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Old 02-29-2012, 11:55 AM   #16
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wall to wall basement pour questions


I'm sure the pros have no trouble working to a chalk line. And the additional chalk line above grade is a good idea. But for an amateur, in the hectic confusion of making the pour, it might be worth all the extra work to establish a screed surface that can be pulled out of the way for finishing. For one such concept see below.


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Old 02-29-2012, 10:27 PM   #17
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wall to wall basement pour questions


Theoretically, that is a fine idea. I'm sure it will work well. The problem is the cost. If it doesn't matter to you, go ahead and do it.

I think most everyone is using the rod system, where they put some rods on "Y" supports, screed, then pull the rods and the "Y" supports, or drive them down.

I've never used that system because I thought you would need a lot of "Y" supports, and it would be a pain to fill in after the parts have been pulled.

I guess you could just screw on a piece of angle to the wall, screed off it, and remove later.

As far as that goes, you could put a piece of lumber on the wall, put a stick on top of screed board, and go with that.

I just like to have something positive, rather than a chalk line. The chalk line will work fine, until you go laying 18x18 tile on the floor.
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Old 02-29-2012, 11:01 PM   #18
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wall to wall basement pour questions


cleveman -

You are right about a DIYer not having the skill to be accurate enough on a 16x24 addition. Usually, a slab that size is big enough to use ready-mix and have one skilled person on hand that is capable of hitting the chalk line while the others are doing the grunt work. The same thing applies whether the wall is poured or block. One good finisher will not drink any more beer when done than a buddy that does the grunt work. I have seen the same problem for over 35 years.

Sticking a piece of wood between the slab and walls defeats all of the advantages of providing positive lateral support to a wall in the long term in case of floods or poor drainage. If you have any reasonable code, it also defies the code in most areas, plus the wood will eventually be gone and create problems as it deteriorates even if it is PT. - That is almost as bad as the little drainage trench common on some cheap older basements in the east.

The OP has a block wall, so it should be laid in a full mortar bed (first course) and have a minimal amount of vertical reinforcement to satisfy the shear problems on the first couple of courses and to increase the wall structural flexural strength to match or exceed a minimal poured wall of the same thickness. - You may not realize it, but a reinforced block wall can be stronger than reinforced poured wall if someone wants it to be since block can be 8500 psi.

The important thing is the detail of attaching a temporary 1x4 to the wall since the footing may not be as level as you would like it to make it truely level. A chalk line and level gives an accurate positive elevation to work to. One high spot or a few pieces of high aggregate totally defeats the concept of a 1x4 on a footing unless it is just for storage.

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Old 02-29-2012, 11:14 PM   #19
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wall to wall basement pour questions


That's a good point about the boards on the footing. I nail them on with concrete nails when the walls are still green.

I had one basement I laid a bunch of tile in and it was fine.

I guess the same argument could be made about setting form on the center footing.

What about if I use some cement board as a form on the perimeter. Can I get a pass for that?
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Old 03-02-2012, 09:21 AM   #20
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wall to wall basement pour questions


pls8xx - your idea is interesting. I had seen similar things mentioned other places on the web. Had thought about attaching a board to the wall with the bottom of the board level with what will be the top of the floor, then use a screed board that is notched on the end to allow it to ride on the guide board.



I figure it's probably a good idea to help things move quicker once the concrete is poured.

Another question - how long do I let a floor like this cure before moving things into the room?
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:04 AM   #21
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wall to wall basement pour questions


Just use Agilia, self leveling concrete. Google it.
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:33 AM   #22
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wall to wall basement pour questions


No!!!! - Not for a basement slab!!!

Don't over-think a simple project.

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Old 03-30-2012, 09:21 AM   #23
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wall to wall basement pour questions


Thanks for the help everyone, concrete was poured 2 weeks ago and went great. Here is a picture of what I ended up doing to be able to screed. Probably overkill for someone who's done this a few times, but it was a big help in my case. We were able to screed quickly and get everything floated with time to spare. Also used an extension ladder with some 2x4s and a roll of metal flashing to made a chute which worked very well. Did not use it quite the way I intended but it still turned out to be very helpful.

Now that it's been 2 weeks - am I good to start moving some things in there (nothing heavy like a car or big equipment)?

Again everyone - thanks for the help!


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