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-   -   Briggs And Stratton Replacement Options (http://www.diychatroom.com/f106/briggs-stratton-replacement-options-139517/)

timsmead 04-07-2012 10:13 AM

Briggs And Stratton Replacement Options
 
I have a Briggs and Stratton 18 hp vanguard engine Model 350777 that is blown in my John Deere GT235 Mower. I need to replace the motor. What options do I have? Or can I only put the same motor back in

user1007 04-07-2012 10:52 AM

Have you checked to see what John Deere recommends and why not another B&S? Unfortunately, small engines of any kind really take a beating thanks to Ethanol---one of the biggest rip offs in US History (starting with that we could buy it cheaper and then subsidize US farmers to grow food crops we could eat without processing instead). And you cannot buy fuel, even for small engines without it in it.

joecaption 04-07-2012 11:10 AM

I just did a key word search on that motor and hundreds of sites came up selling them both new and used.
It's better to buy that exact same model so you know the bolt patterns for mounting and the shaft size and length are right.

http://www.smallenginesurplus.com/br...es-p-3331.html

You say the motor blew up, just how bad is it really.

Non ethenal fuel has nothing to do with an engine blowing up. It however make a mess of the fuel lines and the carberator.
There's thousands of places selling non ethenal fuel. I live in a very rural area and there's at least 4 places with 15 miles of my house selling it. Just ask at any place that sells power equipment or boats and they will know where to get it.
It's not cheap but it's worth the extra money.

DrHicks 04-07-2012 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by timsmead (Post 893637)
I have a Briggs and Stratton 18 hp vanguard engine Model 350777 that is blown in my John Deere GT235 Mower. I need to replace the motor. What options do I have? Or can I only put the same motor back in

Most of the time, it's a complete waste of money to try to rebuild lawn mower engines. Just replace it with a new or used engine (it's not likely that you'll find a used one that's worth buying).

Do what JoeCaption suggested, and do a Google search for that model number. Also check eBay. But before you order anything, make sure the specs are all the same.

Most likely, you're going to drop $800 - $1000 on a new engine. I assume you can do the work of replacing it yourself.

In my opinion, a GT235 is well worth fixing, unless everything else on it is junked out.

DrHicks 04-07-2012 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 893668)
Have you checked to see what John Deere recommends and why not another B&S? Unfortunately, small engines of any kind really take a beating thanks to Ethanol---one of the biggest rip offs in US History (starting with that we could buy it cheaper and then subsidize US farmers to grow food crops we could eat without processing instead). And you cannot buy fuel, even for small engines without it in it.

Ethanol doesn't blow up small engines. Lubrication problems and/or wear blow up small engines.

user1007 04-07-2012 12:07 PM

Ethanol above an e10 mix, e15 for example, not only destroys or clogs plastic, rubber and gasket material parts in small engines but corrodes metal and raises exhaust temperatures substantially. Its chemical structure alters the lubrication properties of oil making it particularly disastrous in 2-cycle engines like on trimmers, edgers, chainsaws, etc. It cause fuel to ignite at the wrong time.

Come on guys, how can these factors possibly not contribute in blowing a small engine and that the stuff only corrodes fuel lines or something.

The stuff is a disaster for small engines. Joe's idea of driving out to a rural area or to a boat yard is not bad at all. The boating industry is one of the strongest voices against the stuff.

You can buy small cans of real gas and additives.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home...nd-tear-of-e10

I most certainly would never buy a used small engine. A friend in Iowa makes a living farming acres and acres of non-edible corn and buying and rebuilding lawn tractor things. A cousin still farms, with no subsidies, sweet corn and other food crops in Minnesota but will soon be a goner.

PM if you need parts other than an engine.

DrHicks 04-07-2012 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 893714)
Ethanol above an e10 mix, e15 for example, not only destroys or clogs plastic, rubber and gasket material parts in small engines but corrodes metal and raises exhaust temperatures substantially. Its chemical structure alters the lubrication properties of oil making it particularly disastrous in 2-cycle engines like on trimmers, edgers, chainsaws, etc. It cause fuel to ignite at the wrong time.

Come on guys, how can these factors possibly not contribute in blowing a small engine and that the stuff only corrodes fuel lines or something.

The stuff is a disaster for small engines. Joe's idea of driving out to a rural area or to a boat yard is not bad at all. The boating industry is one of the strongest voices against the stuff.

E85, yes. E10, no.

I ran a bunch of small engines - mowers, trimmers, blowers, etc. - when my boys & I did a lawn-care service. We were in Minnesota, where E10 is mandated and you cannot get anything else unless it's racing fuel. We NEVER had a fuel-related problem with ANY of our equipment. Ever.

Yes, we had rubber fuel lines get old & crack, but that eventually happens with all rubber fuel lines - and always has.



As you know, the key to longevity in small engines is good lubrication, and keeping them clean so that they run cooler.

Bud Cline 04-30-2012 07:13 PM

Looking for suggestions
 
I have an eighteen year old MTD with an 18 horse twin Briggs.

Ran fine last year, this year is a different story.

This year...
New fuel, fuel conditioner, fuel filter.
New oil and oil filter.
New plugs.
Fresh carb/jets cleaning.

The engine starts and runs fine for about two minutes and then stalls-out on its own. A stall cannot be recovered with the choke. Doesn't matter if the engine is loaded with motion and blades. It will immediately re-start but then in a couple of minutes stall again.

Any ideas?

DexterII 04-30-2012 07:53 PM

Hey Bud, good to see you. At first pass, I would suspect a dirty, damaged, or incorrect fuel tank cap. Just like your finger over a straw, a plugged cap will create a vacuum, causing the engine to run out of gas; then, let it set, air finds it's way in, and it restarts. Try running it with the cap loose, and if that helps, clean or replace it. If that doesn't work, I would susupect a bad fuel line. Next would be a thorough carb cleaning, after which I would move to a condenser or coil. The latter two though often take more than just a couple of minutes to cause a problem, so before going there, you may want to pull the or a spark plug when it stops, to see if you have fire, or not. Again though, first pass, it sounds to me like a fuel problem.

DrHicks 04-30-2012 08:26 PM

It just about has to be a fuel problem, Bud. It's entirely possible to have something electronic get hot & fail, but it would not start back up immediately.

I suspect what Dexter said about a fuel tank cap. But I'd also put money on some little piece of junk floating around in the bowl of your carb, and eventually getting sucked up against your main jet. Engine dies, no vacuum, and it falls back to the bottom of the bowl. Those jets are tiny, and it doesn't take much to plug them.

It's also possible - but less likely - that the carb bowl didn't get put on quite right, float is getting hung up, and the needle valve is not letting gas in the bowl. What makes me kind of doubt that scenario is that there's no reason the float would drop after the engine dies.

Bud Cline 04-30-2012 09:20 PM

Thanks guys.
Fuel starvation is what it acts like but haven't really searched that out as yet. Been doing other things. The carb has been dis-assembled and cleaned and it was as clean as it could be to begin with.

I suspected an electrical issue at first but can't prove that as yet.

Thanks for the ideas.

DrHicks 04-30-2012 09:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bud Cline (Post 911355)
Thanks guys.
Fuel starvation is what it acts like but haven't really searched that out as yet. Been doing other things. The carb has been dis-assembled and cleaned and it was clean as to be to begin with.

I suspected an electrical issue at first but can't prove that as yet.

Thanks for the ideas.

The immediate restart is what has me thinking it's not electrical.

Bud Cline 04-30-2012 09:52 PM

The fuel tank has a fuel gauge-type-cap. Meaning...the cap has a dial built on to it and then there is a float that rides a couple of small rails into the tank. The float turns the dial as it moves up and down the rails depending on the fuel level. It's funky for sure. If you remove the cap and hold it up to daylight you can see through the cap at the needle/dial so I assume the tank is getting air through that hole but I could be wrong. Next time we try to start it I'll remove the gas cap totally and see if that changes anything. Wasn't an issue last year.:whistling2: But, last year the fuel gauge didn't work and this year it does (half-asssed) because my son "fixed" it.

DrHicks 04-30-2012 11:11 PM

^ I've got one of those wonderful cap/gauges on an old '69 John Deere 112 that I only use with the tiller. The "clear" plastic is so yellowed and dirty that I have no idea whether it works or not.


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