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Old 01-31-2008, 12:38 PM   #1
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Board cutting problem


I have (2) 1"x10"x12'-0" pine boards that I am using as a shelf on top of a half wall. The problem is where they meet at the corner. I would like to miter them but having some difficultly. I have a 10" compound miter saw and a table saw. The border final length will be about 11'-0", so too large to use a table saw. The 10" saw cut thru a 10" wide board when cutting it at a 45 degree. I have tried a circular saw but did not get the desired straight cut required...and wasted the board. I wish I had a radial arm saw but would only need it for this one joint.

Any suggestions on achieving a nice mitered cut?

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Old 01-31-2008, 12:56 PM   #2
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Board cutting problem


Do you have a circular saw? clamp a fence along your cut path minus the base and your off. Otherwise, use a sharp hand saw with a light touch, if you wanted you could still clamp a guide to achieve a crisp saw line.

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Old 01-31-2008, 10:33 PM   #3
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Board cutting problem


Cut as much as possible with the chop saw, flip the board over and swap the angle on the saw to 45 the other way - complete the cut.
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Old 02-05-2008, 12:47 PM   #4
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Flipping the board on your miter saw as suggesed rarely comes out as expected either on a wide cut, because it requires both the saw to be dead on accurate and the board to be held perfectly in place. If this is paint grade work, you should be able to get satisfactory results with a clamped straightedge ( a large speed square works good for miters) , and a circular saw. If it is stain work, I suggest cutting a little long, then using the large speed square as a guide for a router with a trimming bit.

Not to spoil your party as they say, but no matter how perfect the fit is the moment you finish it, it will not be that way for long. A 1 x 10 pine board is not only going to cup, but a miter that long will open an close probably 3/16 of an inch as the seasons change.
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Old 02-05-2008, 12:49 PM   #5
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Board cutting problem


Make sure that the corner of the wall is really 90 degrees, otherwise you will have a perfect 45, on each of your shelves and still have a gap
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Old 04-02-2008, 09:19 AM   #6
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Board cutting problem


Figured out a method to cut the board. Was able to get this cut just right. Thanks for the information.
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Old 04-02-2008, 09:42 AM   #7
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Board cutting problem


Great...what did you end up doing?
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Old 04-02-2008, 08:15 PM   #8
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Board cutting problem


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Great...what did you end up doing?
I cut the two boards to the outside corner length (cross-cut). Then I over-lapped them. I marked the intersection on the two boards (inside corner). I scribed a line on both boards from the outside corner. Then cut the two boards on a 10" compound miter saw at the angle of the scribed line. I could only saw half way and needed to turn the board over and switched the saw to the opposite side at the angle required. Then finished the cut slightly off mark from the "good" side and then moved the board over closer millimeter by millimeter till the cut was flush with the first. I repeated the process with the second board. Install the boards and the seam was good as I needed it to be. Only other thing I had to do was sand the seam area more than the rest to level out the difference in bow between the two pieces. Stained and then apply numerous coats of polyurethane.


Pictures below. Now in the process of drywalling above and below on half wall.

Before


After

Last edited by ADKstorm; 04-02-2008 at 08:21 PM. Reason: added before picture
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Old 04-03-2008, 10:31 AM   #9
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Board cutting problem


Looks good...outta curiosity, why did you choose to install the ledge before drywalling?
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Old 04-03-2008, 12:54 PM   #10
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Looks good...outta curiosity, why did you choose to install the ledge before drywalling?
My thoughts exactly... ...?
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Old 04-03-2008, 07:32 PM   #11
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Board cutting problem


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Originally Posted by RippySkippy View Post
Looks good...outta curiosity, why did you choose to install the ledge before drywalling?
Drywall above covers the nails fastening the shelf down....found it easier. Front of the shelf board was fastened from underneath through the half wall top sill into the board, which can't be done if drywall was done first. Basically I ended up with a shelf where I had no nail/screw indentations to worry about.

Second I stained and polyurethaned prior to drywall which I thought it would be easier and faster not worrying about getting stain or polyurethane on the drywall.

Might be other ways of doing it....just thought this was the best and easiest for me for the best result.
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Old 04-04-2008, 08:31 AM   #12
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Board cutting problem


Gottcha.

"Usually" the tasks associated to drywalling can be brutal on finished things like that. Not just the dust, but sanding, and texturing.

I would suggest you cover the shelf with brown paper, cardboard and plastic, in that order. The brown paper would go from the lower wall over the shelf to the upper wall following the bends at the corners. The cardboard would run to the plate only on the top of the shelf. The plastic would go from the lower to the upper wall following the bends at the corners. The brown paper may be overkill...but I hate cleaning up DW messes and possibly fixing dings which hopefully the cardboard will provided some cushion for the top. When your done DW, take a sharp knife and cut the plastic and brown paper and cover the small gap with trim of some sort.

Good luck to you...post more pictures when you get it completed.
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Old 04-04-2008, 11:52 AM   #13
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Board cutting problem


ADK, have you considered the fact that the shelf CANNOT ever be replaced or repaired once the drywall is installed?
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Old 04-04-2008, 12:40 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by skymaster View Post
ADK, have you considered the fact that the shelf CANNOT ever be replaced or repaired once the drywall is installed?
Sure it can be replaced. Along with the drywall, mud, tape, primer, paint...
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Old 04-04-2008, 08:14 PM   #15
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ADK, have you considered the fact that the shelf CANNOT ever be replaced or repaired once the drywall is installed?
Yes, but this is mainly decorative cap on the half wall....and I think it will last for the amount of time I plan on staying in the house before going new build ....and i have no kids to damage it.

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