Pounds Per Square Inch Exerted On Concrete Slap On An Average 2300 Sq.ft. Brick Home. - Concrete, Stone & Masonry - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


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Old 10-26-2012, 06:45 PM   #1
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


I am looking for a rough number for pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slab on an average 2300 sq. ft. brick home. (one story) thanks

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Old 10-26-2012, 06:53 PM   #2
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


The ansewer is 0.
And it's a slab not a slap.

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Old 10-26-2012, 06:57 PM   #3
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


I Googled the heck out of this and the best estimate I can find is 50 lbs per square foot.

Thinking of going ballooning?

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Old 10-26-2012, 07:28 PM   #4
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


The house is held up by the footings and the piers not the slab.
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Old 10-26-2012, 07:51 PM   #5
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


the code requirement for living space live load = 40 pounds per square foot

typical dead load for walls, ceiling (interior) = 10 pounds per square foot

perimeter walls carry the ceiling, roof (any floor loads for additional stories) and walls loads. total load is dependent on the number of floors and the span of the roof and materials used.

as stated above this load is supported by the foundation walls and footing. should you have an interior load bearing wall then you would have a footing under it (under the slab).

exactly what are you looking for???
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:01 PM   #6
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


Sounds like someones doing there home work again.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:21 PM   #7
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


if so they'll have to do the math converting pounds per square foot to square inches and then over the entire square footage and not forget to carry the 1 .....
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Old 10-26-2012, 09:50 PM   #8
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


This is kind of interesting to me since I'm about to erect a large front porch on an old ranch house.

It will extend 12' from the house, and be 24' wide. Four fiberglass columns will carry the load down onto a concrete slab, so all the weight will be concentrated onto a small area of the slab.

I suppose some engineering needs to be done to ascertain the size of the slab footings in those locations where the columns will fall.


Due to this being a coastal house, there will be threaded steel rods running up through the columns to prevent wind lift.
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:57 AM   #9
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


don't forget your frost depth (minimum depth) footing .....
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Old 10-27-2012, 05:42 PM   #10
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Pounds per square inch exerted on concrete slap on an average 2300 sq.ft. brick home.


sorry I missed the last line of your post ....

if it is a coastal home depending on your distance from the water scouring may be a concern as well as the soil. I'd certainly recommend hiring a professional engineer (I'm sure you'll need a stamped set of drawings to get a permit) to evaluate your conditions and prepare a proper design.

Good luck!

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