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Old 07-19-2009, 03:53 PM   #16
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Baseboard coped edge


One more question on this subject. I have a closet to do in the same room. I got a little or maybe no issue but I will ask anyway. I will have one back pc with butt cuts on both sides and then the right and left pc's will both be coped to the butt cuts. Now there is a 1" gap between the colonial on the door trim. Should I even bother to put a 1" pc in there. The baseboard is a 1/2" thick so there would be a 1/2" space between the colonial door trim and the baseboard. I can't see putting a 1/2" pc of baseboard that is coped. There was a little piece previously when there were square 3" baseboard but with the profile of this baseboard should I do it or not?

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Old 07-19-2009, 04:21 PM   #17
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OK there will be an additional fee for this NEW question;

Yes. Is the answer. Same method as the previous question. the space in a closet is no different than one in a room just that normally the closet is smaller To do the returns simply cope the end of an oversized pc, fit per instructions and glue it instead of nailing
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Old 07-19-2009, 04:33 PM   #18
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Guess I will have to get some liquid nails LOL
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Old 07-19-2009, 04:59 PM   #19
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Dumb question but do I just glue the back of the small piece and put it to the wall or should I glue all 3 sides of it?
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Old 07-19-2009, 09:01 PM   #20
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There are no dumb questions, only smart ass answers from a nutcracker ROFLMAO
I just use good ole Tbond II works fine. "liquid Nails" LOL good one.
However in reality glue like that is too thick, will not allow you to get it tight to wall. IF you can find it the best is Titebond "molding" glue. That is not the exact name but close enuf for you to recognize it when you see it, it is made just for moldings etc, heavier body and quick grab and tack. It is kinda hard to find but Blowes and Home Dumpo usually has it.

Just for you thweetie I went into shop and the correct name is "TITEBOND WOOD MOLDING GLUE"

Last edited by skymaster; 07-19-2009 at 09:04 PM. Reason: nudder comment
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Old 07-19-2009, 09:07 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by skymaster View Post
ARI001: eNCLOSED PLEASE FIND 57 BAZILLION DOLLARS IN CASH PER OUR CONTRACT FOR CONSULTING FEES IN THE "ADVANCED TRIM SCHOOL CLASS 07/2009.
THANK YOU AGAIN FOR YOUR SUPERIOR KNOWLEDGE AND ASSISTANCE IN THIS ENDEAVOR
Thank you,
Now I can get a bigger miter saw!
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Old 07-19-2009, 09:26 PM   #22
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U izzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz most welcome :}:}:}:} Tho I should tell ya, not to make you cry, I have 6 of em ROFLMAO Go shopping!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! lol lol lol lol. Sadly tho I am so old now I dont use em much anymore ROFLMFAO
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Old 07-20-2009, 08:28 AM   #23
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Baseboard coped edge


I think you guys were drinking just a little too much over the weekend.

This is the best way to run the base.... (I've done this hundreds/thousands of times over the last 10 years, it's the correct way to do it. (to the op: no one's gonna arrest you if you do it differently ).
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Old 07-20-2009, 08:30 AM   #24
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Also, if you're going to be doing much more work, pick up one of these to find your angles. It gives you the miter angle to set your saw at exactly for either a single piece, or 2 mitered pieces, it will save you a lot of time.

http://www.amazon.com/Starrett-505A-.../dp/B0000DCBLW

They also carry a smaller version which will fit in a toolbelt.
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Old 07-20-2009, 09:31 AM   #25
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Jay,
If you run the trim like that when the wood contracts (it will sooner or later) a small gap will become visible upon entering the room. That is why you always run your copes along the path of the eye when entering a room. Also you want to avoid double copes if you can. If you are going to caulk and paint the trim you may get away with installing the trim backwards like that. The way that we are explaining the procedure is "textbook" and generally considered the proper way to run trim.
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Old 07-20-2009, 09:38 AM   #26
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sorry, if that were the case then you would just miter all your joints. A cope is meant to have pressure on it, that's what keeps it from opening up.

A cope without pressure on it is about as useless as a miter when it comes to eventually showing gaps.
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Old 07-20-2009, 10:30 AM   #27
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sorry, if that were the case then you would just miter all your joints. A cope is meant to have pressure on it, that's what keeps it from opening up.

A cope without pressure on it is about as useless as a miter when it comes to eventually showing gaps.
No because a miter does not allow you any control as to where the gap may be seen. It is all about perception. A miter that opens up can be seen at any angle. A cope allows you to control from what position of the room a gap may be visible. Either method used you want the joints to fit snugly when you install them. However as I have stated, eventually the wood will expand and contract as is the nature of wood. When it does so gaps at some point are inevitable somewhere in the trim job. In addition applying to much pressure to a coped joint can damage the profile.
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Old 07-20-2009, 10:39 AM   #28
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Of course it can, who said anything about applying too much pressure? It comes down to knowing your work. Like anything else after you've learned the proper way to do something and do it for a number of years it becomes second nature.

Coping can be difficult for a first timer (wait until the op gets into some crown), but it just takes a little practice (and swearing, probably ) to become proficient.

If that room was a square (meaning there would be some pressure at the joint where there are now outside miters), yes you would cope the 2 side pieces. But the layout of the room dictates that the back piece is coped, as there will be NO pressure on the joint if the side pieces are coped into the back piece.
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Old 07-20-2009, 10:55 AM   #29
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Jay; If working backwards makes you happy then enjoy. All I can say is that I have been doing this for a tad more than a week or two, 30 yrs to be closer and if what you say is true then there are close to a thousand houses that I have to go back to and tear the trim out of
The way myself and arI describe is the best way we have found that doesnt mean yours isnt right to you just that your methoc will always show the joints and never look right.
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Old 07-20-2009, 11:29 AM   #30
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You must not have seen many good copes. Your way is the one most likely to open up because there is no pressure on the joint. (and I've been doing this a # of years myself for my own business as well).

We'll just have to agree to disagree, nothing wrong with that.

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