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Old 08-22-2007, 11:41 PM   #1
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


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Last edited by nrabate; 05-11-2010 at 08:04 PM. Reason: no longer applies
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Old 08-23-2007, 05:28 AM   #2
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


Removing the 1/2" of sheetrock on a particular area of connected wall is a common practice for cabinetry that is a little larger than the measured area.

Unless this is a fire-rated partition wall with 5/8" S/R in a "multi-unit" structure (apts or condos), there is no issue with "codes" regarding the removal of such sheetrock in order to accomodate the cabinets.

Good Luck.

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Old 08-23-2007, 10:11 AM   #3
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


Thank you so much!
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Old 08-26-2007, 10:46 PM   #4
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


from a firefighters standpoint, how much drywall was removed. If the cabinets are over the oven, knock on wood but if there is an oven fire, your cabinets will be the first thing to catch. And they burn easy with all the chemicals coated on them. Basically what im getting at here is that you have no fire protection in an area that is most likely to catch fire in your house. Once the back of the cabinet goes, its already inside the walls, an exterior wall no less. There is no worse place to have a fire then inside your walls.
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Old 08-27-2007, 09:07 AM   #5
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
Removing the 1/2" of sheetrock on a particular area of connected wall is a common practice for cabinetry that is a little larger than the measured area.
"Measure twice, cut once": all I'm gonna say about that.

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Unless this is a fire-rated partition wall with 5/8" S/R in a "multi-unit" structure (apts or condos), there is no issue with "codes" regarding the removal of such sheetrock in order to accomodate the cabinets.
Even in a single-family, I think R702.1 might apply. Unless you want to claim the back of the cabinets acts as wooden panelling? In which case, the backs had better be more than 1/4" thick as per R702.5.
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Old 08-27-2007, 07:41 PM   #6
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


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Originally Posted by frenchie View Post
"Measure twice, cut once": all I'm gonna say about that.
Sometimes, if you are the cabinet fabricator, you are at the mercy of other's work.

This is a sad truth that exists on "some" job sites: things can get built improperly by subcontractors, including framing and drywall.

Additionally, onsite changes are sometimes made by ''others'' to accomodate larger diameter drain lines, or a beam that came in wider than originally specked- out on the plans.
Thus, walls can (rarely) be (but shouldn't be) 1/2" off, and since cabinets are usually designed and ordered a minimum of 6 weeks in advance of the onsite delivery date, things can go wrong.
When the fabricator has built the cabinets using the specs they were given on the order, then, it's not the cabinet makers fault, no matter how many times he or she measured and reviewed the plans/prints - and cut once....
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Originally Posted by frenchie View Post
Even in a single-family, I think R702.1 might apply. Unless you want to claim the back of the cabinets acts as wooden panelling? In which case, the backs had better be more than 1/4" thick as per R702.5.
All shop fabricated cabinet sides and backs are a minimum of 1/4" in thickness.
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:39 PM   #7
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
Sometimes, if you are the cabinet fabricator, you are at the mercy of other's work.

This is a sad truth that exists on "some" job sites: things can get built improperly by subcontractors, including framing and drywall.

Additionally, onsite changes are sometimes made by ''others'' to accomodate larger diameter drain lines, or a beam that came in wider than originally specked- out on the plans.
Thus, walls can (rarely) be (but shouldn't be) 1/2" off, and since cabinets are usually designed and ordered a minimum of 6 weeks in advance of the onsite delivery date, things can go wrong.
When the fabricator has built the cabinets using the specs they were given on the order, then, it's not the cabinet makers fault, no matter how many times he or she measured and reviewed the plans/prints - and cut once....

All shop fabricated cabinet sides and backs are a minimum of 1/4" in thickness.
Take that Frenchie!!!!
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Old 08-28-2007, 10:01 AM   #8
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Attaching kitchen cabinets directly to studs with no drywall between


Jiggy - Do I know you from somewhere, or are you just 12 years old? Trying to have a conversation over here.


Atlantic - Before I get bogged down in the details, I have to say you were right that there's no code provision against it:

http://www.iccsafe.org/cgi-bin/ultim...=000554#000000

Came as a lesson to me. I'm still not sure my inspector wouldn't bring up the model energy code's air-sealing provisions... I'll have to ask, next time I see him.

Anyways, I think you got the wrong idea - where did I say this was the cabinet maker's fault? It's clearly the designer's fault, no question about that.

You said this was common practise; but I've never heard of anyone doing it, and it never would have occured to me to do it. But then I can't imagine having the need: most kitchen layouts I've seen have an inch or two's allowance already designed-in, for out-of-plumb walls and/or measurement screwups... I take it you don't use filler strips at all?

Oh course, the lack of allowance makes sense: coming from a designer who forgot there'd be sheetrock on the wall...

BTW, I have seen 1/8th backs on shop-built cabs. Maybe all of yours have minimum 1/4, but that doesn't mean it's a universal.

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