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Old 05-14-2011, 11:14 AM   #1
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Basement Framing


I've started framing my basement and so far so good.
My question is....is it VERY important to leave a gap in-between the top header and floor joist?
Most of my walls have a 1/4" gap but one of them is a tight fit because of a floor slope. I have yet to hammer it in because not sure if I need to take it down and cut a 1/4" of each stud. (Would be a nightmare!)
Thanks in advance for opinions!!

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Old 05-14-2011, 05:34 PM   #2
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Basement Framing


Don't pound in a wall that doesn't fit. I have seen this lift floor joists. If not it will definitely put a strong bow to your new studs. A tight fit is fine... but 1/4'' is too much. You should cut each stud but considering it doesn't sound like you are putting up a load bearing wall, you could always cut notches into your top plate of the new wall every 16" or so to fit around joists.

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Old 05-14-2011, 09:41 PM   #3
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Great IDEA!! Didn't even think about that!!!

THANKS!!!
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Old 05-14-2011, 09:45 PM   #4
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Basement Framing


Snug fit is ok. If it is so tight that it bows the stud, remove that particular stud, cut it shorter, and toe nail in place. Most of the time I install top and bottom plates and cut each stud in place.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:00 PM   #5
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Basement Framing


Quote:
Originally Posted by timthetoolman
Don't pound in a wall that doesn't fit. I have seen this lift floor joists. If not it will definitely put a strong bow to your new studs. A tight fit is fine... but 1/4'' is too much. You should cut each stud but considering it doesn't sound like you are putting up a load bearing wall, you could always cut notches into your top plate of the new wall every 16" or so to fit around joists.
How would I go about notching the top plate? What tools do you suggest?
Thanks.
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Old 05-16-2011, 01:06 PM   #6
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table saw works the best or you could use a router if you have one with the correct bit, just mark where your topplate it touching the joists and cut maybe a saw blade thickness extra on each side so you dont have to hammer the top plate on once you notch it
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brick_layer
table saw works the best or you could use a router if you have one with the correct bit, just mark where your topplate it touching the joists and cut maybe a saw blade thickness extra on each side so you dont have to hammer the top plate on once you notch it
A table saw? Like remove the top plate? All of the studs are nailed together.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:32 PM   #8
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If the ceiling height it’s inconsistent…build your wall on the spot
In other words attach a bottom and top plate and cut each stud on the spot.
Now in your case ...remove the top plate and measure each joist ...trim your studs to the smallest taken measurement taking in consideration top plate thickness.

Use shims to fill any gaps.

Done.

Notching a top plate in my opinion its just to much work...and unnecessary.
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Old 05-17-2011, 12:22 AM   #9
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Here is the problem...the wall is all nail gunned together. It will be quite the job to take the header piece off!! Not sure what to do now. :-/

Hard to tell from the picture but there is probably about 3 inches until the wall were it should be.
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Old 05-17-2011, 01:16 AM   #10
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Pull it down, remove top plate, cut them all, frame, add shims and sill sealer under bottom plate for a thermal/capillary break; http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-building-code
Use H.D. galv. nails in p.t. wood, add rigid foam board on concrete wall and rim joist first. Fire-stop top continuously and every 10' lineally per Code. Location establishes foam board thickness, Location?

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Old 05-17-2011, 03:10 AM   #11
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this has happened to me on a groggy monday morning in an unlevel basement

if it's just over the span of a couple studs where you are too tight, what i've found has worked is too remove those couple studs (use a sawzall, cut the nails at either bottom or top) slam the wall in, plumb it, make sure it's square, tack it, now put those couple studs back it, just toenail them.

if your basement isn't very level i'd go with the other advice on here and stickframe it.
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Old 05-17-2011, 09:45 AM   #12
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Basement floor is rarely perfectly level. You might be able to use this wall at a different location where the basement floor is a little lower.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:31 AM   #13
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Successfully notched the header piece. Super easy. Adjusted my skill saw to the lowest setting, made two cuts then just chipped away the notch.
Great solution!!

My next wall seems pretty short. Hope it will work!

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