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-   -   Stained cinder block (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/stained-cinder-block-175588/)

bryanp22 03-26-2013 06:53 PM

Stained cinder block
 
1 Attachment(s)
I've attached a photo of cinder block that is at the top of my basement wall. I have three blocks that look like this. I believe this is occurring because I have concrete steps on the other side of the wall. The top of the steps are flat though so water may run towards the block when raining . What should I do to fix the issue? I know it has not been caulked in years and ill fix that. Will that be enough or do the steps need to slope away from the house.

bryanp22 03-26-2013 06:56 PM

Sorry my iphone posted the same message twice so I deleted it. My follow-up question is below.

bryanp22 03-26-2013 06:59 PM

I am not sure I could add slope to the top of the steps without tearing them out and I did not really want to do that.

Fix'n it 03-26-2013 09:04 PM

post pic/s of the steps.

stadry 03-27-2013 10:16 AM

you're getting some moisture causing efflorescent salts,,, you can regrade the steps w/stuff from the apron/vest store IF you properly prep the steps,,, use a joint sealant w/backer rod, NEVER caulk,,, we like either polyurethane or 100% silicone tooled per directions

bryanp22 03-28-2013 08:10 AM

What type of concrete do you use for regrading? Do I have to add rebar or anything where I regreade?

stadry 03-28-2013 08:28 AM

concrete is incorrect mtl,,, regrade w/patching mortar instead,,, BUT properly prep the existing steps AND apply to wet ( no standing wtr - surface saturated dry = won't accept any more wtr ) steps :thumbsup:

Maintenance 6 03-28-2013 08:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsreallyconc (Post 1146915)
you're getting some moisture causing efflorescent salts,,, you can regrade the steps w/stuff from the apron/vest store IF you properly prep the steps,,, use a joint sealant w/backer rod, NEVER caulk,,, we like either polyurethane or 100% silicone tooled per directions

Would you explain the difference between joint sealant and caulk?

bryanp22 03-28-2013 11:28 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Here are pictures of the steps. I think to answer the question on caulk. Some people maybe think of caulk as something that shrinks when it dries and is not flexible like acrylic latex instead of say silicone. I just think of it more that its in a tube that I use a caulk gun to apply.

stadry 03-29-2013 07:58 AM

as best i can,,, joint sealants are designed for 2-sid'd adhesion where there is a significant rqmt for expansion/contraction/adhesion/cohesion,,, caulks are generally static in performance


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