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Old 01-30-2013, 08:24 PM   #1
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


I need to install a bunch of threaded rods in concrete and I'm going to use epoxy (Simpson Set-XP, to be precise). The recommendation is to use a nylon brush and compressed air---at least 80 psi, for a total of at least 8 seconds per hole. I've got the brush, but I don't have an air compressor and would prefer not to buy one. I'm going to have at least 50 holes (5/8" diameter, 4+ inches deep) to deal with.

Is there a reasonable alternative to an air compressor? If not, is there a relatively cheap air compressor that you would recommend? Thanks.

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Old 01-30-2013, 08:32 PM   #2
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Can you borrow one from a buddy?

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Old 01-30-2013, 08:34 PM   #3
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Rent one!
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:37 PM   #4
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Use the exhaust port on your vacuum cleaner ---neck down the hose to a small section of tubing or pipe----
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:45 PM   #5
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Can I ask what the rod will be holding down? Would red heads work?
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Old 01-30-2013, 08:45 PM   #6
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


I use a shop vac to suck it out, hate seeing dust blown up in the air everywhere.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:14 PM   #7
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


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Rent one!
Unfortunately, I can't do them all at once, so I'd have to rent it several times, and just as well buy one...
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:22 PM   #8
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


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Use the exhaust port on your vacuum cleaner ---neck down the hose to a small section of tubing or pipe----
This sounds like a possibility. The good old shop vac (or leaf blower) could generate a lot of pressure, if I can rig up the right sort of nozzle. One requirement is that the "compressed air nozzle must reach the bottom of the hole", so it's got to be something about 6 inches long and less than 5/8" diameter.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:29 PM   #9
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


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Can I ask what the rod will be holding down? Would red heads work?
This is for a "seismic retrofit" on my house. For some of the rods, pullout is an issue, and those definitely need to be epoxied. So, I figured I just as well do the same thing for all of them. If you're interested, see the 7:35 mark of this video for a good illustration of what I'm doing:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d91_6...5802141ACD3CD5
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:40 PM   #10
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Canned air like they use to blow out electronics?
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:49 PM   #11
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


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Canned air like they use to blow out electronics?
Could go bigger and rent an oxy bottle from a welding supply shop
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:43 PM   #12
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


Use the vacuum next to the drill all the while you are drilling. Negative pressure there beats positive nearly every time when drilling and there will be very little residue in the hole when finished.
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:09 PM   #13
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


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Is there a reasonable alternative to an air compressor? If not, is there a relatively cheap air compressor that you would recommend? Thanks.
I have always used one of these:

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Old 02-01-2013, 06:24 PM   #14
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


go to your local tool store, any kind and get a compressor you will be glad you did. so many other uses for it.
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Old 02-01-2013, 11:17 PM   #15
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Removing dust from holes drilled in concrete


I went through the same thing....



Use a shop vac to 'suck' up as much as you can....if you take a real small hose....say 1/4" poly tubing like you use for the water supply for the ice maker...put one end up in the hose of the vac...other down the hole...it will get most of it....

Then take the same hose and use the exhaust port of your shop vac.....if you cup your hand over the exhaust..push the hose through your fingers...quite a bit of air comes out....

Warning....you can get a good puff of dust out of that hole....it's messy.

You know you have it cleaned out when you drop the rod in there and you get a nice 'clink' sound. If it's a 'thud', you still have dust down there.

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