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Old 10-06-2012, 07:45 AM   #1
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Watering new concrete


Should I water 5 day old concrete during the day when the high will be 50 and the low will drop to 31 in the evening. I am afraid of the surface freezing from any residual water. From what I read on the internet, the compressive strength has reached about 60 percent. I watered it for the first 4 days when the nightly low was above 41. Should I resume watering it when this cold front has passes and the highs get back into the 60s and the lows in the 40s? Thanks for your advice.
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Old 10-06-2012, 08:52 AM   #2
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Watering new concrete


Usually concrete is covered with some variant of curing compound, burlap, plastic, or sometimes even straw. The forms are normally left in place at least three days, but ideally would be left in place for 30 days or so. The purpose of covering the concrete is to prevent evaporation of moisture from the surface, which promotes proper curing. In some cases, it is impractical to cover the concrete, and the the surface needs to be kept moist using misters or similar techniques. Watering the surface is OK, but not ideal, since you may introduce too much water, and you have to watch the concrete very carefully to make sure it stays moist.

Ideally you should keep the concrete covered for thirty days, On most commercial jobs the covering is curing compound, which remains in place indefinitely. If you did not use curing compound, you may want to cover the concrete, or you can continue misting it. A light cover of water will not freeze on the surface even in below freezing weather, due to the residual heat of the concrete, and chemical effects.
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Old 10-07-2012, 06:12 AM   #3
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Watering new concrete


Thank you for your wisdom. I have also noticed a few pin holes on the horizontal surface. I don't want these to turn into pits, is there anything I should do about these right now? I am planning on applying a penetrating sealer after 28 days (90 percent compressive strength), will the sealer take care of these tiny holes?
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:05 PM   #4
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Watering new concrete


No, a good penetrating sealer won't fill any kind of void, but it certainly is a good idea for concrete poured this late in the year in a freeze-thaw climate. You may want to "smear" a little cement paste or similar into the voids before sealing.......
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:59 PM   #5
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Watering new concrete


Delete wrong post
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Old 10-13-2012, 10:15 AM   #6
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Watering new concrete


I was talking with a concrete guy about a job i'm going to do and asked the same question and he said that covering concrete is old technology and the new conretes don't need it. thoughts? i'm in southern cal where it can get pretty warm, not sure if that affects his recommendation.
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Old 10-13-2012, 12:20 PM   #7
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Watering new concrete


Quote:
Originally Posted by jfryjfry View Post
I was talking with a concrete guy about a job i'm going to do and asked the same question and he said that covering concrete is old technology and the new conretes don't need it. thoughts? i'm in southern cal where it can get pretty warm, not sure if that affects his recommendation.
There are three methods for curing concrete. Water can be added to the surface of the concrete (misting), the concrete can be sealed to prevent the already existing water from evaporating or both methods can be combined.
  • To mist, cover the concrete with a fine mist or sprinkling of water at least twice a day for three to five days. Misting is the best method for curing concrete that has been poured indoors, but caution should be used if the concrete has been given a textured or decorative finish. Use a fine mist in light layers that will not affect the decorative finish.
    For concrete that is poured outside, sealing may be the best method of curing. Moisten the concrete and cover it with building paper, burlap or roofing felt to keep the moisture in. Keep the concrete sealed for three to five days.
    Concrete that is exposed to direct sunlight or hot weather should be cured by combining both misting and sealing. Uncover and mist the concrete twice a day for three to five days.
    In addition, there are curing additives and admixtures, such as a product called Barrier-1, that can be mixed into the wet concrete, allowing it to cure as it dries without additional steps. However, some of these additives are cost prohibitive for the average home renovator and are more practical for contractors who do large-scale or frequent concrete work and this is probably what he is talking about.

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Old 10-13-2012, 07:03 PM   #8
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Watering new concrete


Applying a curing agent, oftentimes a "curing sealer", is the easiest approach that most contractors will take. It should be sprayed on as soon as possible, and the intent is to keep the moisture trapped in the concrete as long as possible.

Watering a slab takes a lot of time, as it HAS to stay wet the entire time it's curing, or you're merely wasting your time. Allowing the slab to dry and hitting it with a dose of cold water can actually have more negative effects than postive............
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Old 10-13-2012, 10:16 PM   #9
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Watering new concrete


You need the waxy white liquid from the buckets with green lettering, and a red metal sprayer (Chapman?)

On interior pours, I cover with plastic. If you don't need to work there, just leave it covered for 30 days as recommended.
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