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Old 11-18-2011, 06:53 PM   #16
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


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Any way you could remove the fascia and slide in a new rafter? There must be a wood plate/sill on the concrete wall which could be notched at the same angle as the roof so that the new rafter would have more bearing on the plate. Then use a joist hanger on the left end of the rafter
You mean left the rotted piece entirely in place and just slide in a new piece at same angle adjacent to it?

Possibly.

I would have to remove three layers of fascia and a 2x10 header to which the fascia are nailed to just to find out though.

There is another solution I am contemplating.

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Old 11-18-2011, 08:08 PM   #17
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


Right now I am thinking of a real tricky approach that a friend of mine who is a bridge engineer says it should work IF it can be implemented.

Here is a sketch of what I am thinking.



First, go outside to where the beam ends on the roof overhang, use a 4x4 with a bottle jack and a steel plate to jack up the overhang until it is tight and snug.

Next, remove the sister beam behind the rotted beam, and cut out the rotted section completely. Leave a portion of the beam on the left side.

Next, go back outside and crank the jack a little to raise a small amount, say 1/4" or so. This should relieve the weight on the beam from the outside.

Next, use a drill to drill two 1/2" holes into the beam along the axis of the beam on both sides. Drill deep into the 2x6 for at least six to eight inches. This is going to be tricky as with all the conduits and all this in this tight space, I am not sure I can position the drill at the correct angle to drill these deep holes. Drill two holes on the right beam, and two on the left beam. Clean out the saw dust in the holes.

Next, Inject epoxy adhesive into the holes, then insert two 1/2" rebars into the beam and let cure. The two rebars connect the two sections again.

Next, using two pieces of 1" thick plywood, cut to 2x6 dimensions, sister the beam on both sides, from the truss to the left all the way to the concrete wall and a foot or so beyond. Drill 3/8" holes through the "three-ply" wood on either sides and pass 3/8" bolts and tighten.

Next, nail a piece of plywood cross the bottom.

Pour in sawdust mixed with epoxy resin into the hollowed section in the middle. Fill it all the way to the top and let cure.

Remove the jack on the outside.

Last edited by miamicuse; 11-18-2011 at 08:23 PM.
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Old 11-18-2011, 09:27 PM   #18
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


Since this is structurally reliant I'll take a bet that before you do anything you have to have a permit and approval. . . I would talk with the permit office to determine what's acceptable and what's not while you're there.

Also - other info would be helpful.

1) Is this the only truss that extends out over the deck beyond this concrete wall?
2) If this is the only truss - what else supports the deck roof?
3) If this is not the only truss - where are the others? They're not visible in the photos.
4) How much area of roofing does this truss support? Estimated weight?
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:15 PM   #19
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


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Since this is structurally reliant I'll take a bet that before you do anything you have to have a permit and approval. . . I would talk with the permit office to determine what's acceptable and what's not while you're there.

Also - other info would be helpful.

1) Is this the only truss that extends out over the deck beyond this concrete wall?
2) If this is the only truss - what else supports the deck roof?
3) If this is not the only truss - where are the others? They're not visible in the photos.
4) How much area of roofing does this truss support? Estimated weight?
1) No, there are others, each spaced about six feet apart. It is not a truss. All the roof trusses run perpendicular to this beam. The series of beams that support the roof overhang are connected to the face of the double 2x10 trusses to the left. You don't see the other beams because they are all in the same position, one after another. The rotted one obscured the view of those behind them.

4) The dead load to the beam would be about six feet of width and four feet of length, a total of 24 SQ FT of plywood and concrete tiles. This is only the overhang portion. The actual weight in the attic portion is insignificant and is absorbed by the concrete wall, and the roof deck changes slope 1 foot inside of the wall to a steeper angle and that part rests on another truss which I did not show for simplicity sake. I estimate the dead load to be about 600 pounds. Conservatively we can say 1500 pounds dead and live loads combined.
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Old 11-19-2011, 02:16 PM   #20
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


That sounds like overkill. If you jack up the fascia end, the point where the rafter touches the wall will become the fulcrum, and the load will be where the two pitched roofs meet causing stress right there
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Old 11-19-2011, 04:30 PM   #21
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Best way to repair rotted structural wood member?


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That sounds like overkill. If you jack up the fascia end, the point where the rafter touches the wall will become the fulcrum, and the load will be where the two pitched roofs meet causing stress right there
Yes. It's going to be delicate.

If I don't offer any support outside, when I cut the rotted beam out the beam could stay put or the bearing load on the outside may cause it to tilt up a little.

I have to at least jack it to a point where it's snug and tight. May be I will push it just a little more may be not.

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