DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   Beadboard chair rail over uneven walls (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/beadboard-chair-rail-over-uneven-walls-38773/)

pmoe 02-20-2009 03:32 PM

Beadboard chair rail over uneven walls
 
I've googled everything I could thing of, but haven't seen this mentioned, although it has to be a common problem.

I'm remodeling a bathroom and want to do a 5' beadboard chair rail. I already have 4' of drywall at the top of the wall. I started putting up 1/2" OSB backer below that yesterday and ran into a problem where my backer is sitting out from the window frame on one side.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3546/...5d11494f_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3589/...fd68ee62_b.jpg

Of course, the reason for this is that the studs don't line up nicely down the wall.

Is there any way to "fix" this? Or to make up for the error when I go to place my beadboard?

DangerMouse 02-20-2009 03:53 PM

the first pic looks like there's foam behind it pushing it out? grab a steak knife and flatten it, if so.

DM

pmoe 02-20-2009 03:56 PM

There is foam behind it, but that's not what's pushing it out. The studs are off. This isn't the greatest picture, but you can see the gap behind the beadboard when it's sitting flush against the next stud over.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3365/...be886a7c_b.jpg

flyboy2610 02-20-2009 04:26 PM

How far off are the studs? You will probably need to pull the OSB and use a plumb line to determine how far off the studs are. Then your choice is to either trim the high studs back, if they are deep enough to do so and maintain structural integrity, or cut furring strips and bring the low studs out to the high ones. Which presents problem with the window framing being too far back from the wall surface, and the need to reset your outlet boxes. Or you could go along the wall and replace the studs one by one.
Personally, if it were me and studs would allow it, I'd trim the high ones back. You may be able to install a sister stud along side any that you trim back. Check with you building inspector before trimming the studs.
No matter what you do, you've got some work ahead of you. Good luck!

jogr 02-20-2009 05:04 PM

You're going to need to do some work on that window sill and side casing anyway cause it's a bit worn and when you put on the beadboard it'll probably all be proud of it out so it. So take off the osb and shim (or you could plane off high spots) to get a nice flat plane (particularly around the window).

You've got enough room to put a new bigger sill right on top of the old one (cut the old sill back so you can hide it behind the beadboard or a new piece of trim). Put on new wider side casing to meet the beardboard. So is the drywall and beadboard going to match up depth wise where they meet the window casing. If not you'll have to do a little additional work there.

Shamus 02-20-2009 05:22 PM

Good advice above.
I routinely see studs off parallel in the work we do on old homes. Take the time to bring that new wall out or trim studs back whichever will keep the window in line and parallel with your new wall. Maybe a little of both, but do it now before you regret it later. Might be worth it to make sure the window itself hasn’t moved as well.

If you just cut the sill your eye will pick-up the difference very quickly on the finished product and it will look like you did just that.
We’ve often ended up adding studs to an entire wall because things were so far out of line.

Willie T 02-20-2009 05:31 PM

You can easily "un-bow" a 2 x 4 by dropping your skill saw blade into the most protruding part of the bow.

Pull the saw out, and tow nail the top and bottom pieces back together. One cut almost always straightens out a stud. (not real good for bearing walls) :whistling2:

pmoe 02-20-2009 06:09 PM

Thanks for the responses.

I have some significant challenges here. The drywall at the top is already up (it more or less looks OK where it meets the window). Foam insulation, electrical, and plumbing are all in place. And some of the studs already have sisters to shore up some termite damage.

If I had my life to live over, I'd probably re-stud the wall and make it straighter. As it is, I'm not sure what the best course of action is. BTW, this is an exterior wall (an old porch that was framed up to be a bathroom).

These pictures aren't the greatest (it's hard to hold a camera in one hand and hold a level up, in a dark room), but will give you some idea of what's happening. It looks like the corner is sitting way out relative to the first stud.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3376/...0f632c47_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3458/...18a6c3af_b.jpg

Shamus 02-21-2009 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pmoe (Post 233810)
Thanks for the responses.

I have some significant challenges here. The drywall at the top is already up (it more or less looks OK where it meets the window). Foam insulation, electrical, and plumbing are all in place. And some of the studs already have sisters to shore up some termite damage.

If I had my life to live over, I'd probably re-stud the wall and make it straighter. As it is, I'm not sure what the best course of action is. BTW, this is an exterior wall (an old porch that was framed up to be a bathroom).


If the top portion is ok with drywall then leave it alone. Build out the bottom half (wainscoting)to level and parallel using shims, blocking, whatever you need to create a solid backing to nail to. Allow that bottom wall to stand proud of the top drywall and put a cap rail on the top. If you can you might even consider making the window sill as part of that cap.
http://i367.photobucket.com/albums/oo115/Zoftic/cap.jpg


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 AM.


Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved