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Old 03-13-2012, 08:46 AM   #1
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


My friend has a home built in the late 1800s, in the North East. There are some spots with daylight showing. The house was inspected this way when they bought it and they were told it is structurely ok. They are mostly interested in patching these spots so that bugs, rodents, and cold air do not come through too much. Some of the holes are large enough that mice can squeeze through and this may actually be happening. WHat's the best way to seal this up?

this is not theirs, but is very similar.


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Old 03-13-2012, 08:58 AM   #2
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


Assuming the house is structurally sound as you state, it should be a relatively simple matter to patch any holes using mortar. If your friends are unfamilar with the process of placing mortar, they can hire a mason to do so, or you can purchase a book on construction of stone walls, which will discuss in detail how to mix, place and finish mortar.

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Old 03-13-2012, 01:47 PM   #3
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Assuming the house is structurally sound as you state, it should be a relatively simple matter to patch any holes using mortar. If your friends are unfamilar with the process of placing mortar, they can hire a mason to do so, or you can purchase a book on construction of stone walls, which will discuss in detail how to mix, place and finish mortar.
I figured Mortar was an option, but wasn't sure if expanding foam or something else might be better/easier/more efficient... that said, if mortar is the way to go, it shouldn't be a problem at all.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:28 PM   #4
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


foam has its place but not in a stone foundation wall imo
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Old 03-16-2012, 06:52 AM   #5
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


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foam has its place but not in a stone foundation wall imo
Thanks for the help. Seems like a pretty quick and easy project.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:24 PM   #6
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


Am I seeing that picture wrong, or is that a rectangular hole for a foundation vent? A few bucks at the local you know where.
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:44 PM   #7
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


Remove any loose morter first.
Mix up some morter and dump it into a mason bag. It looks like a heavy duty pastery bag. Lowes and HD both have them. Now you will not have it all over the place.
Make sure to clean off any access morter with a wet sponge before it drys.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:58 AM   #8
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


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Originally Posted by ratherbefishing View Post
Am I seeing that picture wrong, or is that a rectangular hole for a foundation vent? A few bucks at the local you know where.
You certainly are seeing the picture right, but I think perhaps missed that I said the picture above was not the basement in question, rather a similar type of foundation. Thanks though, I do appreciate the suggestion.


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Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Remove any loose morter first.
Mix up some morter and dump it into a mason bag. It looks like a heavy duty pastery bag. Lowes and HD both have them. Now you will not have it all over the place.
Make sure to clean off any access morter with a wet sponge before it drys.
Thank you! WIll do.


Also, i'm curious to know what the reasoning is behind avoiding the expanding foam solution.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:13 AM   #9
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Rock and mortar stone foundation/basement question


You should also avoid using portland cement mortar. Do a search on here for "lime mortar".

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