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Old 03-13-2011, 12:53 PM   #1
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Cabinet trim gaps


I had my kitchen redone 2 years ago. Last winter these gaps between the minicrown molding and the cieling opened up. I initially thought my cabinets were falling but then it closed up in the spring. I am assumming I have an expansion/contraction problemand that the gap will close again once it warms up. The trim is braded to the cabinets which are screwed to the wall. The trim is birch. I know wood and my house expands throughout the year, but this gap seems excessive. Is this normal? Was the trim installed incorrectly? Should I reinstall the trim in different manner?
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Old 03-13-2011, 05:09 PM   #2
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Cabinet trim gaps


From you description of it opening athen closing, it would seem the framing is moving seasonally. This is more typical of truss framing then stick framing.
I'd leave the molding alone and add caulking to the gap when it opens. Hopefully the caulk will eliminate the issue.
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Old 03-19-2011, 01:55 AM   #3
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Sounds like a seasonal issue. Probably truss uplift which occurs in the winter. If you put caulk in it now it will look awful in the summer. Learn to look past it.
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Old 03-19-2011, 06:04 PM   #4
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Cabinet trim gaps


Thanks. i was nto going to caulk it. That would just be worse. I was thinking maybe nail he trim to the cieling instead of the cabinets. anyone think that would work?
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Old 03-19-2011, 06:27 PM   #5
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Cabinet trim gaps


You could attach another piece of trim to the overhang (not the cabinet) to cover the gap. The new trim will move with the expansion and contraction and act as a slip joint so you won't see the gap.
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Old 03-19-2011, 07:07 PM   #6
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if you fastened it to the ceiling you would have to cut it loose from the cabinets, this would it allow to move independent of the cabinets,

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Old 03-19-2011, 07:16 PM   #7
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You could attach another piece of trim to the overhang (not the cabinet) to cover the gap. The new trim will move with the expansion and contraction but at least you will not see the gap.
I think that this option is probably the best one. Here's hoping that you can match the wood and finish.
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Old 03-19-2011, 09:55 PM   #8
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Cabinet trim gaps


That looks like a pretty large amount of movement. Is the furr down open into an attic above. If so, I would go up there and insulate the furr down to help isolate it's framing from the temperature extremes of the attic temps.

As stated, if you nail the trim to the ceiling, you would have to cut it loose from the cabinets to allow free movement; a task that is pretty much going to result in damage to the cabinets.
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Old 03-20-2011, 10:19 PM   #9
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Cabinet trim gaps


The trim is nailed to the cabinets with 18ga brads. It should not be too hard to remove. I will also look in theother trim idea.

The soffit is below an attic, butthe attic is well insulated with 25 inches of bow-in fiberglass.
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Old 04-01-2011, 05:42 AM   #10
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The best idea is to put another trim to cover the gap.
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Old 04-01-2011, 07:03 PM   #11
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if you fastened it to the ceiling you would have to cut it loose from the cabinets, this would it allow to move independent of the cabinets,

Mark
Mark is right. This is the only way to do it.
As far as truss uplift cures, I put blocking on top of each wall plate between as well as parallel to the trusses. Then I convinced the dw hangers to screw into the blocks or hold back the screws 16" from the walls. Result is that the trusses still lift up, but the drywall doesn't
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:51 AM   #12
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Cabinet trim gaps


I thinkl another iece of trim will look hokey. I may jusy learn to ignore it. I might give nailing to the cieling a try. Don't wait for an update. I won't know the effectiveness untill about December.

Also, I did not install the trim. What would be the standard carpentry approach? Nail to cabinets, nail to cieling, glue to wall or ceiling?
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:05 AM   #13
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Cabinet trim gaps


Standard procedure would be to fasten the trim to the cabinets.

That seems like excessive movement in that ceiling.

Removing the trim and trying to fasten it to the ceiling is unrealistic.

Does the gap close tight in the off season?
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Old 04-02-2011, 11:07 AM   #14
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I have an idea but it requires a look at the rest of the soffit around the room......
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Old 04-02-2011, 02:41 PM   #15
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Gap closes tight in the spring and summer. At least it did last year.

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