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Old 07-28-2009, 05:20 PM   #1
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baseboard problem


Hi all,

I have an open concept house and so my maple floor hallway butts up against my family room tiled floor.

I'm installing new baseboards and base shoe in my home and didn't realize how much of a height difference there is between my wooden floors and tiled floors.

There are four places where I need to put baseboards where the wood/tile floor butt up. In Location 4, the height difference isn't so bad but the gap gets bigger as you head towards Location 1 as you may notice in the photos.

What should I do in this situation? Should I raise the baseboards on the wooden floor side to match the same height as baseboards on the tile side? Half of my house is on the wood floor so does that mean I have to raise the base boards for half my house?

Also, what about the base shoe? The last strip of wood floor slants up towards the tile floors and I'm not sure if the base shoe should slant up along the wood floor or how it should be.

Thanks.
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Old 07-28-2009, 05:43 PM   #2
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The small 6-8" piece of baseboard would be my start. I would work with the height of the baseboard on each side by custom fitting the small transition piece of baseboard at 1 thru 4. If carefully done it should be seamless, look great, and you may get a compliment or two as well. Look in the tile dept. for the proper tool used to trace out the edge of the uneven flooring if you can't eye it!

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Old 07-29-2009, 12:04 AM   #3
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Seems like ripping the taller side down on a table saw would solve this problem easily. Just cut the bottom off and install the baseboard so the tops line up throughout. You won't miss 1/4" in height.

At the beveled transition strip just use a simple compass to ride the bevel and make a pencil mark on the base. Then cut the mark with a jigsaw or a coping saw.
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Old 07-29-2009, 12:37 AM   #4
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I had a similar, but less pronounced, transition. In the photo the tile is approx 1/8 inch higher than the wood. It is in a very obvious wall so I needed the height difference to disappear.

I lifted the baseboard on the wood side to the higher height on the tile side. I then covered the gap with shoe mold. Done and invisible.

It may be a bit tougher with your situation but if you spend enough time fussing about it I'm sure you'll get it.
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Old 07-29-2009, 09:52 AM   #5
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In the first picture- -Considering that you have the base molding on the right hand side (you can see the back of it) throws a little kink into this. IF you cut the 6"-8" piece to match the transition, then you will have to cut all of the base mold in that room down to match the height, not a good idea. I would not cut the small piece to match the transition, I would raise the base on the left hand side to match and use shoe mold (as mentioned) to trim it out. The you will have to use shoe mold for all the base mold, I think it looks nice anyway. You will have to trim the shoe mold for the 6"-8" piece to match the transition area. It appears in the other pictures you have the same problem with the base turning corners and the height of the base dictating the project. Bottom line is that I recommend placing all of the base mold the same height and using shoe mold to cover any gaps on the bottom of the base molding. Good Luck, David
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Old 07-29-2009, 10:24 AM   #6
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Hey! Whatever works for ya! My eye just sees a simple 3-5 or(187-185) degree notch cut at the transition. Don't fret about the height of one side or the other, this wall or that wall. The end result will be a sweet little little optical illusion that becomes of your dilemna! Try one edge, step back, and look! It's the little things like that can grab attentive eyes to small detail. The uniformity will come together when each one is neatly done making the transition flow from floor to floor not baseboard to baseboard or wall to wall.

Can you see it yet?
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Old 07-29-2009, 10:42 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by derf36 View Post
I had a similar, but less pronounced, transition. In the photo the tile is approx 1/8 inch higher than the wood. It is in a very obvious wall so I needed the height difference to disappear.

I lifted the baseboard on the wood side to the higher height on the tile side. I then covered the gap with shoe mold. Done and invisible.

It may be a bit tougher with your situation but if you spend enough time fussing about it I'm sure you'll get it.



Seamless! Well done! Dammit, your hired!
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Old 07-29-2009, 01:30 PM   #8
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You can case the openings. This will eliminate unsightly shoe moulding transitions and accent the opening. You will obviously have to scribe your 1x to the floor. Speaking of scribing, if your not installing shoe or quarter round you should consider scribing the base to the floor, it looks a lot nicer.

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