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Old 09-12-2009, 05:43 PM   #1
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Cable question


Hi,

I just installed a new cable signal booster; and it is powered by a 12 volt adapter that hooks to rg cable. So I need to run a new cable to the nearest power source (about 35 feet.) It should be no problem since the booster says it can be up to 200 feet away.

A while back I had taken what I thought was 500 feet of standard "cable tv" cable from a free item ad on craiglist. I never looked at it closely until today.

The cable has 2 braided wires running thru it instead of one solid wire. It also looks a little thicker than standard RG cable.

What is this cable? Can I use this cable for powering my new cable tv signal booster? I'm guessing not. How would I terminate it? I know how to terminate standard tv cable, but not this...

What is this cable meant for? I've also been thinking about putting a large roof antennae up. Is this 2 wire cable made for antennae? How would someone wire it for this purpose? I've got so much of it, I'd like to put it to use.

And while I'm asking, can anyone recommend a good value on a home roof antannae for HDTV. I am out in the country and want one that picks up distant channels. I don't care how big or ugly it is; but I don't want to spend too much. And would this antennae work with my 2 wire cable?

Thanks!
s
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Old 09-12-2009, 06:25 PM   #2
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HDTV and all TV signals require a digital signal now. So a roof antennae is no longer an option.

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Old 09-12-2009, 07:28 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
HDTV and all TV signals require a digital signal now. So a roof antennae is no longer an option.
You mean there is no such thing as a digital roof antennae? I have a digital antennae now, but out where I live I don't get good reception. My neighbor has an antennae on his roof that gets HD. I am just asking if anyone knows a good affordable digital antennae that will work up on my roof.

BTW I took a sample of that cable to my local Home store and none of the employees in the electrical dept knew what it was for. I bought some standard cable for my cable tv booster. I'd still be curious what that cable is good for if anyone knows.

Thanks,
s
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Old 09-12-2009, 09:18 PM   #4
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I've never seen a cable like that
There are still roof antennaes & you can pick up a signal, still an option
It all depends upon station(s) near you if you will be able to get any signal
I haven't used a roof antennae in a few years
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Old 09-13-2009, 04:31 PM   #5
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By researching on the net, I found it it's called twinax.

I'm still not sure what to use if for. Maybe I'll sell it on ebay...
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Old 09-13-2009, 07:50 PM   #6
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Radio.
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Old 09-13-2009, 08:42 PM   #7
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Did you cut that with a steak knife?????



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Old 09-25-2009, 11:26 AM   #8
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Twinax is a signal wire...used in many applications...usually transmitters. maybe something 2-way.
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:35 AM   #9
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Quote:
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HDTV and all TV signals require a digital signal now. So a roof antennae is no longer an option.
Can you explain this a little more?
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Old 09-25-2009, 03:50 PM   #10
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system is soon to switch to all digital signals. From what I am told, antennae only capture analog signals.
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Old 09-25-2009, 07:29 PM   #11
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Quote:
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system is soon to switch to all digital signals. From what I am told, antennae only capture analog signals.
http://www.engadgethd.com/2006/01/30...d-demystified/
http://antennaweb.org/aw/welcome.aspx
Some good reading for you.
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Old 09-25-2009, 08:07 PM   #12
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Over the air viewing is still available

http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/digitaltv.html

They aren't about to shut off TV to millions of people who do not have cable etc

Quote:
How Do I Receive Digital Broadcasts If I Don’t Subscribe To Cable Or Satellite?
If you receive only free over-the-air television programming, the type of TV you own, either a digital TV or an analog TV, is very important. Consumers who receive only free over-the-air television may view digital programming through a TV set with a built-in digital tuner (integrated DTV) or a digital-ready monitor with a separate digital tuner set-top box. (Both of these digital television types are referred to as a DTV). The only additional equipment required to view over-the-air digital programming with a DTV is a regular antenna, either on your roof or a smaller version on your TV such as “rabbit ears.”
If you have an analog television, you will have to purchase a digital-to-analog set-top converter box to attach to your TV set to be able to view over-the-air digital programming (see “What About My Analog TV?” below).
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Old 09-25-2009, 09:45 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
system is soon to switch to all digital signals. From what I am told, antennae only capture analog signals.
I want to meet the person that told you that.
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Old 09-25-2009, 09:54 PM   #14
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You can also build an HDTV antenna:
Low cost

http://uhfhdtvantenna.blogspot.com/
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Old 09-26-2009, 07:16 AM   #15
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must have read it from one of those lower level sites. I stand corrected, and I appreciate the corrections.

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