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-   -   2 Door Garage to a 1 Door Garage? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f14/2-door-garage-1-door-garage-64845/)

jpearson311 02-19-2010 09:35 AM

2 Door Garage to a 1 Door Garage?
 
I currently have a 2 door garage, but I want to convert it to a 1 door. I'm currently in the process of raising my rafters, but when I'm done, they're going to be significantly higher than the header of my garage door(s). Is this a problem? Is there anything significant I should take into consideration when converting from the 2 door to a 1 door? Thanks!

JP

firehawkmph 02-19-2010 09:48 AM

Jp,
As long as the header is properly sized and constructed for the opening width and what it has to support above, it should be fine. I've done this before. It ususally involves building a temorary wall a couple of feet in to suppport everyting above while you remove the old headers and install a new one.
When building the rough opening for the new door, size it to the size of the door. For example, a 16' x 7' door requires a 16' x 7' rough opening. Then when you put your jambs on (3/4") and apply your vinyl stops, you end up with a nice overlap on the outside. You need aprox. 14" above the door opening to the nearest overhead obstruction to fit 12" radius track and have the door clear. If you have a lot more room up above and plan on doing auto work with a lift involved, they make hi-lift track, which adds a vertical section in between the lower section of track (uprights) and the horizontal rails. This raises the door up closer to the ceiling and provides more headroom. You have to go to a real garage door company to get this, not a big box store.
Mike Hawkins:)

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by firehawkmph (Post 402541)
Jp,
As long as the header is properly sized and constructed for the opening width and what it has to support above, it should be fine. I've done this before. It ususally involves building a temorary wall a couple of feet in to suppport everyting above while you remove the old headers and install a new one.
When building the rough opening for the new door, size it to the size of the door. For example, a 16' x 7' door requires a 16' x 7' rough opening. Then when you put your jambs on (3/4") and apply your vinyl stops, you end up with a nice overlap on the outside. You need aprox. 14" above the door opening to the nearest overhead obstruction to fit 12" radius track and have the door clear. If you have a lot more room up above and plan on doing auto work with a lift involved, they make hi-lift track, which adds a vertical section in between the lower section of track (uprights) and the horizontal rails. This raises the door up closer to the ceiling and provides more headroom. You have to go to a real garage door company to get this, not a big box store.
Mike Hawkins:)

Ok Mike, I think I'm following you here, but I have a couple of questions.

1. Where/How do I connect the new header?

2. Where/How do I connect the temporary wall?

3. What are jambs?

4. What are vinyl stops?

Thanks!

JP

<*(((>< 02-19-2010 10:30 AM

Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.

tpolk 02-19-2010 10:34 AM

are you the poster who just had everyone jumping thru hoops for a solutin on moving your 2x up 16"? now you tell us you are raising the rafters? whats up with that

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tpolk (Post 402575)
are you the poster who just had everyone jumping thru hoops for a solutin on moving your 2x up 16"? now you tell us you are raising the rafters? whats up with that

Sorry tpolk, I mistyped. I'm raising my joists, not my rafters. Alls good.

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <*(((>< (Post 402570)
Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.

There is no second story above the garage. There are rafters that hold lumber, etc, but thats it. The garage is detached and is 20'x20'. I haven't picked a door yet, but if my garage is 20x20, what do you suggest? Bigger is better ;).

JP

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by <*(((>< (Post 402570)
Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.

Oh and won't a newly installed header keep it from racking when I remove the center wall? My buddy told me to get 2 2x12x20s, sister them and then hang them on the last wall studs closest to the door. Is this correct?

tpolk 02-19-2010 10:43 AM

thanks for the clarity, timothy

tpolk 02-19-2010 10:44 AM

you will need LVL

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tpolk (Post 402588)
you will need LVL

LVL? A level?

tpolk 02-19-2010 10:46 AM

lvl structural lumber for that span and load, lumber company can do calcs but they will need all load info

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tpolk (Post 402591)
lvl structural lumber for that span and load, lumber company can do calcs but they will need all load info

How do I find the load? I know the span.

tpolk 02-19-2010 10:55 AM

you will need to give them size of ceiling joist with span, roof material and rafter size with pitch of roof and what your attic storage expectations are,does roof have a structural ridge, Im guessing no from previous post. anything that will put load on header

jpearson311 02-19-2010 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tpolk (Post 402601)
you will need to give them size of ceiling joist with span, roof material and rafter size with pitch of roof and what your attic storage expectations are,does roof have a structural ridge, Im guessing no from previous post. anything that will put load on header

Well, my current span is 22.5" and it wouldn't change if I hung a new header or? Not sure what my roof material is. My roof is 5/12 22.5 degree pitch. The rafters are 2x4s. What is a structural ridge? My storage expectations are minimal. I'm not planning on putting a lot up there.


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