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Old 10-06-2012, 10:37 AM   #1
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Slab help needed


I've got a detached garage that is 15' from this 50 year old silver maple that I do not want to get rid of or jeopardize killing. My garage is about 24" off of the property line and I cannot move or build any closer.

The problem with this situation is that over time, the roots have buckled and ruined the slab of the garage. I cannot afford to completely rebuild the garage, so I have an idea to lift the structure in order to rebuild the foundation of the garage.

My questions are regarding the tree. If I am able to successfully lift the structure and demo the foundation, how can I help protect the new slab without killing the tree? From what I have read, cutting roots any more than 20' from the trunk will severely stress the tree and harm or kill it.

If I were to add a foot or so of dirt on top of the roots before pouring concrete would it help act as a buffer between the slab and the roots or would the roots just grow towards the concrete effectively ruining it again?

I am not planning to be here for much longer, but this is something that needs to be addressed. One corner of the garage is 2" lower than the opposing, and that entire side is falling.

Any help is appreciated!

Graham
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Old 10-06-2012, 02:51 PM   #2
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Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sarasota,Florida
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Slab help needed


Quote:
Originally Posted by gjones View Post
I've got a detached garage that is 15' from this 50 year old silver maple that I do not want to get rid of or jeopardize killing. My garage is about 24" off of the property line and I cannot move or build any closer.

The problem with this situation is that over time, the roots have buckled and ruined the slab of the garage. I cannot afford to completely rebuild the garage, so I have an idea to lift the structure in order to rebuild the foundation of the garage.

My questions are regarding the tree. If I am able to successfully lift the structure and demo the foundation, how can I help protect the new slab without killing the tree? From what I have read, cutting roots any more than 20' from the trunk will severely stress the tree and harm or kill it.

If I were to add a foot or so of dirt on top of the roots before pouring concrete would it help act as a buffer between the slab and the roots or would the roots just grow towards the concrete effectively ruining it again?

I am not planning to be here for much longer, but this is something that needs to be addressed. One corner of the garage is 2" lower than the opposing, and that entire side is falling.

Any help is appreciated!

Graham

You can't have your cake and eat it too,it's one or the other,your call.
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