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Old 12-07-2009, 05:27 PM   #16
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


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All these suggestions are fine if you consider your own labor as free. Personally my time is worth more than cobbling together a $4.00 stud.
If I can do ten of them in an hour it's worth it to me.

If it takes me one hour but saves me a one hour trip to town to buy the studs, then it's worth twice as much.

If it prevents me from needing to tell the wife I need to buy more wood then it's priceless

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Old 12-07-2009, 07:17 PM   #17
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


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If it prevents me from needing to tell the wife I need to buy more wood then it's priceless

touche
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Old 12-08-2009, 03:18 AM   #18
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


I am no framer or carpenter, but I have a question. I think someone suggested building two 5' walls; one atop the other. Others have talked about joining two shorter piesces together by different methods. I don't know which is better, but I would think that if you build 10' studs from two shorter pieces, it may be best to offet the joints. (Ex. Stud1 is a 6' on top of a 4', nest to it in the wall is stud 2. this time a 4' is on top of a 6". If you have plenty of wood, not only mortise the two peices together (if I am using the correct term) with glue and nails, but place a couple of 3" boards on each side of the joint.)
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:11 AM   #19
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


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If it prevents me from needing to tell the wife I need to buy more wood then it's priceless
TRUER WORDS HAVE NEVER BEEN SPOKEN!!!
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Old 12-08-2009, 11:48 AM   #20
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


It's a shed man, of course it can be done!

Build 2 5' walls and overlap them at the corners with a double top plate like you would a full length wall and just make sure you when you build your top wall directly over your lower wall studs to support the load ( this is really not even that important either assuming you'll use 16" centers) and the sheathing will add extra locking power from sway. 1/2" is fine, no need to get crazy with 3/4!

Just try not to use overly warped studs for your bottom and top plates and frame as tight as you can.

It's a shed without any rediculous code compliance.

"build it and you can store"
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Old 12-08-2009, 12:11 PM   #21
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


Are you sure this free lumber is 2x4s? We have literally hundreds of pallets where I work, for heavy stuff like pumps, large motors, etc. None of them have any 2x4s in them.
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Old 12-08-2009, 05:47 PM   #22
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


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Are you sure this free lumber is 2x4s? We have literally hundreds of pallets where I work, for heavy stuff like pumps, large motors, etc. None of them have any 2x4s in them.
I have seen most pallets as you described but I have also seen pallets made with PT 4 X 4's.

I have not measured the studs myself, but can only assume if the OP posted he had access to 2 X 4's in 5 - 6ft. lengths that's what he meant.

It's kinda like someone getting detailed drawings from a structural engineer with a certain number of 2 X 12's that they would need to carry a load over a certain length than going out and trying to scab it together with that number of 2 X 6's.

"What do you mean you're not going to pass it"?
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:50 PM   #23
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Build 10 foot wall with 5 foot 2x4's


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I don't know which is better, but I would think that if you build 10' studs from two shorter pieces, it may be best to offet the joints.
Maybe a little.

If you scarf the joints so that the joint is across the 4" dimension (joint two 1x4s, and not two 2x2s), then the joint will be pretty strong. A 2x4 has two dimensions, width (2 inches) and depth (4 inches). A scarf joint as described will have essentially as much strength in the depth dimension as uncut lumber -- the wood itself will always fail before the glue. In the other dimension it will only be as strong as a 1x4. But that's OK, because building's don't rely on that strength. They either have sheer panels (plywood in the corners) or they have diagonal bracing in the studs.

Then all you're left with is the remote possibility that you're going to get wind gust so strong that they're going to be able to sheer your building at the joints in the 2x4s. From a practical standpoint, you're probably going to have the roof blow off long before the studs sheer.

If I was going to do it I'd just make a simple jig for my circular saw and finish the cuts with the sawzall. Either that or put the stacked dado's on the table saw. Either way it would probably take less than five minutes each to splice two ends into a full length board.

If the building is sheathed in T-111, then all this discussion is probably silly. My pole barn is sheathed in T-111 and my framing consists of 2x4s on the perimeters of the sheets. But they're glued and screwed. The roof will blow off long before there's any issue with the sheathing.

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