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Old 04-14-2014, 05:31 PM   #16
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


Weather plays an important role with concrete jobs and here is how it would be if I attempted it.

Start in the spring, nice temperature. I got a good start but summer is approaching and the temperature is now too hot. Well, as an optimist would say, at least I'm a little past half finished. Wait until fall to complete. I thought I got an early fall start but now according to the National Weather Service we will be getting our first snow storm. Dang it, my wife is on my case and I have two choices. Live with the complaining all winter or leave.

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Old 04-14-2014, 06:02 PM   #17
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
Are you considering doing a stamped concrete patio yourself???
Oh heck no. It would be a standard broomed-finish. I know better than to try stamping.

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And don't think for a minute that you can use non-air-entrained bagged concrete in a Chicago climate.............
Would be trucked-in in this large of size. But like I said, the scope may be drastically downsized.
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Old 04-14-2014, 08:29 PM   #18
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Doing the job over 4 days, how did you handle the joint with the previous day's work? Did you put a 2X across for each section, and then use the joint as a control joint?
Exactly... Just moved my 2x4 form over 5 feet, staked it, and poured between last pour and two end walls.

Yes, those were cold joints, but I had both bar and mesh tying everything together.... and 6 mill poly under it all for moisture control. I think I probably painted on a bonding agent on the edge as I went.... I often do.

I cut 5 foot control joints accross each 20 ft long pour also.

Besides cost efficiencies, (probably did it for 700 verse 2000), there was a technical consideration also. I was very concerned about possible water control and wanted a "perfect slope to one corner"... if I ever needed a sump.

I was worried that even with a couple of finishers, getting that perfect slope in a 20x20 might be difficult. By working in sections, I could control that perfect slope much easier than a "asses and elbows" work environment trying to pour 20x20 in one shot in an enclosed tight basement.

Never needed the sump.... it's been perfectly dry.

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Old 04-15-2014, 05:27 PM   #19
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Oh heck no. It would be a standard broomed-finish. I know better than to try stamping.



Would be trucked-in in this large of size. But like I said, the scope may be drastically downsized.
If that's the case, you might be able to handle it with someone who has decent experience, as well as a few other untrained hands. You might still consider splitting it into 2 pours though. You could always form a lower ledge for a strip of pavers between the two pours in case they don't match perfectly...........
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Old 04-15-2014, 05:39 PM   #20
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


Having worked with a masonry contractor in my younger days, let me just say that in the history of bad ideas, mixing, pouring, and finishing your own concrete with limited experience is #1.
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Old 04-15-2014, 05:49 PM   #21
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


I was thinking you could form it with concrete keyway and you wouldn't have to strip it and it would help to keep it from heaving. You would still get the checkerboard look.
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Old 04-16-2014, 01:06 AM   #22
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Abridged story: we want a large patio off the back of our house, about 550 sqft based on the original design..... "How hard can it be?" - she says
I had a 27 x 21 patio done a few years ago. Thats 567 Sqft for the patio plus another 120 sqft for a walk. Never even crossed my mind to bag it.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:03 AM   #23
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


Hammerlane, that is nice I like the way you rounded the corners.
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Old 04-16-2014, 09:19 AM   #24
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


Did you make saw cuts for control joints?
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:29 AM   #25
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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I've done 400 sq feet in a basement alone, all from sack concrete (didn't want to pay for a pump truck and a couple of finishers.)

Did it in four mix/pours.... did it over 4 days total, over several weeks,(not counting my prep time.).

Used remesh and rebar to tie everything together.

My son and I got over 200 bags down there over several days... We could get a truck close to an outside exit.

I have my own little 2 bag mixer.

I would just keep mixing, pouring, screeding, finishing and back again.... keeping an unset section in front of me.

I'm a GC, not a concrete pro.... but it can be done if you get organized and are strong enough to handle many 80 bags, and have the time.

This was my own home... and I just did it when I had free time. Each day pouring, probably took 4-5 hours working alone. But I was organized, with concrete sack next to my mixer and wood( or the poured concrete after the first pour) so I could just move my mixer along and dump.

Just kind of repitive work.......

Good luck
Lot of cold seams there. so how did it hold up to cracking when it was all said and done?
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Old 04-16-2014, 12:22 PM   #26
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Lot of cold seams there. so how did it hold up to cracking when it was all said and done?
Well... it has performed excellently..... no moisture... no evident cracking

.... but not necessarily fair to say as everything was working with/for me... because I was on virgin unescavated soil.... our "soil" is decomposed granite.... and I epoxied this lower storage/basement area... and I can see no cracking in the cold or cut relief cuts. (And I see no crack in the epoxy coating, which I think would crack)

And I was rebarred and remeshed together.

I did a third car garage in a very similar manner... and I had the chance to look at years later.... and while my cold joint was flush/level... it had a relief crack. But I tool/round my edges, and it looks just like an intended reliefe joint anyways

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Old 04-16-2014, 10:01 PM   #27
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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I was thinking you could form it with concrete keyway and you wouldn't have to strip it and it would help to keep it from heaving. You would still get the checkerboard look.
The keyway without the rebar sticking out is exactly how I poured the sidewalk along one side of our house, about 30 years ago. That sidewalk is 40 feet long and 5' 5" wide. Each block was about 5' 5" square. The sidewalk is 3-1/2" thick to accommodate 2x4 form.

Just nailed a tapered strip of wood to the 2x4 form to form the key the width of the sidewalk. The taper made it easy to remove the form.

Thirty years later, the top surface of the sidewalk at each joint is still perfectly aligned like the time the sidewalk was poured. I can verify that the tapered keyway works perfectly to keep the blocks aligned vertically for 30 years.

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Old 04-16-2014, 10:16 PM   #28
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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The keyway without the rebar sticking out is exactly how I poured the sidewalk along one side of our house, about 30 years ago. That sidewalk is 40 feet long and 5' 5" wide. Each block was about 5' 5" square. The sidewalk is 3-1/2" thick to accommodate 2x4 form.

Just nailed a tapered strip of wood to the 2x4 form to form the key the width of the sidewalk. The taper made it easy to remove the form.

Thirty years later, the top surface of the sidewalk at each joint is still perfectly aligned like the time the sidewalk was poured. I can verify that the tapered keyway works perfectly to keep the blocks aligned vertically for 30 years.

HomeRepairGuy
YES,,, ^^^^^As Home Guy says.... if I was on grade with surface soils... put in a key and some bar....

heck.... it is virtually no more work/expense.... although I did not need it in my case, I probably should have spent 20 more minutes and formed in a key as just extra and cheap insurance.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:25 PM   #29
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


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Did you make saw cuts for control joints?
May be hard to see but of course.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:38 PM   #30
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Should I even consider pouring my own patio?


Nice and neat/clean

Your edge looks great.... how'd you expose the rock in it.?

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