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-   -   Questions about rewiring ethernet cabling in my house (http://www.diychatroom.com/f11/questions-about-rewiring-ethernet-cabling-my-house-34750/)

faromic80 12-30-2008 11:23 PM

Questions about rewiring ethernet cabling in my house
 
I have a question regarding ethernet cable wiring. When I built my house about 3 years ago, I wired three
of my four bedrooms upstairs for ethernet cables. I had planned at the time to have my office downstairs
in the room next to the family room, so I installed a wall plate with the three ethernet jacks linked to
the three upstairs bedrooms. The router and cable modem were downstairs in the office and everything
worked nicely with the 3 cables from the router connected to the 3 jacks in the wall. Then my wife had a
baby and decided to make my office a playroom/toyroom. I moved the office upstairs into the smallest bedroom
(which is the room without the internet jack). I had to move the cable jack from one side of the room to the
other side. I did this from the attic by splicing into the existing line going to the other side of the room.
I also ran an ethernet cable through the wall to the attic planning to somehow get the three jacks in the other
3 rooms working. I can't just splice them all together since this would just like all three cables together and not allow for networking. Could I run three new cables from my new office upstairs through the wall and splice each one of these cables to a cable in the attic. Then the connection would work in the rooms as intended. Any other thoughts on how to rectify this?

sawyerEd 12-30-2008 11:53 PM

Wired LANS vs. Wireless
 
Your situation is why we have wireless. Plans change and you have to regroup a wired LAN. Too hard. Is there some reason you don't want wireless.

faromic80 12-31-2008 10:51 AM

I just like a hard wired connection better if possible of course. Sometimes the wireless signal cuts out. Wireless is good if you are just surfing the net, but if you're doing something like gaming (I'm not a huge gamer) or work related which need a dependable connection, I don't trust wireless entirely. If I can't, I'll just go with the wireless. I just preferred a wired connection.

sawyerEd 12-31-2008 02:13 PM

RF and Health effects
 
I can understand why you might not want a wireless transmitter in the baby's room. I haven't been able to find a definitive answer on the health effects of wireless network devises. There seems to be quite a bit of research on the effects of cell phone transceivers that are held near brain tissue for extended periods of time. Lots of things around the home generate RF and can interfer or block data transmission. But wired LANs have their problems too.
As far as I know you cannot simply splice cat5e branch circuits together without a hub, router, or switch as an interface. You can extend a run perhaps 300 ft or more. I usually crimp male female connectors on for this purpose. I don't think the loss across the platinum contacts is significant. Your situation is getting complicated enough where you may need a better switch. We have used 3Com switches where we have a number of network devices to connect. The switch is intelligent and knows what kind of device is on any of its ports and routes the data accordingly. You need crossover cat5 wiring to connect switches to hubs or switches to internet adapters. Most other network devices can use straight through cat5 wiring.
Clear as mud? Good luck.

Rasputin 01-01-2009 10:30 PM

Filtering out what I need here:
Quote:

Originally Posted by faromic80 (Post 204657)
When I built my house about 3 years ago, I wired three of my four bedrooms upstairs for ethernet cables. I had planned at the time to have my office downstairs in the room next to the family room, so I installed a wall plate with the three ethernet jacks linked to the three upstairs bedrooms. The router and cable modem were downstairs in the office and everything worked

...

I moved the office upstairs into the smallest bedroom. I also ran an ethernet cable through the wall to the attic planning to somehow get the three jacks in the other 3 rooms working.

Could I run three new cables from my new office upstairs through the wall and splice each one of these cables to a cable in the attic. Then the connection would work in the rooms as intended. Any other thoughts on how to rectify this?

Ed's very correct. You cannot splice networking cable at all. If I'm sketching this out right in my head, you now have a situation where you have an Ethernet cable running up and over into the attic nearby the other 3 jacks.

Unfortunately, you'll have to re-run all of the cable.

Were I to clean up this situation, I'd likely just designate the 'new office' the "Office in perpetuity" and turn the closet in that room into the network closet. I would run all of the Ethernet back to that closet, terminate it and plug it into a router or a switch. I'd also move the cable jack one more time into the closet so as to have everything terminating in the same place, and patch that into the router or switch as well.

I'd normally prefer to do this close to the "home run" entry location in the house but you play the hand you're dealt.

Theoretically you could just leave the equipment in the original office space and run a single, new jack to the new office as well. That may be easiest.

Reply if you have other questions, I'll try to help you out.

Git 01-02-2009 03:04 PM

It sounds like the hard part is going to be getting the new cable down from the attic into your 3 bedrooms....

You can't "splice" your 3 cables in the attic, but you can "terminate" them.

There are a couple of ways to do it:


You can buy individual connectors like these, Leviton Quickports, sold at Home Depot or online. Very easy to use, and no special tools required.

http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibcGe...10027:22372:US

This will give you a properly terminated female connection. You can then run your 3 new lines up into the attic. I would then use a EZRJ45 connector like this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...500_AA275_.jpg

These are actually pretty easy to use, because unlike normal rj45 connectors, there are holes in the end so the wires can protrude through, insuring you have the wires in the right order. Then you can simply plug the rj45s into your Quickports and you should be done. (You will need a crimping tool for the RJ45)

A better option, but more expensive, would be a small 'punch down' board like this, or even a small panel that would include the board

http://us.st12.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.c..._2031_29785853

Cost would be around $40 for the board. Cut your 3 old lines in the attic, and connect them to the board - even easier then the quickport. Run your 3 new lines to the attic, connect them to the board. Buy 3 pre-configured patch cables, plug them into the jacks and your done.

I would avoid placing any electronics, like the modem or router in the attic due to the temperatures - especiall the high heat of summer

brandonriffel 06-15-2010 10:49 PM

I agree, you need to rerun these lines. Stick to wired connections whenever possible. I would find a location in the basement, or at the top of a closet and put a small shelf in or a 2x2 piece of plywood. Then terminate all of your connections there and put in a network switch. You can still put your cable or DSL modem in another room (provided it has a network connection in it). Then uplink the switch from there. If you put the cable/dsl modem in the closet or basement, you'll kick yourself every time you have to power cycle the unit to fix and issue.

Your other option is this: put a small cabinet in the play room either above the reach of your kids, or put a small lock on it. Then just leave all your network stuff down there. Easy peazy.

Brandon in Kansas

pyper 01-27-2012 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brandonriffel (Post 456893)
I agree, you need to rerun these lines.

Since this thread is originally from 2008, I'm sure the OP has done whatever he was going to do and moved on :thumbsup:

I think I probably would have left the modem and the router in the nursery and pulled a new wire to the new office.

I just ran ethernet wires in our new house because I'm not a big fan of wireless. I do have wireless for the smartphones, but all the PCs & the TV are wired.

I have one tip:

ALWAYS pull two wires instead of one. It's no harder to pull two, and you might either need another device or have a wire go bad.

Rasputin 01-27-2012 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pyper (Post 836096)
ALWAYS pull two wires instead of one. It's no harder to pull two, and you might either need another device or have a wire go bad.

Agreed. Actually around here it's pull 4. :)


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