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-   -   Cant remove tractor blade bolt (http://www.diychatroom.com/f106/cant-remove-tractor-blade-bolt-186417/)

oz1907 09-03-2013 01:29 PM

Cant remove tractor blade bolt
 
Just bought a house, it came with a husqvarna tractor.. I bought a mulching kit.. i am trying to remove the blades to put the mulching blades on.. I just can't get the bolt off.. I soaked it in pb blaster, wd40 no luck.. I used a pipe with the wrench like a breaking bar, it broke the socket (!) but the bolt won't budge.. Any ideas???

SeniorSitizen 09-03-2013 02:30 PM

A USA made S-K socket. Counter clock as viewed from the bottom.

oz1907 09-03-2013 02:47 PM

Got your msg at lowes shopping for a new socket.. picked up a USA made set.. a little more pb blaster and the pipe.. DONE.. worked like a charm .. never again going cheap on tools like these.. first time home/tools owner ;) lot to learn thanks for the advice

wkearney99 09-03-2013 02:49 PM

WD40 is an absolute waste of time for this sort of thing. PB Blaster or Kroil (among others) are the correct kind of stuff to use.

When using penetrating oils it really helps if you can allow the oil to pool up on the threads. That helps it soak down into the corroded gaps in between the metals.

Do you have a way to up-end the assembly so as to be able to pour the oil into the threads? Or a way to fashion a reservoir to keep it soaked? That would help. Also note it helps to come back and give the assembly a firm, sharp smack with a hammer. This helps break the corrosion some to allow the oil more room to penetrate. I've had some stuff (like disc brakes frozen onto axles) take upwards of a week's worth of soaking and tapping until they finally came loose.

Is it a nut or a bolt holding it on? If it's a nut then you might have to cut it off. A dremel and a bunch of cut off wheels is typically one way to do it. But if it's a bolt and it's frozen into the shaft then your only hope might be to persuade it to come loose by applying a torch to it.

One additional thought, find the parts diagram for that make/model of equipment and see how it's put together. If it's not an expensive part, and can be removed without wrecking anything else, then it might be better to just buy a new one.

Just remember when you do get it apart to make use of some anti-seize compound on the threads before you put it back together again. Just a tiny bit, nor more that what the instructions indicate.

No doubt had the previous owners made a habit of removing the blades and sharpening them this probably wouldn't have happened...

oz1907 09-03-2013 02:57 PM

Thanks Bill good stuff! Will keep in mind! This time it was either the cheap socket that failed on me or the pb blaster I put on again before heading to lowes did the trick

wkearney99 09-03-2013 03:05 PM

Well, dang, that's a fast fix then! Good to hear you met with success!

jagans 09-08-2013 08:46 PM

1. Never buy cheap tools, its a good way to get hurt. China makes pretty good sneakers.

2. Not sure why another poster said to use a tiny bit of Anti- Seize. Coat the threads good with it.

3. Make sure your blades are sharpened and balanced, less wear on tower bearings.

4. Buy a grease gun, and green waterproof grease. Clean grease fittings inject grease into towers till it just oozes out top, and or pushes out all old waterborne grease.

5. At the end of the season Pressure wash the bottom of the deck, wire wheel and paint it with a good enamel. The decks are the first thing to go on lawn tractors. Mine is a 96 Simplicity and still going strong because i do this to the deck yearly.

Buy yourself a decent air compressor. One with a belt drive and a flywheel, and at least 3.5 HP motor. You will use it for everything. You would have gotten that bolt out in a New York Minute with a 1/2 inch pneumatic impact gun and socket.

Good luck with your new home!

vsheetz 09-08-2013 08:58 PM

Spray with PB Blaster, let it sit a day, then try to loosen. If still unsuccessful, repeat as needed.

wkearney99 09-09-2013 08:24 AM

It is *wrong* to use more than the necessary amount of anti-seize on threads. To do so can put added pressure on the threads and runs the risk of compromising the connection. This would be an EXTREMELY BAD IDEA on something with A SPINNING BLADE ATTACHED. You wouldn't think it could matter, but it can.

Being careless about it out of ignorance is ridiculously stupid for something like a spinning mower blade.

jagans 09-09-2013 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wkearney99 (Post 1239721)
It is *wrong* to use more than the necessary amount of anti-seize on threads. To do so can put added pressure on the threads and runs the risk of compromising the connection. This would be an EXTREMELY BAD IDEA on something with A SPINNING BLADE ATTACHED. You wouldn't think it could matter, but it can.

Being careless about it out of ignorance is ridiculously stupid for something like a spinning mower blade.

Thanks Bill, Interesting. I guess Ill have to stop putting it on my toast in the morning. :laughing:

Just for the heck of it, exactly how does anti-seize compound put pressure on the threads? Im always looking to learn something new, and you generally have very good advice.

wkearney99 09-09-2013 11:44 AM

Threads are cut to minimize gaps. Putting anything in-between those gaps puts pressure on the metal. Tightening further compresses it. This puts a material in-between what were otherwise closely machined surfaces, adding to the stress on the metal. Metal fatigue should not be ignored when dealing with spinning mass and sharp edges. The point being use as thin a skin of it as possible, not glop it on and expect the nut to clear it away sufficiently.


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