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Old 02-03-2010, 03:35 AM   #16
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You know, for $5/month you can register, host and password protect your own domain. This will allow you to set up (and change at any time) your own private email accounts away from the AOL, google, yahoo, etc. madness. You will have bandwith for a website if you want one and there are even templates for creating such things. Many more bells and whistles too. At least policies for using the mailboxes are your own! One would think a hacker would not be spending much attention looking to get into individual domain email sections when attacking a biggy is much more glamorous and fun?

Obviously, you still need an internet connection from somebody.

How much is AOL these days? I guess gmail is still free? Yahoo comes with a lot of hosting plans I guess? Do you trust the security of any of them? $5/month for your own hosted domain is one cup of fancy Starbuck's coffee!

I actually did this because I needed a website anyhow but also because the idiot phone company kept renaming itself and eliminating the email addresses attached to the old name. On one occassion they simply dropped all the mailboxes when they made the switch.

Here is just one possibility for inexpensive web hosting. Their hatchling plan is $4.95/month. I happen to use Startlogic and have for years with no complaints.

http://www.hostgator.com/shared.shtml


Last edited by user1007; 02-03-2010 at 04:01 AM.
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Old 02-03-2010, 07:35 AM   #17
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I don't use Facebook or any of the online sites like that
I have enough walls in my house that need attention

Getting your own domain is a great idea...I have 3 domains
I bought one - 10 years it was I think about $50 to register the site
The other 2 I received from 1&1 when hosting my site

I can have up to 1200 e-mail address
I add & delete them as needed
I can create one just for signing up on a web-site for something
Then delete it when I no longer need it
Keeps the spam down
Plus the hosting company (1 & 1) also filters out spam
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Old 02-03-2010, 08:20 AM   #18
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Didn't know 1&1 was still around. They used to have a good rep and they were one of the first to bundle hosting with user interfaces that were helpful as I remember. My Startlogic account lets me nest as many domains, each with unlimited email accounts, as I want under the one hosting plan. I think I can only have one website though so am thinking of switching plans to one that will allow multiple websites for a few more bucks per month.

I have a couple of accounts for each domain that are primarily spam catchers and have the filters set highest for those. I sort of like to review spam in the others to make sure something I want does not get deleted automatically.

Gave up on all the Facebook and other social type things. Facebook security is really poor and somehow the email I had attached to my account was found and I was buried in spam. Not worth it.
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Old 02-03-2010, 09:13 AM   #19
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Quote:
How old was the boy?
Early teens.
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Old 02-03-2010, 02:41 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post

Obviously, you still need an internet connection from somebody.
]
between you and Dave, you guys seem to understand this nebulous entity we call the internet. Maybe you can answer a question I have and have seen many others ask.

why cannot a person connect directly to the "internet" or maybe more correctly, how does one connect to the internet and how does your particular ISP do that and what do they do that a individual cannot, or maybe simply does not want, or should not do?

I would imagine that if you have a domain, you should be able to be your own ISP but I also imagine the hardware involved and maintenance of the hard and software is beyond the capabilities or desires of the average user.
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Old 02-04-2010, 02:51 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by nap View Post
between you and Dave, you guys seem to understand this nebulous entity we call the internet. Maybe you can answer a question I have and have seen many others ask.

why cannot a person connect directly to the "internet" or maybe more correctly, how does one connect to the internet and how does your particular ISP do that and what do they do that a individual cannot, or maybe simply does not want, or should not do?

I would imagine that if you have a domain, you should be able to be your own ISP but I also imagine the hardware involved and maintenance of the hard and software is beyond the capabilities or desires of the average user.
I don't really have a detailed answer to your question but I believe in the US it is the FCC that determines, through licenses, who gets to nibble directly at the internet as an ISP. I know they regulate the flow rate of things like upload speeds and so forth. They are the keepers of most all bandwith through wire or wireless with the possible exception of some military applications as I remember.
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Old 02-04-2010, 10:31 AM   #22
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Actually you can get direct Internet access
You can have a T-1 line (1m) installed
Or a fractional T-1, DSL or even bigger
This is what most business' do
The cost to a homeowner for a T-1is $199 a month, business was less (I think)

You are still "renting" a connection to the Internet
Basically this is what Comcast/Verizon etc do
They are selling you a connection, but a shared connection with your neighbors
They give volume pricing & unknown to most restrict your access/speed

In the "old" days there were many Techies who had T-1 lines run to their house & setup modem banks
They then sold access to the Internet, selling enough accounts meant you had free access yourself (T-1) & made some $$
But 1st you had to pay off the equipment
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Old 02-04-2010, 11:03 AM   #23
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but what does the T1 (go with a T3, much much better, T1's ain't squat anymore) connect to. The last T1's I hooked up were through a phone company so again, no direct connection to anything other that phone company (and their servers etc)

I guess, maybe more correctly asked:

is there a server (or, actually I understand there is no "1") or group of servers that ultimately all internet traffic passes through. Are they all private servers and receive payment from smaller server owners to route their traffic to other small servers?


for some reason, I have this horrible picture of there being 1 god server down in the depths of hell owned most likely by the government where they listen to everything that moves along the internet lines.

I know everybody says it isn't so but my paranoia says it is.

Ya see, when you get images like this as an explanation:



there is something missing there in the cloud they label as "the internet"

I guess what I am looking for is;

If I could track on bit of data from my computer to any other computer in the world, is there some server that is a common point for all data or is is more like a ring of interconnected monster servers where my data would go to whichever on Comcast is ultimately connected to and and then, within this ring of monster servers, the address determines which monster server it needs to go to and then eventually through progressively smaller branches to the recieving user computer?

if so, is the link between the monster servers an actual physical link only between those monster servers or is all of our and their data free flowing on a common link?

and, what happens if those monster server operators decide to stop being monster server operators.

what happens if they all decide to stop being monster server operators? Does the internet stop?

You guys don't really have to answer this if you don't want. It is just beyond my grasp of reality with the limited knowledge I have of the system and really doesn't make any real difference. It's like when some customer asks me how something works based on electricity, the answer often times is "magic"
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Old 02-04-2010, 05:24 PM   #24
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I am not always as careful as I could be but I never post a phone number that can be traced back to my residence online. It is worth $60/year to have a voicemail box off in some remote location for such things. I usually give a false birthday and resent being asked for it. Etc. Amazes me the amount of information people do share.

I assume that the internet is exactly two or three times as safe, secure and untappable as my cell phone (or home phone for that matter)!
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Old 02-04-2010, 05:48 PM   #25
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The "cloud" is also called the backbone of the Internet
There are major connection points & lines across the country
When one of these big ones goes down traffic slows WAY down in the affected area

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_backbone

The origial backbone was created mainly by the military
There is (was ?) a new bigger backbone going in - unsure of status

Maps of lines:
http://navigators.com/isp.html

Buying a connection is buying a connection to the Internet
Your PC is now part of the Internet
How & by who it us connected depends upon who you buy from

Forget a T-3 line direct - you are talking about thousands of dollars a month
One site listed $6-14k as a range, all depends upon what you want, actual bandwidth used, gauranteed "up" time etc

Does the Gummint monitor what is on the Internet ?
I would not even risk $1 betting that they do not

My monthly web-site hosting is $4.95 (on their server)
I doubt I could run a server for $5 electric cost a month
Internet access as part of my 3 fer FIOS is $40 a month ?

So $45 a month with up to 5m VS a T-1 at 1m & $200 a month is a no-brainer
I tested & have almost 20mb/s download & 4.5mb/s upload speeds (Boston area)
To MD only 2.5mb/s upload, Wyoming 3.2mb/s upload; 16mb/s & 4.1 to CA
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Old 02-04-2010, 08:47 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
but what does the T1 (go with a T3, much much better, T1's ain't squat anymore) connect to. The last T1's I hooked up were through a phone company so again, no direct connection to anything other that phone company (and their servers etc)

I guess, maybe more correctly asked:

is there a server (or, actually I understand there is no "1") or group of servers that ultimately all internet traffic passes through. Are they all private servers and receive payment from smaller server owners to route their traffic to other small servers?


for some reason, I have this horrible picture of there being 1 god server down in the depths of hell owned most likely by the government where they listen to everything that moves along the internet lines.

I know everybody says it isn't so but my paranoia says it is.

Ya see, when you get images like this as an explanation:



there is something missing there in the cloud they label as "the internet"

I guess what I am looking for is;

If I could track on bit of data from my computer to any other computer in the world, is there some server that is a common point for all data or is is more like a ring of interconnected monster servers where my data would go to whichever on Comcast is ultimately connected to and and then, within this ring of monster servers, the address determines which monster server it needs to go to and then eventually through progressively smaller branches to the recieving user computer?

if so, is the link between the monster servers an actual physical link only between those monster servers or is all of our and their data free flowing on a common link?

and, what happens if those monster server operators decide to stop being monster server operators.

what happens if they all decide to stop being monster server operators? Does the internet stop?

You guys don't really have to answer this if you don't want. It is just beyond my grasp of reality with the limited knowledge I have of the system and really doesn't make any real difference. It's like when some customer asks me how something works based on electricity, the answer often times is "magic"
When you ask about the 'gumint' accessing your privacy it brings to mind an experience that I had!
I was sent to manufacturers training school to train on some digital telephone equipment. T carrier interfaced to this!
Two of my fellow trainee's were members of Canada's Royal Canadian Mounted Police force!
They were being trained explicitly to be able to understand and monitor telecommunications.

You can bet your rosy red a** that this is the norm, through out the industry!
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:27 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
The origial backbone was created mainly by the military
There is (was ?) a new bigger backbone going in - unsure of status
And academia, most likely the part of it doing research for the military. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), in Champaign Urbana (HALs birthplace) is where the technology for any browser we still use was born---Mosaic was released instantly to the public domain with some researchers kicking and screaming they should have had royalties (many spun off and developed browsers based on the technology and became filthy rich anyhow). The argument is that it was developed with public funds so the public should own it. This is one of the trickiest intellectual property areas public institutions face by the way. Does the inventor of a new technology have any rights to it if employed in essence by the public?

Anyhow, NCSA was rescued from near death a few years back when it got the major contracts to develop the new internet backbone(s). They will more than likely be for military/academic use to start. They are to be faster and have provisions for getting rid of all the stalled junk that gets left on the shoulders of the current superhighway. Of course I suspect NCSA is developing all sorts of peripheral things like new browsers too.

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