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-   -   WaterProofing onolith foundation basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/waterproofing-onolith-foundation-basement-183998/)

Stcrosby 07-21-2013 05:38 PM

WaterProofing onolith foundation basement
 
Situation: Im finishing my basement in my 1956 cape in NJ. The basement has gotten seepage where the floor meets the concrete block. Not a lot, moisture is only visable after major storms but as far as I am concerned any amount of water will lead to mold.
We have a low water table, therefore the seepage is from rain or ground run off water.
I attempted to have an interior French drain installed; however they discovered I have a monolithic footing and the poured concrete is approx. 3’ deep within 2-3' off the concrete block.
When looking at the floor the concrete block sits a few inches into the slab.
All gutters are cleaned. Grade is pitched away from the house.

Basement will be finished with foam board insullation, metal studs, drywall and engineered wood flooring with underlayment.

Are there alternative options for a interior French drain OTHER then an exterior drainage system? Or any other ideas to solve this water issue??

Thank you in advance

joecaption 07-21-2013 06:45 PM

Can you post some pictures of the outside of the house?

Stcrosby 07-21-2013 07:45 PM

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MTN REMODEL LLC 07-21-2013 08:15 PM

Crosby... I'm actually not sure what a mono-lith foundation is,,, obviously not a mono-pour from your description... so you may get better suggestions, more knowledgeable from others.

However, in a sub basement (75%) below grade in my own personal home, on a stemwall/slab assembly, I had minor leakage under heavy snow melt conditions. With 6 ft under ground, even with decent slope outside... not too surprizing.

I was able to completely resolve it with:

1) Packing hydraulic cement at my stem to slab cold joint (maybe a 1" concave caulk-like joint) and

2) UG Water block on the walls... I used the oil base, and applied it well, making sure it penetrated all pores

You might try it... but test it before covering it up...

Obviously, shedding water, giving it a path of less resistance, is better than trying to block it... but sometimes the only option is a combination

Best

Peter

Stcrosby 07-21-2013 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MTN REMODEL LLC (Post 1219136)
Crosby... I'm actually not sure what a mono-lith foundation is,,, obviously not a mono-pour from your description... so you may get better suggestions, more knowledgeable from others.

Sorry, I used the wrong terminology. I have a mono pour footing.

However, in a sub basement (75%) below grade in my own personal home, on a stemwall/slab assembly, I had minor leakage under heavy snow melt conditions. With 6 ft under ground, even with decent slope outside... not too surprizing.

I was able to completely resolve it with:

1) Packing hydraulic cement at my stem to slab cold joint (maybe a 1" concave caulk-like joint) and

I was thinking about something like this but there is no visible joint gap, does that matter??

2) UG Water block on the walls... I used the oil base, and applied it well, making sure it penetrated all pores

I feel this may work temporarily but Id rather fix the problem at the source. But thanks for the advice.

You might try it... but test it before covering it up...

Obviously, shedding water, giving it a path of less resistance, is better than trying to block it... but sometimes the only option is a combination

Best

Peter

Again thanks for your experience

ccarlisle 07-22-2013 08:07 AM

You might want to reconsider metal studs down there; look into blue wood...

MTN REMODEL LLC 07-22-2013 08:13 AM

I feel this may work temporarily but Id rather fix the problem at the source. But thanks for the advice.

You might try it... but test it before covering it up...

Obviously, shedding water, giving it a path of less resistance, is better than trying to block it... but sometimes the only option is a combination



Crosby..... Could not agree with you more:thumbsup:

Stcrosby 07-22-2013 11:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccarlisle (Post 1219352)
You might want to reconsider metal studs down there; look into blue wood...

Please explain. My thoughts are that even pt wood will eventually become a food source for mold. Metal may corrode over time but these studs are not structural therefore id rather the lesser of two evils.
I'd like to hear what other think??
Thanks,

ccarlisle 07-22-2013 12:54 PM

Blue boards (for studding) repels moulds - that's why they make them, specifically for basements...

I should be more specific: 'Bluwood' is the trade name up here, so I imagine it's the same in the US. But maybe not...

Stcrosby 07-22-2013 02:40 PM

You are correct, we do not see a lot of them down here but I am familiar with them. I'm still curious why you prefer bluwood over metal??

stadry 07-23-2013 08:09 PM

ooops - didn't see this thread so responded to the top posting,,, we used it often when we had our biz in nj,,, IF the lower block courses are grout-filled, you need to move the drainage holes up where you can drain the water,,, add fiber-reinforced f/g panels* & finish it off

monopour - unipour - turned-down edge --- they're all the same,,, good luck !

* - rest room walls in gsp & njtpke

Stcrosby 07-23-2013 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsreallyconc (Post 1220095)
IF the lower block courses are grout-filled, you need to move the drainage holes up where you can drain the water,,, add fiber-reinforced f/g panels* & finish it off

Please explain?? I understand about drilling where the water is but the panels???

Thanks

stadry 07-23-2013 11:05 PM

all these cove systems have to stand off the wall a bit so any leaking water can run down the wall, behind the cove system, & drain away,,, IF your drain holes are 2 courses above the floor, would you have them exposed or covered ?,,, hence the f/g panels,,, 1 can always sheetrock above the panels at 4' or whatever elevation you choose

is mid-atlantic still in biz ? we started subbing from them as an installation crew then started our own,,, call them for REALLY CREATIVE PRICING :-)

Stcrosby 07-26-2013 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsreallyconc (Post 1220161)


is mid-atlantic still in biz ? we started subbing from them as an installation crew then started our own,,, call them for REALLY CREATIVE PRICING :-)

Yes I believe they are but they get very poor reviews from the BBB and customer reviews.

stadry 07-26-2013 10:21 PM

so what's new ? they did 20yrs ago but they're still truckin' :yes:


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