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-   -   repairing concrete driveway (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/repairing-concrete-driveway-178079/)

Amateuralex 04-25-2013 01:03 PM

repairing concrete driveway
 
I have a reasonably small area of concrete in front of my garage that's probably 80 square feet. It has some cracks and few chips and one really bad area that's about a foot in diameter, almost 2 inches deep.

I'm planning to try quikrete sand mix for this. Power wash it, clean it with a concrete cleaner, and apply the quikrete according to the instructions. I can't find a more promising product.

Any advice or other suggestions?

stadry 04-25-2013 01:23 PM

might want to determine WHY this hole in your d/w 1st,,, we repair conc for a living & have never used this product so i'm ignorant if its suitably correct or not,,, ' can't find a more promising product. ' = all you did was hit the apron/vest stores,,, there are correct products avail BUT not as cheap as what you've selected as correct

Amateuralex 04-25-2013 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsreallyconc (Post 1167076)
might want to determine WHY this hole in your d/w 1st,,, we repair conc for a living & have never used this product so i'm ignorant if its suitably correct or not,,, ' can't find a more promising product. ' = all you did was hit the apron/vest stores,,, there are correct products avail BUT not as cheap as what you've selected as correct

Understood. As for why it's there, I guess I am beginning to believe that cars parked there drop their salt and other treatment. It's right where you'd park a car. Otherwise, yes, drainage may be the problem, but we don't have the resources to fix that right now. Nor do we have the resources to bust it out and repour it or anything like that.

A patch that removed the tripping hazard for even 3 years would be worth the effort.

We've been in the house for a little over a year so I don't have a good background to tell right now.

As for hitting the big box stores, you're correct, but I don't know where else to go. Any suggestions? The Quikrete sand mix is very cheap so I'd happily pay a lot more for a better product, just tell me what to use ;-)

Amateuralex 04-28-2013 10:23 PM

Ok I've gotten advice from many sources on this. Most mock the idea of patching. I'm still considering trying. Looking at Ardex CP now. Anyone have experience with this?

RWolff 04-28-2013 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amateuralex (Post 1169167)
Ok I've gotten advice from many sources on this. Most mock the idea of patching. I'm still considering trying. Looking at Ardex CP now. Anyone have experience with this?

The big problem with patching small defects and this hole in a concrete slab or driveway is the patch just doesn't cure well or adhere well and typically will flake and crack and then come off. The patch made of concrete will shrink a little as it cures and then dries, while the existing concrete doesn't.

They make concrete patching compound, I used it at work on a garage door threshold a few years ago with excellent results, however, at home on concrete where the dog's area is I used it to repair a damaged spot caused by ice, it lasted maybe a year and started coming apart.

Patches just don't work well as a permanent fix, while cutting the damaged chunk out and pouring a new piece in would, but that's a lot more involved.
Your 12" diameter x 2" deep hole- it that was say, cut out to an 18" square with a carbide circular blade or something to get decent straight sides, then you filled that with new concrete, it will stay there, but there's no way to know if there's rebar or what in there.

I guess if it was me, I'd cut that down to the bottom of the slab to the gravel or whatever is below it, and fill it with new, but you don't want sloping sides in the hole that you have to "feather" the new concrete to level out- it won't last, which is why a carbide blade cutting to square up the edges of the hole 90 degrees to the top is what I would do- avoids having to "feather" the concrete.

Amateuralex 04-29-2013 06:57 AM

Thanks RwolfF! Yeah when I read the Ardex patching instructions, they tell you to use a saw to cut out a rectangular space.

My comprehending this is probably finally good news, since it means I won't be wasting my time trying. I can power wash the area and mix up some patching compound etc, but I am not really up for buying a saw with a diamond blade and going through the pain of cutting it all out for a patch that may not last long.

stadry 04-29-2013 07:57 AM

any contractor supply house will carry polymer-modified conc repair mortars/mix,,, depending on the depth of the repair, they can be extended by adding 3/8" clean crushed stone,,, many are also suitable for ' feathere dging ',,, the prime key to a successful repair is GOOD PREP.

most repair mix is stronger than the original conc so ' 3 years would be worth the effort ' is low IF the repair is done properly,,, it is also better for tensio & flexural strength,,, adhesion is superb - again, all depends on the prep !.

Amateuralex 04-29-2013 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsreallyconc (Post 1169280)
any contractor supply house will carry polymer-modified conc repair mortars/mix,,, depending on the depth of the repair, they can be extended by adding 3/8" clean crushed stone,,, many are also suitable for ' feathere dging ',,, the prime key to a successful repair is GOOD PREP.

most repair mix is stronger than the original conc so ' 3 years would be worth the effort ' is low IF the repair is done properly,,, it is also better for tensio & flexural strength,,, adhesion is superb - again, all depends on the prep !.

Thanks for the info.

We had a concrete contractor come out this weekend to look, and he said that here in Michigan no patch could last through a single season of freeze/thaw. Does that sound right to you?

RWolff 04-29-2013 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amateuralex (Post 1169291)
Thanks for the info.

We had a concrete contractor come out this weekend to look, and he said that here in Michigan no patch could last through a single season of freeze/thaw. Does that sound right to you?

Sounds like he wants to sell a new slab or more extensive work... a patch done right will hold longer than that, but it's not permanent, if we say 3-4 years for the sake of argument it would probably be pretty accurate.
I can dig not wanting to buy a saw etc, you might be able to RENT one for the day cheap, or if you have a circular saw- just buying a concrete blade for it.
Barring that, a hammer and wide flat chisel carefully removing crumbly bad material, power washing it and patching per the instructions on the bag will do for a while.
I think it was a polymer modified patching product I was referring to, it came in a 5 or 10# bag. There may be some better products similar to that but that was what was available to me here in the hardware store.
Maybe you can google search and find something better if you still want to go with the clean and patch instead of cutting out and filling with new concrete replacement.

stadry 04-29-2013 08:40 AM

horsepuckey :furious: MiDOT regularly does this patching either as a contractor bid item OR w/their maint crews - roadways AND bdges,,, that's where i learned it - NYSDOT, PennDOT, CTDOT, Plattsburgh AFB, Andrews AFB, yada, yada, yada,,, sounds as if that contractor either is ignorant of the mtl/method OR has other motive,,, state dot & fed specs often require 1" deep sawcut to outline the patch however that spec was written prior to feather-edging mtls' invention & improvement

Amateuralex 04-29-2013 08:51 AM

OK yeah that's what I thought guys. That's what I had read. Especially about the feather edging...I read that it's legit.

The vibe I got from my contractor is that he wanted his $1900 bid to rip it out and repour it to look more favorable.

Hey itsreallyconc, for a DIY guy like me can you recommend me ordering the Ardex product, over going with Quickrete or what I can find at a big box? Or can you recommend another product? Ardex CP is $35 a bag or so, and I think that I'd only need 2-3 bags. It says it doesn't need an additive or a cleaner either, while the Quickrete stuff needs a bonding additive first either as a slurry or just straight out. The Ardex CP says just add aggregate when patching deeper than an inch, which I'd only need for one spot.

I have a power washer, I've read about concrete cleaners to clean away oil and grease etc, I am OK with chipping away the loose material etc, and I've done a fair amount of interior tiling so I know that proper water ratios and favorable conditions for curing are critical etc.

stadry 04-29-2013 09:35 AM

forget the ardex & just use the quikrete,,, we use it all the time when its less expensive than ordering up redi-mix conc,,, the big problem w/quikrete is caused by users adding too much water destroying the optimum water:cement ratio

caution: chip out bad conc down to good the stuff even IF it means going all the way down to the base mtl,,, that sutff's so cheap why waste any labor ? personally, we would do that instead of degreaser, cleaners, et al

RWolff 04-29-2013 12:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Amateuralex (Post 1169319)
OK yeah that's what I thought guys. That's what I had read. Especially about the feather edging...I read that it's legit.

The vibe I got from my contractor is that he wanted his $1900 bid to rip it out and repour it to look more favorable.

Hey itsreallyconc, for a DIY guy like me can you recommend me ordering the Ardex product, over going with Quickrete or what I can find at a big box? Or can you recommend another product?

LOL tell him to take a hike, he basically wants to make a mountain out of a molehill, it's a driveway it's not fine china, it's going to be chipped, crack, oil stains, etc etc., he just doesn't want to do a $100 job when he can get $1900

I'm not a fan of Quickrete sand mix or concrete mix for
patching like this, but they do make this which I have never tried:

http://www.packagepavement.com/concr...cer_movie.html

Quikrete Concrete Resurfacer (must be mechanically mixed.) A special blend of portland cement, sand, polymer modifiers and other additives. Designed to provide a shrinkage compensated repair material for making thin repairs to sound concrete in need of surface renewal.

stadry 04-29-2013 04:53 PM

< LAUGHING > that's funny,,, the 1st hgwy patching job we got was for NYSDOT @ $ 5 per #,,, used a trlr load of set 45 ( magnesium phosphate conc patch developed for airstrips in vietNam ),,, the avg patch cost nysdot approx $ 45 per sf & that was over 35yrs ago :thumbup: as i recall, it was the 1st hgwy patch job in the usa,,, now all the states do it but prices have come WAY down :mad:

IF you think curing's going to be a big problem, in direct hot sun sprinkle it w/wtr OR lay some burlap on it & sprinkle that,,, for cold temps ( below freezing ), grab up the elec blanket off the guest room's bed :eek:

Fix'n it 04-29-2013 09:19 PM

if you get tired of all that, and don't care how it looks = clean, "cold patch", tamp, done.

i did it at my MIL's house a few years ago. and it still looks like i did it last week.


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