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Old 03-02-2013, 09:15 AM   #1
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tamping fill


i am filling a hole where i replaced a 3" pvc pipe under my slab. patch will be about 1-1 1/2", same as the slab floor is now. i need to know when i have it packing well enough to put the concrete in.


Last edited by Fix'n it; 06-20-2013 at 09:32 PM.
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Old 03-02-2013, 09:22 AM   #2
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What are you using for the fill? If you use stone it will pack itself just fine in a hole that small and shallow. You could use a 2x4 on end to tamp it as you fill it.

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Old 03-02-2013, 09:47 AM   #3
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i am going to start with the dirt that i took out of that hole. up to about 3-4". then i will use the small rubble and stone from busting out that hole. then the concrete.
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:11 AM   #4
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You will get much better results using clean stone, coarse sand, or crushed stone than using "dirt". As noted, crushed stone or small size (3/4" or less) natural stone will compact virtually under its own weight. Sand takes a small amount of effort with a tamper, which can be made by putting a small square of plywood on the end of a 2x4. "Dirt" is a poorly defined term that may include clay and silt, which can create all sorts of compaction issues, and are prone to frost heave (stone and coarse sand do not frost heave).
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Old 03-02-2013, 10:17 AM   #5
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yeah Dan, i know. but i would have to go get and move that stuff. what i have now is free and here, i'm using it. sides, its looking like i am going to be removing that, along with the rest of the floor, to lower it. in a couple years.

i am going to tamp the dirt down in layers as i go. i'm sure it will be ok.
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Old 03-02-2013, 11:31 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fix'n it View Post
i need to know when i have it packing well enough to put the concrete in.
if your existing "dirt" contains organics or clay its going to be difficult to compact.

if you're planning on removing the slab in a few years I'd follow Dan's recommendation and use some stone. Hard to tell from you photo but doesn't look like much, maybe a few buckets worth. I know "free" and the such, but if you come on here asking how to do something correctly you'll get comments on how to do it correctly. Might not mesh with how your want to do it. Sorry

But to answer your question, when it does not compact any more using the weight you are using to compact it.

Good luck!
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
if your existing "dirt" contains organics or clay its going to be difficult to compact.

iI know "free" and the such, but if you come on here asking how to do something correctly you'll get comments on how to do it correctly. Might not mesh with how your want to do it. Sorry

But to answer your question, when it does not compact any more using the weight you are using to compact it.
that is actually a good thing = it won't settle as much.

there is more than 1 way to skin a cat. just because its not the "best" way, doesn't mean that its a "bad" way.

i will be using a long 4x4. if it doesn't settle when i step on it, i am calling it good and mixing the concrete.

pics later today.
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Old 03-03-2013, 08:41 AM   #8
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t
there is more than 1 way to skin a cat. just because its not the "best" way, doesn't mean that its a "bad" way.
oh. i say this with all due respect.
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Old 03-06-2013, 11:51 AM   #9
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then why ask ??????????
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:40 PM   #10
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I believe that fernco coupling thats gonna be under the slab should be a full band or mission coupling.
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Old 03-06-2013, 02:46 PM   #11
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Organic material in fill is bad because it degrades over time causing voids in your soil. Voids where water can get in and wash more of your soil away. Over time this is what will cause your settling.


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