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Wildie 02-17-2012 09:36 PM

WiFi Antenna
 
I have my daughter connected to my home network!
Her house is approx. 200' away from mine.
At her end, I have a TPlink 722N (usb) connected to about 15' of coax cable, running outside to the TPLink antenna.
At my end I have a DLink N router. There is a direct line of sight, through a window, between the two.
The connection gives about 2 bars on the signal strength icon.
From time to time, if the weather isn't cooperative, it fails to connect.
I would like to install an antenna at my daughters end, that would give me a more reliable signal.
I would be interested if anybody knows of a suitable antenna for this purpose. Either manufactured or home built.

BigJim 02-17-2012 10:47 PM

Here is a link to a wireless booster that will work better than the high gain antennas. http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-.../dp/B000085BD7

Wildie 02-18-2012 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jiju1943 (Post 856321)
Here is a link to a wireless booster that will work better than the high gain antennas. http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-.../dp/B000085BD7


Thank you for the link! It never occured to me that electronic boosters were available.
Are thes located with the router or can they be located at the distant location also?

bbo 02-18-2012 11:22 AM

also look up directional antenna
http://www.radiolabs.com/products/wi...ss-antenna.php

and for better reliability, you can hook up two wireless routers or access points as wireless bridges.

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Client_Bridged

BigJim 02-18-2012 01:05 PM

I put the router at one PC and the booster at the other one.

Wildie 02-18-2012 10:29 PM

Thanks everybody for your tips. Lots of info to digest and it may take me awhile! When I make a decision and have tried it out, I'll post back!

user1007 02-19-2012 06:56 PM

URL did not work. Sorry.

Wildie 02-22-2012 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 857697)
URL did not work. Sorry.


??????????????? Worked for me! :yes:

BigJim 02-22-2012 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 857697)
URL did not work. Sorry.

It worked for me too.

Weird_T_Figure 02-23-2012 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie (Post 856277)
I have my daughter connected to my home network!
Her house is approx. 200' away from mine.
At her end, I have a TPlink 722N (usb) connected to about 15' of coax cable, running outside to the TPLink antenna.
At my end I have a DLink N router. There is a direct line of sight, through a window, between the two.
The connection gives about 2 bars on the signal strength icon.
From time to time, if the weather isn't cooperative, it fails to connect.
I would like to install an antenna at my daughters end, that would give me a more reliable signal.
I would be interested if anybody knows of a suitable antenna for this purpose. Either manufactured or home built.

Just run an ethernet wire underground... that's what I would do.

Chaining Wifi is bound to run into frustration.

DavesWS6 02-24-2012 10:12 AM

^ I agree.

I would just get a spool of ethernet cable and run it 6" underground, then connect it to a second router/switch for the connectivity in the second home. It will give a faster and more reliable connection for the secondary home. A signal booster is a nice alternative, but then you are ensuring that more people near your home are able to access your connection; even if it is secured, which any wireless connection should be, you want to minimize the amount of people who can be in range to see and possible access your connection.

Wildie 02-28-2012 07:37 PM

I found a simple, workable solution to my problem.

I made reflectors from aluminum sheet stock that are mounted 1" behind the Dlink router antenna's.
I cut the aluminum into 7" squares and bent them into a curve that had the cord about 2" from the aluminum.
To mount the two reflectors I cut styrofoam blocks to fit the curve and taped these to the reflectors, centered between the top and bottom.
I drilled a hole in the blocks and slid the reflectors onto the antenna's.

Originally, the signal was a maximum of 2 bars (40%) but with the reflectors it went to 3 bars (60%) and now connects reliably.

Total cost=$0

titanoman 02-29-2012 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie
I found a simple, workable solution to my problem.

I made reflectors from aluminum sheet stock that are mounted 1" behind the Dlink router antenna's.
I cut the aluminum into 7" squares and bent them into a curve that had the cord about 2" from the aluminum.
To mount the two reflectors I cut styrofoam blocks to fit the curve and taped these to the reflectors, centered between the top and bottom.
I drilled a hole in the blocks and slid the reflectors onto the antenna's.

Originally, the signal was a maximum of 2 bars (40%) but with the reflectors it went to 3 bars (60%) and now connects reliably.

Total cost=$0

You must be an antennologist to think of something like this.
Amazing that it helps.

Wildie 02-29-2012 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by titanoman (Post 866455)
You must be an antennologist to think of something like this.
Amazing that it helps.

I've been tinkering with using surplus satellite TV dishes for wifi, but had little success. With these I had to run coax outside to a dish and although they did work, the dishes weren't an improvement over the router antenna's. probably because of the cable loses.
With the antenna reflectors, there is no concern about cabling.

Ironlight 03-01-2012 10:24 PM

I would bet also that the dishes are too large.

Given that N standard antennae are more complex than the older B and G antennae you probably did the best thing available by shielding/reflecting the existing hardware.


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