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-   -   Sweating my upcoming pour (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/sweating-my-upcoming-pour-144556/)

CplDevilDog 05-22-2012 07:23 PM

Sweating my upcoming pour
 
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So I've poured a couple of trench footers, post piers and even a few beers but I'm not a Concrete Guy by any stretch of the imagination and my upcoming slab is starting to keep me up at night.

The slab is just the 1st step in the Fish Pond and looks something like this

Attachment 51259

Attachment 51260


I'm planning on pouring the 3 piers with 3000PSI and #4 bar up into the slab and the slab in Air-entrained, 5000PSI w/Fibers #4 @ 18" OC

One thing that really has me sweating is having to "wet float" the entire back half of the slab due to the existing rock conditions.

Is 2 CY manageable by 3 people in a day with a 9CF mixer?

Canarywood1 05-22-2012 08:15 PM

All depends on the people, you say your mixer is 9cf,that's only 6 batches.

jomama45 05-22-2012 10:39 PM

Wet-screeding isn't near as complicated as one would think. Concrete has a natural tendancy to self-level, which helps immensly when trying to get concrete level. I'm sure there's been day's where I've wet-screeded 20-30 yards of concrete w/o issue. I don't think you'll have much problem, but I might suggest you cut-back on the portland cement a bit if you don't want the concrete to take off on you. I can't think of a reason to pour 5000 psi concrete for something that will take so little load, especially when the "con's" of pouring with so much cement could likely outweigh the benefits.

Mort 05-22-2012 11:33 PM

Yeah, 5000psi seems like overkill. Usually that is reserved for road paving or huge mat footings. A 3000psi with fibers and air should be more than sufficient and much easier to work with.

CplDevilDog 05-23-2012 06:31 AM

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Thanks guys.

Yeah sorry it is 4000 PSI (Specifically Quikrete Crack Resistant Mix).

I had planned on using this model mixer but now I see it weighs almost 1000lbs :eek:

I have to do some pretty outrageous manuevering at the site including pushing it up a flight of 4 concrete steps by hand

Attachment 51288


:no: So that's out. The retaining wall is gone and the whole mess is covered in gravel to make a ramp of sorts but its still by hand.

Maybe something more my speed

7echo 05-23-2012 09:08 PM

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One of these would save you having to push/pull a mixer into the yard...:whistling2:

Mort 05-23-2012 11:38 PM

Hell yeah, I think everyone needs a 63 meter pump! Just make sure you don't have any bridges that are rated less than 160,000lbs.

CplDevilDog 05-25-2012 11:36 AM

Since the entire slab is below grade I'm thinking of wet screeding the entire thing.

I'll probably use my aluminum straight edge clamped to a 2x4 for a screed and snap level lines at slab top and screed top.

Thinking of scrapping the power mixer entirely and going with a mixing tub. I'll have Surface bonding cement to do a week later, core grout the week after that and mortar for veneer stone two weeks after that. By the time I move the mixer that many times I could have bought it.

One person hauling sacks & water, a second mixing and pouring down a chute and me in the hole with rake, shovel and screed.

Pumper truck might be the way to go....

jomama45 05-25-2012 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CplDevilDog (Post 927014)
Thanks guys.

Yeah sorry it is 4000 PSI (Specifically Quikrete Crack Resistant Mix).

I had planned on using this model mixer but now I see it weighs almost 1000lbs :eek:

I have to do some pretty outrageous manuevering at the site including pushing it up a flight of 4 concrete steps by hand

Attachment 51288


:no: So that's out. The retaining wall is gone and the whole mess is covered in gravel to make a ramp of sorts but its still by hand.

Maybe something more my speed


To be honest, our mortar mixers our both over 700#'s, and I don't think we'd have much problem with getting them up that walk, especially if you indeed already have a gravel ramp. I'd consider at least a smaller mixer, like at least a 6 cubic foot, for the amount you need to pour.

And keep in mind, those mixers don't hold as much as they're rated for, at least as far as I recall. You're going to spend alot of time & hard labor mixing that much concrete by hand.

If it was me, at least as a professional, I'd order ready-mix and either attempt to buggy it into the back, or have two of my laborers wheel up the ramp, with partial wheelbarrows. 2 yards would only be about 25-30 partial wheelbarrows, or 12-15 per guy...........

CplDevilDog 05-27-2012 08:17 AM

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Oh, sorry, I forget to mention 28' driveway that rises 16' just prior to the steps. :huh:

There she is:

Attachment 51472


Is mixing by hand that tough? If I get 4 guys (or even 5) I can keep the 4th guy busy grading the area for a patio and rotate everybody every hour or so.

The other option is to buy a good used mixer, keep it on site for the Summer and then sell it.

Jrrckd 05-31-2012 01:57 AM

I had a similar situation, up a steep 50' driveway hill, then around a 34' deep house with mixer truck at the street only. We wanted a 55' x 15' patio poured behind the house, plus a 4' x 32' walk around the side. That was a good size job. The guy I hired used a pump trailer, working the hose on the ground from the trailer to the farthest point and worked his way back towards the front of the house. He removed a 4' to 5' section of hose each time he needed to. That was the easy part. Had never seen such a thing before and wondered how he could do it so reasonably, knowing how much a pump truck would have cost. You may want to look into renting a pump trailer from your ready mix supplier... Just make sure you have the finishers on hand to keep up with the 'crete,

CplDevilDog 05-31-2012 07:05 AM

Thanks. I looked into the Pumper Trailer rentals and they were pretty reasonable.

If it wasn't for the other mixes I have to do I think I would have gone that route but since I have to do:

18 Bags of Surface Bonding Cement
48 Bags of Cell Grout
18ish Bags of Mortar

I think the Mortar Box is the way to go. I'm looking at this 8.5CF one here

Figure I can sell it for 50% at the end of all my upcoming Masonry work.

Anyone have any experience doing this by hand?

If each 80lb bag of Concrete yields .6CF of crete. 1.75 CY = 48 CF of crete = 80 Bags 6CF of mix in each Mortar Box load = 10 Bags/Mix = 8 Mixes

How much pizza and beer do I need?

biggles 05-31-2012 07:09 AM

have them delivery the bags of concrete on pallets and crane it over onto the grass at the top of those steps or as far into the yard as can...

CplDevilDog 05-31-2012 07:52 AM

Aye.

No good though. The crane would have to be a monster to reach over the railing.

Using a Dingo with pallet forks to move small pallet loads at a time. One guy on the street breaking the pallets down onto empty pallets, one guy at the top unloading the small pallets and rotate the pallets.

Dingo gets here tomorrow with Hydraulic Breaker to finish getting rid of nasty old rock. 70% chance of rain :censored:

CplDevilDog 06-18-2012 10:20 AM

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Good thing I'm still on schedule :no:

Anyway, here's where I am now.

Attachment 52634


Put the plumbing in last week.

Attachment 52633


And planning on using a 3.5-5CF Gas Mixer and wheelbarrow along with this set up to get the concrete in place.

Attachment 52635


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