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Old 09-10-2010, 03:38 PM   #1
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Concrete spurs for a wooden fence


I have put up a fence along the length of my garden, I live in an extremely windy area (on top of a cliff) and need to know the best way to support the posts. I have a wooden closed boarding fence with posts that are set in concrete but still come loose. I am thinking of concrete spurs. Can anyone help with this? How will the spurs help?

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Old 09-11-2010, 08:26 AM   #2
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Concrete spurs for a wooden fence


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Originally Posted by Drinthehouse View Post
I have put up a fence along the length of my garden, I live in an extremely windy area (on top of a cliff) and need to know the best way to support the posts. I have a wooden closed boarding fence with posts that are set in concrete but still come loose. I am thinking of concrete spurs. Can anyone help with this? How will the spurs help?
Part of the reason your fence posts "still come loose" is the very fact that they are set in concrete.

Concrete is probably the worst thing to use for setting fence posts.

First of all, concrete shrinks a tiny bit as it cures. This shrinkage allows water to seep down the void it creates between the post and the concrete around the post. This water softens and eventually rots the wooden post.

Fresh water (not saltwater) provides the necessary conditions for mold to grow. Mold feeds on wood. It LOVES the stuff! Mold = rot.

The best way I've found to set wooden posts is to dig the hole twice as wide as you need it to be, and fill in around the post with gravel.

Gravel lets rainwater and snow melt drain on through, allowing it to be absorbed by the dirt. This lets the woooden post dry back out after soakings. Mold does not survive well on dry wood.

The gravel also continually settles and reshifts itself as the winds and ground movement move the fence post, keeping pressure always tight up against the post.

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Last edited by Willie T; 09-13-2010 at 03:34 PM.
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Old 09-11-2010, 12:14 PM   #3
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Concrete spurs for a wooden fence


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I have a wooden closed boarding fence
Around here, we leave spaces between fence boards to allow the wind to pass through. It reduces the wind load on the posts.
Also, do you have any diagonals installed?
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