DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Carpentry (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/)
-   -   attaching baseboard trim (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/attaching-baseboard-trim-13774/)

DIY4EVER 11-26-2007 08:20 AM

attaching baseboard trim
 
Hello all!

Well, I am on the home stretch of a 6 month basement finishing project. I studded the walls, ran some electric, insulated, drywalled, painted, hung all doors....now its time to trim!!! I hate trim!!!!! I love how it looks but hate to install it. I started the baseboard trim yesterday.....i already have the door casings up. Is there a "best" way to install the baseboard trim? I have been nailing it near the botom edge so that the nail hits the meat of the bottom plate of the walls. At the ends of each piece I place two nails, one at the bottom one at the top, then run the length of the piece wiht nails at the bottom edge. Then I set the nails, fill, sand, and paint, right? I am using MDF trim, I know there may be some controversy over that (MDF vs. solid wood) but MDF was in my budget and thats that. Any tips/tricks/hints would be greatly appreciated!!!!

Thansk in advance!
DIY4EVER

Daryl 11-26-2007 09:29 AM

Generally two nails are installed in each stud location. prior to drywall i like to take my speed square and rest it against the bottom plate and stike a line for each stud w/ a sharpie marker or make a defined line w/ a carpenters pencil. these marks will assist and remain through out the drywall and trim phase leaving you to never "guess" where the studs are. you have 1/2 the nailing pattern correct. the bottom nail is driven into the bottom plate, and the top nail is driven into the stud. "IF" you are running taller base it is suggested a third nail is added in the center of the nailing pattern.

what are you doing about inside corners? are you mitering them or coping them?


Regards

-Daryl

RTRCon 11-26-2007 09:29 AM

We will normally find a wall plug(elec) figure out what side the stud is on and run your tape out on the ground next to the piece to be nailed and nail every 16", high and low. If your going to install carpet later, put the base up on 1/2" scrap blocks so the carpet gets tucked under the base. I like to install the outside corners first, and also the smaller pieces, then put the longer inside corners last. Good luck with your project:thumbup:

Daryl 11-26-2007 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RTRCon (Post 76253)
We will normally find a wall plug(elec) figure out what side the stud is on and run your tape out on the ground next to the piece to be nailed and nail every 16", high and low. If your going to install carpet later, put the base up on 1/2" scrap blocks so the carpet gets tucked under the base. I like to install the outside corners first, and also the smaller pieces, then put the longer inside corners last. Good luck with your project:thumbup:

great suggestion i completely forgot about packing up for carpet.

:thumbsup:

dont forget to glue the outside corners and splice joints or they WILL open up!!

RTRCon 11-26-2007 09:43 AM

Quote:

dont forget to glue the outside corners and splice joints or they WILL open up!!
Yep my bad.. We glue everything.. MDF will shrink,in cold weather, it should be climetized a few days before install.

The Home Doc 11-26-2007 06:03 PM

Are you hand nailing or shooting them with a finish nailer?

DIY4EVER 11-26-2007 06:34 PM

unfortunatley, hand nailing

MinConst 11-26-2007 06:44 PM

On the long runs cut them a bit 1/8" long. They will be nice and tight at the corners. When I build a wall I use a double sole plate so I don't have to find the studs.

You must feel good the majority of your basement is done. Great job. We need pictures now.

The Home Doc 11-26-2007 07:58 PM

If you are having a hard time with finding studs, you can always use a technique an old carpenter showed me (providing you know someone you can borrow a finish nailer from or maybe rent one if you have a lot of use for it to offset the cost). Shoot two nails at intersecting 45 degree angles. This will lock it into place through the drywall. It sounds like it would be a loose hold, but it really does hold strong.

send_it_all 11-26-2007 08:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Home Doc (Post 76463)
If you are having a hard time with finding studs, you can always use a technique an old carpenter showed me (providing you know someone you can borrow a finish nailer from or maybe rent one if you have a lot of use for it to offset the cost). Shoot two nails at intersecting 45 degree angles. This will lock it into place through the drywall. It sounds like it would be a loose hold, but it really does hold strong.

I have installed miles of trim using this method. I buy a case of latex painters caulk and put a bead on the back top of the molding so it acts as an adhesive. So the nails only need to hold until it dries. It is pretty strong.

The Home Doc 11-26-2007 08:12 PM

Ooops... lol... can't believe I left the caulk out of it. Ha Ha. Guess I'm getting old. One other thing I meant to mention, don't worry about getting the joints absolutely tight. It is important that they are very close, but if you are painting the trim (which you are if you are using MDF) then you can caulk any gaps that are present and when sanded and painted, you'll never know.

DIY4EVER 11-28-2007 01:31 PM

thanks for all the help guys. the joints are coming out pretty tight but I already have the caulk gun ready to go over all the joints when its all hung.

I have pics but they excede the size limit that is in the thread about attaching a photo to a post, they are like 1000 kb. Is there another way to post pics?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:41 AM.