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Old 09-09-2010, 03:23 PM   #1
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Building a wood storm window...


I have an old 1915 Craftsman Style Bungalow. Several of the windows have wooden storm windows, most of which need repaired/replaced. I have tossed around the idea of building new wooden units as well as buying aluminum, but after pricing the aluminum, I've pretty much decided to give building wooden ones a go.

Here are my questions:
1) What type of wood should I use? Douglas Fir? Poplar? How about PVC Vinyl?? Something else??

2) Considering these won't be handled much would pocket screws with stainless hardware be an ok option to attach the styles and rails or am I a lot better off with Mortise and Tennon joints?

3) Any suggestions on type of glass to use?

FWI....I am in the process of building a screen door out of 2x6 douglas fir that I ripped and plained along with M&T joints. Though I think it'll last a long time, it seems to be a lot of overkill for windows that I might remove once or twice a year if I decide to build screen units for airflow or for cleaning.

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Old 09-09-2010, 09:12 PM   #2
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Building a wood storm window...


hey there brian.
if it were my house i would go to the hardware supplier and get something like "sapele" or "meranti," in a rough sawn 5/4 or 4/4. joint/rip it down.

then pocket screws i think would be just fine. use a single pane glass or maybe even 1/8" plexi glass. you're not going to get the argon gas in there so there's no point in double glazed/tempered i don't think, but someone might chide me this...

on top of getting the rot resistant wood, i would prime and paint.

i would not use pine. fir will wind up being just as pricey if not more than something like sapele, spanish cedar, mahogany, etc... in the roughsawn.

good luck.

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Old 09-09-2010, 10:00 PM   #3
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Building a wood storm window...


Thanks for the reply, I will call the local mill and see if they can get me those woods. I can't buy direct, but they sell to Lowes or H.D.. I might even try another local lumber yard, maybe they can get it as well.....

If I can get it to lay out, I'm thinking of trying a lap joint along with the pocket screws, but we'll see. I'll try a test piece and see what happens. I'm hoping the pocket screws work out well as they are fast and easy and even though I want these to hold up, I don't want to spend the next 6+ months making these. I have 8, I'd like to get made before it gets cold and up to another 20+ down the road!!

Thanks again!!
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Old 09-09-2010, 10:04 PM   #4
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Building a wood storm window...


sure thing. well, if you can't get mahogany, spanish cedar, western red cedar, or sapele or meranti,
next best would be fir, followed by clear pine.

a lap joint or even a bridle joint would be nice too. a bridle joint is like a mortise and tenon but the mortise is open all the way through the end grain. much faster to cut. do it all right on the table saw set up for repetitive cuts.
then you can glue and peg/screw the joints. would hold up great.
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Old 09-10-2010, 12:35 PM   #5
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Building a wood storm window...


For glass get 1/8" thick glass (double strength or DS its also called). Plexi will scratch very easily and not look as good as glass will a couple years from now.
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Old 09-10-2010, 03:21 PM   #6
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Building a wood storm window...


Enjoy!

http://www.google.com/search?tbs=bks...5cdb1806fef4aa

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Old 09-23-2010, 07:41 PM   #7
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Building a wood storm window...


Hi Brian,
My 1930 house also has its original storm windows and I would like to refurbish them. May I ask if you will be using the standard hangars (2-screws). Van Dyke's restorers has "new" 3-screw models which look more secure. My question is if it will allow an airtight seal, since they are designed to be seasonally changed.

Another storm window project I worked on I built the storm windows from scratch and customized them to fit into the 1 5/16th cavity, securing them with hidden bracked hangers on the side, which is more permanent, though a bit trickier to remove/install, especially since I sandwiched two 1/8" glass pane (argon fill) in it. Quite heavy but good for quieting the noisy city, the keeping the pollution out.

In any case, I would like to hear your thoughts. I have some 20 wood storm windows that need restoring and/or rebuilding. I will restore most of the current permanent wood windows by securing another (low-E) pane over the sashes. I hate vinyl, aluminum and fiberglass. I wish though that they would sell oil-based paint.
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Old 09-23-2010, 08:14 PM   #8
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Building a wood storm window...


Kurt, honestly I haven't seen the 3 bolt hangers @ Van Dykes, last I knew they didn't carry these. I'll have to look into them. I had a few other places I had planned on using. I'll give you links if you'd like. I do think I can get a pretty good seal, but alas time will tell. I'm going to look into routing a groove for weatherstripping if need be.

I am curious about your argon filled panes. Did you somehow do that yourself or buy them? Not sure I could do that with my 3/4"-1" thick frames, but curious. I thought about low-e glass, but the glass store recommended against it if using single pain glass as they said the coating would scratch easily...!?

I feel your pain....I have about 35 windows, 4 of which won't take storms and of the rest only 3 have wood storms, so I have a lot of building to do.

You can't buy oil based paint? We can get it in Kansas and I'm tring to use oil primer on all exterior, then latex paint over that.
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Old 09-23-2010, 09:14 PM   #9
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Building a wood storm window...


You can get an insulated glass unit as small as 3/8" overall thickness but that would leave you little room for any kind of stops.
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Old 09-23-2010, 11:04 PM   #10
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Building a wood storm window...


Ok, I checked out those 3 bolt units and they do look a lot more solid, but I'm not sure it's worth the extra cost. Hmm...maybe for my larger windows, but then the question would it look mis-matched?

House of Antique Hardware, has a fairly large selection and their 3 bolt ones are a bit less expensive.

This place also has several options and they have stays that I haven't been able to find elsewhere.

As for the insulated glass is it worth the extra cost and where might one find them? Problem is most of my windows are 63" tall and up to 40" wide.
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Old 09-24-2010, 10:39 AM   #11
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Building a wood storm window...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Brian View Post

As for the insulated glass is it worth the extra cost and where might one find them? Problem is most of my windows are 63" tall and up to 40" wide.

I dont think its worth the cost.
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Old 09-24-2010, 11:54 AM   #12
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Building a wood storm window...


I would advise that for repair/refurbish window work, the lifetime be at least 10 years, if not 20. The energy savings by spending a bit more will justify the cost, and the payback will be shorter for DIY and since the window is being serviced anyway.

Van Dyke's technical contact person told me that the standard sashes do not provide an airtight seal. This makes sense and was probably originally designed to allow small air circulation. However an airtight seal via a more sophisticated storm hanger will seal sound, and air drafts.

As I consider also replacing my 4 1/2" o/s trim since it has been abused by paint over the years, with some rotted parts, I will see if I can integrate a more secure window hanger, sticking with the awning style (hinged top), and rendering it more or less permanent.

A product justifying the simpler, permanent storm window installation is here. Since the seasonal changeover is done from the inside, the hassle of second story changes is eliminated. Plus, a screen insert during the warm months is the most effective method to block the sun's radiant heat. Seasonally adjustable U-values make the most sense from an energy standpoint, allowing smaller HVAC systems.

Kurt

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