DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   BUTCHERBLOCK HELP! Don't want to screw this up... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/butcherblock-help-dont-want-screw-up-98820/)

kronic24601 03-18-2011 07:27 PM

BUTCHERBLOCK HELP! Don't want to screw this up...
 
Ok here is the deal. I bought two craftsman butcherblock tables tops (2'x6') and wanted to glue them together for one awesome 4'x6' table top.

I trimmed just a little of 1 of the long edges of each top, and glued and clamped them together.

Problem is, there is a "slight" variance (tinny lift) in one spot and some tiny gaps in others. (mostly due to the table tops themselves not being 100% flat).

So, I know I can put a little wood filler in, then sand and then apply something but ... how do I do this without jacking up the finish. Really I just want that 1 seem to look good. I don't want to re-do the whole new top.

1) What sand paper grit should I use.
2) What finish should I apply? (Mineral oil/beeswax? other?)

THANKS SO MUCH!

Ron6519 03-19-2011 06:23 AM

You should have jointed the edges before you glued them together. There's not much you're going to do after the fact other then a filler which will not be a good visual.
Cut them apart and joint the edges. Put them together in a dry fit to check for issues. Correct the issues before you glue them together.
If, after the glue up, one side is slightly above the other, sand it flush.
When you're happy with the connection, then you finish the surface.
Rushing the process only leads to redoing it.
Ron

JoeLena 03-19-2011 07:35 AM

What Ron said.

If you didn't know to do this first then we can assume you are not a woodworker, nobodies perfect :).

If you want it to look right then both joined edges need to be perfect, and matching. Call a couple of local cabinet shops and see what they would charge. It will be worth it. There are ways to take some of the thick edge off and add a mechanical way to pull it tight, without losing any of the strength of the joint. They should be able to help.

Post your location and someone may be able to recommend a place.

oh'mike 03-19-2011 07:49 AM

Post a picture if you can---it sounds like you glued end grain to end grain----that is the weakest of all wood joints---post a picture and suggestions will come.---Mike---

kronic24601 03-19-2011 12:01 PM

Hi Guys,

Thanks for your help. Here is a photo, the split looks a lot larger here than it is ... each of the wood sectionals is 2.25" thick. Oh and yes, to those that already saw the obvious. I'm a total noob. Gotta learn somehow right? (I should mention, there is no "seam" on the ends ... i'ts only in the middle a bit.)

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_d...318_172834.jpg

DangerMouse 03-19-2011 12:14 PM

Have you flipped the pieces around? Sometimes a gap on one side will be flat and flush flipped to the other side.
At least around here. Po)

DM

kronic24601 03-19-2011 12:28 PM

I did try that, but it was worse. I got these two tops for $80 a piece ... obviously craftsman isn't trying as hard as they used to ...:mad:

In any case ... I'm to lazy to saw them apart and try again... knowing me I'd just make it worse. I think I'll try this

  1. Apply wood filler (let dry)
  2. Use WET #400 Sandpaper with Mineral Oil to Sand
  3. Then ... um ... beeswax and hope for the best?
I figure if this doesn't work, I can always cut it off later. My question is this.

1) #400 isn't likely to take off any "edges" should I start with a 220? ... or is this a horrible idea and I should use #600 or higher?
2) is this a horrible idea in general?

danrb007 03-19-2011 12:52 PM

Did you use any dowels or biscuits when you put the two pieces together? If not with a gap like that it will be a weak point in the table top and possible break apart at some point. It would be worth the effort to just cut it along the joint. You will only loose the saw blade width in material. Then if you don't have a jointer, take it to the local High School and I bet they would be happy to joint it and dowel or biscuit the joint and glue it for you. They may even be willing to cut it back apart for you.

Filling it and sanding will only hide it but it will be a weak joint.

Sanding: I would not use wet sandpaper. Do it all dry, start with 60 or 80 grit get the majority of the material at the joint sanded down being careful not to take to much off. Then move to 100 or 120 grit, then 220, and then if you want do a final with 440. With each sanding be sure to sand the entire surface to keep it even and uniform. Alway sand with the grain, if you don't the sanding marks will show when you put a finish on.

kronic24601 03-19-2011 01:14 PM

hmm ... ok ... this is just showing me how stupid I was to start this before posting here.

1) No I did not use any dowels or biscuits ... doh!
2) Jointer ... damn ... that would have been a good idea as well.

well ... I guess I'd better contact some Wood shops in the area I live in the San Fernando Valley of CA (Los Angeles County).

On a side note. As far as the week joint goes. If this table top is sitting on top of another plywood top, will the week joint matter? Or will it still eventually split more along that line over time? (I really am a newby).

DangerMouse 03-19-2011 01:17 PM

Are they solid? What type of wood and how thick?
I know what I'D do...

DM

beerdog 03-19-2011 05:02 PM

You don't want to use filler on that. It will not look good. If you do any type of finish on it it will liekly show like a sore thumb. Just cut it apart witha circular saw. No need to be accurate. If you can haul it as is just have the shop that jointers it cut it apart. they will liekly have a large table saw and it will take them no more than 5 minutes. Biscuits will help keep the top surfaces even.

Jackofall1 03-19-2011 06:04 PM

What are the other (2) surfaces like? can you cut apart, turn each piece 180*, then drill dowels and join. Just a thought as the original surfaces should already be straight.

Mark

danrb007 03-20-2011 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kronic24601 (Post 612639)

On a side note. As far as the week joint goes. If this table top is sitting on top of another plywood top, will the week joint matter? Or will it still eventually split more along that line over time? (I really am a newby).

It may not, but how would you feel if after you get it all finished and looking nice it comes apart. Then you have to start all over again. Why not do it right before you get it all done.

Ron6519 03-20-2011 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jackofall1 (Post 612768)
What are the other (2) surfaces like? can you cut apart, turn each piece 180*, then drill dowels and join. Just a thought as the original surfaces should already be straight.

Mark

The doweling procees takes a lot more experience then either a router and a spline or a bisquit connection.
Ron

epson 03-20-2011 11:55 AM

If the doweling or bisquit joining is too hard for him maybe he should looking into getting a kreg jig which is much more user friendly just a thought…


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:47 AM.


Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved