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Old 09-29-2013, 01:58 AM   #31
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


Ah, yes- I know how that goes. Thankfully, it's not an issue!

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Old 09-29-2013, 10:50 AM   #32
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


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Aww, thanks! But seeing as I'm going into a Linguistics major.. I ought to hope I have decent grammar!
I was a journalism major for a year in college. It still makes me cringe to read internet shorthand.

I suppose I should add that you may want to consider some big picture sort of stuff before taking on a project this large. Afterall, you're not exactly remodeling a bathroom.

Is this house somewhere you see yourself in 15-20 years? Is it big enough to raise a family in? Will your career take you somewhere that the commute will be overwhelming? How are the schools? Neighbors? From personal experience I can tell you that some things that seem small initially can prove unbearable in the long term.
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Old 09-29-2013, 11:02 AM   #33
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


Yes to the first two- The second, no. Schools in-district are crap- I studied here till 5th grade- but good ones are a hop, skip and jump- a drive I've made 5 days a week since I left the district. There are no right-next-door neighbors, and I love the townspeople.

No matter If I choose to buy this house or not is silly in that regard- I'm looking for a house in the immediate area. And the only one I won't buy no matter what is the one across the street from my dad. But, considering a family, I like that its on 2.8 acres- chickens, bees, maybe a horse. Cats. Its also really close to town- like a few blocks from my dad's- for a house on a bit of land, which is very nice.
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:49 PM   #34
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


the more modern houses. what kind of foundations do they have ?
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:59 PM   #35
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


theres not much to this job but to call the house movers. they will jack up the house to get it on crib supports, then you level the ground all the way around, we used a pick and shovel. do not fill in. you must dig down til its level all the way around. then set your forms for concrete. digging is self explanatory and setting forms can be tricky but there are detailed instructions on the internet. it helps to have someone thats done it before. we used a pump truck to fill the forms but thats expensive. five people with wheel barrows might be able to carry one yard at a time to fill the forms. then set the house back down again. seems like the house movers do most of the uncertainties. you could do it with 4 or 6 20 ton jacks but i would not want to be under there. (the cribbing prevents the house from falling on anyone) but the house movers are so much faster. and when they need to shoot support beams under the house, they will show you where they need a hole made. so i would call the house movers first to find out what they would charge to lift it then set it down again.
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Old 09-29-2013, 04:34 PM   #36
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


Regarding Shane's concrete placement methods, if a mixer can't get to the foundation with his chutes, get a pump. Wheeling concrete sucks, and is rarely done on foundations. It's not even really possible for the stem walls, because they're too tall for the wheelbarrow to dump into.

Pumps are expensive, but worth the money.
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Old 09-29-2013, 04:56 PM   #37
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


we did all our foundations like that. your right it sucked. but we just did the footings and it was done in under an hour. we layed blocks on top of that so the only pouring we had to do was on our bond beams. (vertical and horizontal pours to hold the blocks together). and we used an on site mixer for those. pump trucks are awesome but we only used those where it was impossible to get a wheel barrow around the house. I forget what that pump truck cost but it was super expensive. i think we raised the house, poured the footings, layed the block and lowered the house for about 4,000 dollars. and the block work was only done because we were raising it too. i think a person could raise and lower the house for about 1500 if that was all they had to do. i think the pump truck was 1000 dollars additional. what does 5 men with 5 wheel barrows cost? 25 dollars each without the finish work. cleanup etc. my dad was cheap. we saved money on everything,in exchange for backbreaking labor. hauling that hose was harder than pushing the wheelbarrow, but we did not have a choice.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:03 PM   #38
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


Shayne, I get that you live in Alaska, where men are men etc., but a yard of concrete weighs about 4000 lbs. If there is a man in Alaska who can wheel 4000 lbs about in a wheelbarrow, why they should be in the World's Strongest Man competition. As to getting five men to wheel a wheelbarrow, that seems to be beyond physics, but maybe you have some unusual concrete wheelbarrows up there.

More realistically, one man could wheel perhaps 200 lbs of concrete in a barrow, which means 20 wheelbarrow loads per yard. Unless you have a lot of people and a lot of wheelbarrows, and they manage to stay out of each other's way, you are going to run out of time for the truck, and you will end up wasting most of the load. Unless you plan to mix your own concrete.

The cost figures you presented seem amazing. I mean, raise and lower a house for $1500? I have been involved in half a dozen operations where houses or other structures were lifted and moved. The lowest cost operation was well over $20,000. But I guess things are different in Alaska. As for doing this work as a DIY project, I simply cannot recommend it. Too many opportunities to get killed, destroy the house, or both. Especially if the person in charge lacks appropriate experience.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:24 PM   #39
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


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theres not much to this job but to call the house movers. they will jack up the house to get it on crib supports, then you level the ground all the way around, we used a pick and shovel. do not fill in. you must dig down til its level all the way around. then set your forms for concrete. digging is self explanatory and setting forms can be tricky but there are detailed instructions on the internet. it helps to have someone thats done it before. we used a pump truck to fill the forms but thats expensive. five people with wheel barrows might be able to carry one yard at a time to fill the forms. then set the house back down again. seems like the house movers do most of the uncertainties. you could do it with 4 or 6 20 ton jacks but i would not want to be under there. (the cribbing prevents the house from falling on anyone) but the house movers are so much faster. and when they need to shoot support beams under the house, they will show you where they need a hole made. so i would call the house movers first to find out what they would charge to lift it then set it down again.

Ok, thanks! Of course, the person I hope to get to do the digging has a backhoe, and has laid foundation forms before, including the ones in my childhood home. That's no biggie. He also recommends cement trucks- and it's much faster, therefore worth it.

Would cribbing work, with a backhoe digging the foundation? Or would it be more logical to move the house? At this point, I think thats my main question- the actual doing of the foundation is covered, in my head.
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:26 PM   #40
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


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Regarding Shane's concrete placement methods, if a mixer can't get to the foundation with his chutes, get a pump. Wheeling concrete sucks, and is rarely done on foundations. It's not even really possible for the stem walls, because they're too tall for the wheelbarrow to dump into.

Pumps are expensive, but worth the money.
I'm counting on it- I helped my grandpa do mixed-ourselved and wheelbarrowed in foundation for his greenhouse, and doing that for a full-sized home seems like lunacy!
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Old 09-29-2013, 06:28 PM   #41
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


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Shayne, I get that you live in Alaska, where men are men etc., but a yard of concrete weighs about 4000 lbs. If there is a man in Alaska who can wheel 4000 lbs about in a wheelbarrow, why they should be in the World's Strongest Man competition. As to getting five men to wheel a wheelbarrow, that seems to be beyond physics, but maybe you have some unusual concrete wheelbarrows up there.

More realistically, one man could wheel perhaps 200 lbs of concrete in a barrow, which means 20 wheelbarrow loads per yard. Unless you have a lot of people and a lot of wheelbarrows, and they manage to stay out of each other's way, you are going to run out of time for the truck, and you will end up wasting most of the load. Unless you plan to mix your own concrete.

The cost figures you presented seem amazing. I mean, raise and lower a house for $1500? I have been involved in half a dozen operations where houses or other structures were lifted and moved. The lowest cost operation was well over $20,000. But I guess things are different in Alaska. As for doing this work as a DIY project, I simply cannot recommend it. Too many opportunities to get killed, destroy the house, or both. Especially if the person in charge lacks appropriate experience.

Ha! I was wondering.. Thanks for the explanation and clarification!
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:27 PM   #42
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


yards, feet,inches..... try to google how many yards in a barrow and you will get any thing from 4 to 20. is it liquid or solid? dirt or water? does it matter? we used big contracter wheel barrows and moved every drop, every time, and never had a shortage of volunteers. i was doing it since 14 years old and i could move more than my own weight with a fair amount of ease. it sucked. it was alot of work but we made the truck move whenever possible and his chute would get you half way there. and sometimes you could shoot it straight into the forms. in this case the truck would either have to drive around the house or barrow it. we never had any truck on the site more than two hours. when we poured the forms for the house lift, we did not have to move the house. just lift it and set it down again. you can move a house trailer for 500 and skirt and level it for another 500. pulling the temporary support beams under the house was the hard part. cuz the house was sitting on the ground. we trenched under it and used a winch to pull them thru. this is not a house move, simply a lift and set it down. you could do it with hydraulic jacks but to many things can go wrong. finding something strong enuff to jack on being the least of them. this is not the type of job to cut your teeth on but the first step would be to call a house mover and see what they need and what they might charge to just lift and set back down again.
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Old 09-29-2013, 09:59 PM   #43
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


For clarification, your standard Jackson wheelbarrow is 4 cubic feet. Since concrete weighs approximately 150lb/ft3 +/- that would be 600lbs if you piled it up. Most people like it about the 200lb mark, so like Daniel suggested, you're at about 16-20 wheelbarrows per yard. If it's a big house, you could be at 20-30yards on the footing alone, which would suck and cost you truck time and cold joints. Get the pump.
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Old 09-29-2013, 10:50 PM   #44
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Pouring a foundation under an old house?


i dont know why concret numbers are so jumbled up. some folks say 1 cubic yard is 2000 lbs at 200 lbs per barrow thats 10 loads. all i know is we moved 7 yards in 32 minutes. That was for one COMPLETE footing. so i dont quite speak the language. If we can move the truck we do. if we can barrow it we do. if it can be dug with a shovel...we dig it. Ive removed sewer tanks with a pick and shovel. Fuel tanks are easier. Im just the grunt. They point, i dig. The pump cost more than the concrete but if someone else is paying.... I called for confirmation on the lift and drop. We had a friend that was a house mover so we got a good price. But i imagine it has allot to do with how to get the beams under the house. Theres no shortcuts and its a pain. I think it took us a week.on a side note the internet says you get 10 minutes to move a yard we were only allowed 7. truck time. more confusion,i dont get it.i always wondered what the hurry was, nobody told me the truck was timing us. I know we went over a couple times(its alaska)its cold. And they told us when we went over. i thought they charged by the hour. 2 dollars a minute sounds fair. i would have paid the 20 dollars if they would have given us another 10 minutes but the boss was very unreasonable.
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Old 09-30-2013, 12:48 AM   #45
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