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Old 11-13-2008, 08:31 PM   #1
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


I am (attempting) to build as set of stairs for my basement that I am going to finish. I am planning on buying the brackets and spacers from EZ Stairs.

http://www.ez-stairs.com/index.html


My question is:

What type wood should I purchase for the of 2X6 stringers?
What type of wood should I purchase for the risers?
What type of wood should I purchase for the treads???

Is there a specific size (thickness) should I get for the risers and treads???

I attached some pics of my existing beat up stairs if that has any relevance.




Any help would be much appreciated
Attached Thumbnails
Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs-img_2212.jpg   Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs-img_2213.jpg   Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs-img_2214.jpg  

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Old 11-13-2008, 11:13 PM   #2
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


If you prefer to use a bracket system, go ahead, but it is not hard to cut stair jacks at all. It is much more professional than a gimmick bracket system (and cheaper). To cut them yorself, you just need an L-shaped carpenters square, a circular saw, and a handsaw to finish the cuts.

Planning before cutting is very important no matter what you choose to do. I always draw a picture before cutting stairs.

Most stair jacks are 2x12.

What tread material you use depends on your preference. If you're carpeting the stairs, pre-made MDF treads are hard to beat. Buy them before you start so you can set the rise at the top and bottom correctly, knowing their thickness. Most are something like 1-1/4" thick x 11"-ish.

The riser blocks don't need to be thick. 1x material will usually be as thick as you can go, and still get your treads' run correct, and get the required nosing overhang.

When you're done, your rises shouldn't exceed 7-3/4", and no two rises should have more than 3/8" variance. Your runs should be at least 10", and that is measured horizontally from nose to nose, not riser block to nose. No two runs should vary more than 3/8". Your treads must overhang your risers at least 3/4" and not more than 1-1/4".

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Old 11-14-2008, 10:03 AM   #3
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


Thanks so much that was very helpful

How would you suggest I attach the top of the two stringers to the floor/header joist. Do I need a post underneath for support or can I screw/bolt the top riser into the joist????
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Old 11-14-2008, 03:35 PM   #4
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


I have seen the stringers attached in a couple of ways. One way is metal brackets and another is a peice of 3/4" plywood nailed to the stringers and then nailed to the stair opening framing. Another good tools i used to do mine was this website http://www.blocklayer.com/stairs/stairseng.aspx.
You just type in some measurements and it tells you your run and rise. Also remember to take into account the finished floor thicknesses when doing your calculations otherwise your top step will be thicker than the rest. I bought a book from barnes and noble for 15-20 bucks that helped alot on stair building. Also cut the first stringer and test fit it to make sure it works before you cut the others. Good Luck
Also i just re-read your last post and you mentioned 2 stringers. I'm not sure what the code or rule is but depending on how wide your stairs are i would use three stringers.

Last edited by ponch37300; 11-14-2008 at 03:37 PM.
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Old 12-08-2008, 09:13 AM   #5
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


Quote:
Originally Posted by thekctermite View Post
Planning before cutting is very important no matter what you choose to do. I always draw a picture before cutting stairs.
This should be at the top of your list. Measure many times to make sure you get the right figures.

For treads the wood should be very straight and dry. I usually run them through the planer before putting them together to make sure they don't have any twists, cupping or other imperfections. This is especially true if you plan to have bare wood.

I recently did a Juniper stairs that I cut on the portable mill. I let the wood dry for a year (since I don't have a kiln), then ran the stock through the planer to get them perfectly square and then put it together.
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Old 12-08-2008, 09:35 PM   #6
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


Stepper, I think you're biased! Very informative response however.

I am glad to hear they've received an ICC/ES report. That raises them above the average gimmick product in my opinion, although I don't see much of a necessity for this type of product in the average residential project. I don't imagine they'll become a jobsite staple.
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Old 02-24-2010, 06:21 PM   #7
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


I use the adjustable stair bracket system often because I like to work smart. It's an easy install and strong. Don't knock it till you try it. If you're building a lot of stairs, you can really work fast with these things.
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Old 02-24-2010, 08:39 PM   #8
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


Quote:
Originally Posted by Deckman100 View Post
I use the adjustable stair bracket system often because I like to work smart. It's an easy install and strong. Don't knock it till you try it. If you're building a lot of stairs, you can really work fast with these things.
I don't know DM,
I was always told by a buddy of mine one of the signs of a good carpenter was if was able to build a good set of stairs. I prefer to use a framing square and lay them out. It doesn't take that long once you do a number of them. Good practice and good satisfaction when you are done.
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Old 02-24-2010, 09:24 PM   #9
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Basement Stairs/ EZ Stairs


One word. Craftsmanship. I take pride in my ability to cut stairs, and cut them fast and accurate.

Some guys are happy with taking the faster/easier route. That isn't necessarily bad in all cases, including this one. Some prefer doing things they way they are done by true craftsmen.

Nothing wrong with a bracket system. It just isn't for everybody.

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