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senior-chief 07-05-2012 09:15 AM

Biscuits
 
Question: Since I do not own a biscuit joiner, how did people insert biscuits, i.e., 2 x 6's? Hopefully my learning curve continues to grow....Thank you

DangerMouse 07-05-2012 09:21 AM

Sorry, I don't understand your question. To use biscuits, you need a biscuit joiner tool.
Then they glue in place. Pretty basic.

DM

DexterII 07-05-2012 09:49 AM

Depending on what you are doing, dadoes with splines or holes with dowels may be viable alternatives; otherwise, as DM said, biscuits generally require a biscuit cutter.

senior-chief 07-05-2012 04:10 PM

Thank you too both you guys. Time to purchase a biscuit joiner---have a goodin'

Canarywood1 07-05-2012 06:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by senior-chief (Post 958411)
Question: Since I do not own a biscuit joiner, how did people insert biscuits, i.e., 2 x 6's? Hopefully my learning curve continues to grow....Thank you



You don't need a biscuit joiner,you can use a router and a slot cutter in a table

woody4249 07-08-2012 10:42 AM

Biscuits typically are made from compressed plywood and come in different sizes. They are approximately 3/16" thick and shaped like an American football. Once glue is applied and inserted into the slot, they expand and form a tight fit. Wood dowels do the same thing and are usually 8mm in dia.
These however are not so forgiving and accuracy with boring is paramount
These are utilized in the cabinet industry for joining panels and are not usually considered a "joinery" method for carpenters with structural material.

When joining 2x6's in a "T" joint there are three traditional ways of creating a sturdy joint. Other than a "Butt joint" it could be "Half lapped", morticed, or trenched with a "Dado"
If this joint is considered a "significant structural point", additional support can be gained by use of a joist hanger, metal bracket or strapping.

As a biscuit joiner has only one purpose, it may be to your advantage to purchase a router and utilize a box bit router cutter. With the use of jigs you will be able to perform the same task and have a very versatile tool for other projects.

Mike

Tom Struble 07-08-2012 12:04 PM

get a Kreg pocket screw kit instead:)

woody4249 07-08-2012 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Struble (Post 960748)
get a Kreg pocket screw kit instead:)

Oh.....I forgot about that........best tool I ever bought

Mike

PaliBob 07-08-2012 12:36 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by senior-chief (Post 958622)
.....Time to purchase a biscuit joiner..........

You've got it. Biscuits need an oval shape hole.
Trying to use a router or table saw while fine
for splines won't cut it for biscuits.

Also biscuits are not made from plywood
but usually from compressed Beech.
They are made to expand to make a tight joint.
That's why it's best to store them in an
airtight container.

woody4249 07-08-2012 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 960778)
You've got it. Biscuits need an oval shape hole.
Trying to use a router or table saw while fine
for splines won't cut it for biscuits.

Also biscuits are not made from plywood
but usually from compressed Beech.
They are made to expand to make a tight joint.
That's why it's best to store them in an
airtight container.

I stand corrected..........I really should know better having used them a gazzillion times

DangerMouse 07-08-2012 01:06 PM

Personally, I'm still trying to imagine using biscuits to connect two by sixes!!!!

(unless someone can explain to me what a 2X6' is! " = inches, ' = feet )

DM

PaliBob 07-09-2012 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by senior-chief (Post 958411)
....how did people insert biscuits, i.e., 2 x 6's?

Festool makes a large mortise tool (The Domino XL) that evolved from the wood biscuit technology.
Anybody with an extra $1250 can just get started with this Tool.

senior-chief 07-09-2012 03:03 PM

Biscuit joiner
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PaliBob (Post 961345)
Festool makes a large mortise tool (The Domino XL) that evolved from the wood biscuit technology.
Anybody with an extra $1250 can just get started with this Tool.

:laughing: Oh man, $1250 for biscuit joiner? Send me back to Vietnam--Ha--Hell, I am a newbie and probably need more advice after all. I was thinking a used B.J--Festol is way out of the way for this old sailor--Thank you, Mike:)

DangerMouse 07-09-2012 03:14 PM

I know, my son and I were just looking at that too..... I spent less on our riding mower! LOL
You have to admit though, if you had the need, that's a pretty sweet tool! Po)

(Go Navy!)

DM

jschaben 07-09-2012 03:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by senior-chief (Post 961596)
:laughing: Oh man, $1250 for biscuit joiner? Send me back to Vietnam--Ha--Hell, I am a newbie and probably need more advice after all. I was thinking a used B.J--Festol is way out of the way for this old sailor--Thank you, Mike:)

Here's a little more affordable version.
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...2&site=ROCKLER

Might help, a lot, to know just what you are working on.

Here is a system for using a router to put in biscuits:
http://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shops.../biscuits.html

Personally, I would get the router over the biscuit joiner as the router is much more versatile. That is, if you have neither. :)


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