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Old 01-27-2007, 07:18 PM   #1
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Applying Crown Molding


I'm a newbie, been hanging out in the paint room but now I'm ready to apply some crown molding. It's a pretty straight-forward application, just an oblong room.

My measurements indicated the walls are less than 1/4" difference on both the long side and short side.

Does anyone have any pearls of wisdom to share? I do have a mitre box kit.


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Old 01-27-2007, 07:32 PM   #2
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Applying Crown Molding


I should have added that I'm not using regular crown molding, I want to apply the molding to the wall at the ceiling height. I think the kind of molding I got is casing. It's not fancy.


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Old 01-27-2007, 08:34 PM   #3
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Applying Crown Molding


If you are dead set on using the trim that you have purchased, I would suggest that you cut shallow rabbets into the back of the trim. Cut about 1/16" -1/8" in depth about every other 1/8" in distance. I would also suggest that you experiment with this technique a little to get it just right.

This takes away some of the ridgidity in the trim's stock and allows it to bend slightly. This is standard practice in the industry when attempting to bend most materials.

Also, you should use an adhesive when applying the actual trim work to the wall.

..... Other than that, I would suggest that you consider MDF or composite based trim work since it is more flexible.
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst.; 01-27-2007 at 10:38 PM. Reason: misspellings
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Old 01-27-2007, 08:45 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by AtlanticWBConst. View Post
If you are dead set on using the trim that you have purchased, I would suggest that you cut shallow rabbets into the back of the trim. Cut about 1/16" -1/8" in depth about every other 1/8" in distance. I would also suggest that you experiment with this technique a little to get it just right.

This takes away some of the ridgity in the stock and allows is to bend slightly. This is standard practice in the industry when attempting to bend most materials.

Also, you should use an adhesive when applying the actual trim work to the wall.

..... Other than that, I would suggest that you consider MDF or composite based trim work since it is more flexible.
Did I miss something in the post? Why would he need to kerf the back of the mouilding, there was no mention of curved application.
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Old 01-27-2007, 09:05 PM   #5
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By the Poster's statement of the room's shape: Oblong

Assuming that this room is in fact oblong: All 4 corners slightly curved.
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Old 01-27-2007, 10:09 PM   #6
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Did I miss something in the post? Why would he need to kerf the back of the mouilding, there was no mention of curved application.
BTW - In my initial response to the Poster - I instructed a rabbet cut ("U" shaped) ... .. ?? - I Didn't 'say' a kerf ("L" shaped) ....???
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Old 01-28-2007, 11:24 AM   #7
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I believe shapeshifter means a room that is not square. If i am right on this you should cope.
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Old 01-28-2007, 01:48 PM   #8
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I believe shapeshifter means a room that is not square. If i am right on this you should cope.
Someone doesn't know about dictionary.com
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Old 01-28-2007, 01:52 PM   #9
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I gotta laugh at the fact that you went through the trouble of looking it up and then scanning it into your computer....

Anyways:

Here are other definitions:

1.elongated, usually from the square or circular form. 2.in the form of a rectangle one of whose dimensions is greater than the other.

3. having a shape that is longer than it is wide, especially a rectangular or roughly elliptical shape

4. something with a length greater than its width, especially a rectangle or distorted circle



So, it can actually mean both, I understood it to mean rounded at the corners, since that would be the most perplexing for DIYers, rather than angled or other uneven corners.

Well, we will just have to wait and see what the original poster was actually writing about....
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Old 01-28-2007, 05:50 PM   #10
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Okay, guys, my "oblong" room is 97 1/4" by 65 1/2". Maybe I should have called it a rectangular room.

In any case, my plan is to nail the molding about 3/4" below the ceiling, flat against the wall, mitering the corners. It really isn't crown molding and the corners are not coved.

Sooooo
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Old 01-29-2007, 02:34 AM   #11
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If you're going to miter the corners make a couple of test pieces from scrap. Cut them both at 45 just like the meeting pieces should be and try them in the corners. If the corners are not exactly 90's then adjust your miter cuts splitting the difference. When you get the angle right make a note. It won't take long to check four corners.

The celing probably runs up and down a bit; they all do. So you can use a level to draw a reference line on the wall all the way around or just start at the right height and use your level to keep the molding level as you nail it off.

Coping the corners is the right way to go but if you don't know how you can do a nice job with miters. To reduce the chance of the corners opening with the seasons put wood glue in the miters. And keep some thin cardboard handy for shims since the walls probably aren't exactly vertical. With your design shimming the molding away from the wall at the top won't be visible and if you have to shim at the bottom then a little painters caulk will answer.

Molding is all about tight joints so buy an extra 25% of molding. If you make a mistake tear it down and use the extra piece to make it right.

Jan
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Old 01-29-2007, 07:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jan View Post
If you're going to miter the corners make a couple of test pieces from scrap. Cut them both at 45 just like the meeting pieces should be and try them in the corners. If the corners are not exactly 90's then adjust your miter cuts splitting the difference. When you get the angle right make a note. It won't take long to check four corners.

The celing probably runs up and down a bit; they all do. So you can use a level to draw a reference line on the wall all the way around or just start at the right height and use your level to keep the molding level as you nail it off.

Coping the corners is the right way to go but if you don't know how you can do a nice job with miters. To reduce the chance of the corners opening with the seasons put wood glue in the miters. And keep some thin cardboard handy for shims since the walls probably aren't exactly vertical. With your design shimming the molding away from the wall at the top won't be visible and if you have to shim at the bottom then a little painters caulk will answer.

Molding is all about tight joints so buy an extra 25% of molding. If you make a mistake tear it down and use the extra piece to make it right.

Jan
...Couldn't have said it better...

(only thing to add: your test pieces should be at least 1'-0" long, so as to get a realistic fit that conforms to the actual alignment of the walls and corners. If your test pieces are too short, they are not going to give you that 'true' alignment ....)
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Old 01-29-2007, 09:02 AM   #13
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http://www.thefreedictionary.com/
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Old 01-29-2007, 02:05 PM   #14
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Applying Crown Molding


To all who have taken the time to reply, my thanks!

I got out my miter box and some spare molding and did some practice cuts. For the most part, the joints are not that much out of square.

I suspect that this project might be a tad easier if I had a helper, correct? I don't seem to have been born with enough hands.

I'm a bit confused by the reply from RussellF. Not quite sure how an on-line dictionary is supposed to help.

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Old 01-29-2007, 03:08 PM   #15
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I use protractors made for carpentry. http://www.carptool.com/protractor.php

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