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Old 01-03-2015, 01:53 PM   #1
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


Hello Everyone,

Can someone tell me what kind of compression tool and fittings the TELCOs and cable companies use for COAX, RG6 ? I've purchased two tools and two sets of fittings and the connections are not nearly as tight as what I see on the cable company wires and the factory produced cables. What do I need to do this right? Thank you

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Old 01-03-2015, 05:23 PM   #2
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


Many use "Snap N Seal". Pretty common and available on Amazon/Ebay.

I have used "Cable Pro" for many years as a professional. Also available on Amazon/Ebay.


I've used both and my preference is the CP item. But, then again, I use the tool for lots of installations, and not only for RG6.

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Old 01-03-2015, 05:30 PM   #3
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


I tried the snap-n-seal but I never was able to get a really tight fitting. It was on there, but if messed around with it enough, it would come off. I followed the instructions and believe that I used it correctly.... Is there a particular type of compression fitting that you use for coax? Thanks for the reply.
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Old 01-03-2015, 05:53 PM   #4
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


Dealing with OLD coax?

It might be you had RG6 fittings and RG59 coax. That would account for the fitting being REALLY loose. If that's the case, you just needed the correct fittings.

If it is RG6 and you have the correct fittings, when fully compressed they should be tight enough that you can't pull them off, let alone being able to move them a bit. No way, no how.
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Old 01-03-2015, 08:59 PM   #5
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


The coax is definitely old ... It's the Cable Company drop that used to go to a splitter on the outside of the house. I'm moving that splitter inside so I had to cut the head off, ran it into the house and want to put a nice fitting on there. The current fitting is not tight like you described.
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Old 01-03-2015, 10:19 PM   #6
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


You should get a tight fit even with the relatively inexpensive tools and terminations found at a typical hardware store.
I think the issue was correctly identified as using RG6 fittings on RG59 cable.
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Old 01-04-2015, 11:51 AM   #7
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


You should be able to get some of the correct fittings on Amazon, or maybe even locally at a Home Depot, or Lowe's.

Either that or try to catch one of the cable guys somewhere and get him to give you a couple fittings.
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Old 01-04-2015, 03:59 PM   #8
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


I actually just got back from Home Depot and I ended up getting a Klein Tools Compression tool that does both RG6 & RG69.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein-Too...-048/202102678

They only had RG59 RCA compression fittings, but I found some on ebay for a good price. I have a bunch of RG6 in the house that is well identified, but the cable company drop doesn't have any markings on the cladding. Is there a definitive way of determining whether a coax cable is RG59 or RG6? or is just from looking at the amount of shielding?

Thanks for all of the information. Appreciate it.
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Old 01-04-2015, 04:43 PM   #9
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COAX Compression Tool Recommendation ?


RG59 fittings will just not go on RG6 no matter how hard you try, so that's a pretty simple way to figure out what you're dealing with.


The old black RG59 probably wouldn't have any markings on it, so the way to tell what you're dealing with is to test fit with the actual fittings.


Yeah, I could tell the difference, at a glance, having worked with both for many years, but most people would just be guessing (including some of the guys I hired over the years)..

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