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


This one is a no brainer to me. This whole staircase is very accessible. Order a new staircase with oak treads directly from a millwork, take out the old, and put in the new.
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Old 03-24-2013, 02:49 PM   #29
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


When measuring the width of the stair (out to out) you measure from outside of the stringers not the inside of them. So if the inside of your stair is 34" then you meet the 36" code.
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Old 03-24-2013, 08:52 PM   #30
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"Converting" carpeted stairs to hardwood stairs.


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Originally Posted by Jason34 View Post
When measuring the width of the stair (out to out) you measure from outside of the stringers not the inside of them. So if the inside of your stair is 34" then you meet the 36" code.
Did not know this, thanks!

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This one is a no brainer to me. This whole staircase is very accessible. Order a new staircase with oak treads directly from a millwork, take out the old, and put in the new.
What would the estimated cost of that be ball park? Hundreds? Thousands?

Please don't take this the wrong way. I know there's the right way and wrong way to do things...The thing is, we are about $50K upside-down in this house (Bought in 2007 before the bubble popped). Going to rent it out, and buying another house that's not a cluster, that doesn't need everything to be remodeled, for a lower monthly payment. This house is a sinking hole of money. I don't want to put any more money into it than necessary. If I was going to live here, I would absolutely pull the stairs out and have them done new. This isn't an option though in this case. They need to be "nice enough to rent." I DO appreciate all of your opinions though.

Last edited by Dave88LX; 03-24-2013 at 09:18 PM.
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