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-   -   New Basement Entrance (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/new-basement-entrance-167475/)

4021 12-27-2012 02:02 AM

New Basement Entrance
 
I'm putting in a new basement entrance. The plan is to pour a 5' x 10' pad and foundation with block walls. The pad will be 7' below grade and 6" thick with wire reinforcing. The stair will be treated wood. Feel free to comment on any of the above, but, the 2 questions are ...1. Does the pad foundation need to be attached to the existing basement floor/foundation? If so, how is that done? And 2. How is the concrete block attached to the existing poured foundation wall?

cleveman 12-27-2012 04:36 AM

Where are you located? Put this on your profile and people won't have to ask.

I've put in three of these, covered and uncovered. In both cases, the area was formed up as a part of the basement (continuous footings and poured walls).

So in your case, you'll want to over-excavate to allow for the footings. Form these up and tie into your existing footings somehow (re-rod dowels drilled in and attached to existing with epoxy, etc.).

Then you will also have to attach the concrete block wall or poured wall. You're going with C block walls, so you'll have to drill into what you have, attach bolts, then do same with what you're adding. If you're attaching to C block, then drill in the core of each block or however often as necessary, put in a bent piece of rebar, and leave a fair amount sticking out. Then go to the top of the wall and knock out a piece so you can fill the whole core solid with grouting material. If you knock out this piece on the exterior, maybe you can get a piece of re-rod down in this core as well.

If you are connecting to a poured concrete wall, then just drill holes, insert re-bar, and fill with epoxy.

When you lay up your c block wall for the entrance, you'll want to insert the re-rod into holes in the block, then bend the re-bar a bit. If possible, you can bend it before you lay the block. Maybe it is not even necessary to bend the re-bars, but it won't hurt. After you are done laying this wall, insert re-bar vertically down that core, and fill it with grout. You can fill as many cores with re-bar and grout as you like, I think minimum of every 4'.

If you are leaving the entrance open, you may as well cap it off with solid block or fill all the cores. It would look nice to have a rowlock of brick on top.

Joe Carola 12-27-2012 06:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 4021 (Post 1080400)
I'm putting in a new basement entrance. The plan is to pour a 5' x 10' pad and foundation with block walls. The pad will be 7' below grade and 6" thick with wire reinforcing. The stair will be treated wood. Feel free to comment on any of the above, but, the 2 questions are ...1. Does the pad foundation need to be attached to the existing basement floor/foundation? If so, how is that done? And 2. How is the concrete block attached to the existing poured foundation wall?

Who's plan is this? Are you working from your own ideas, or are you working from a set of plans drawn by an architect? If so, call the architect back up and ask him/her for the answer. They HAVE to put that in the plans.

joed 12-27-2012 07:37 AM

You did not state your location. That is important because you need to know your frost lines. If you have a four foot depth for foundation you will now have also dig four feet below the foundation of the house the compensate lowering the ground level to the base of the foundation.

stadry 12-27-2012 07:43 AM

no, don't attach the new conc or blocks to existing - that's why we have isolation joint mtl for the conc & exterior wtrproofing mtls for blocks,,, you may wish to seal the adjoining joint w/proper jnt sealant & backer prior to applying wtrproofing mtl,,, during freeaing temps, i'd keep some 150w light bulbs burning to prevent frost wall damage

joecaption 12-27-2012 08:15 AM

May want to check around some local concrete supply companys. Some carry premade concrete steps that can be just dropped into place.
http://www.bilco.com/foundations/sto...roduct=1PE%2D1

joecaption 12-27-2012 09:15 AM

http://www.bilco.com/foundations/sto...roduct=1PE%2D1

Guywithskills 01-04-2013 09:39 PM

Just to affirm got it right:
cleveman
Member

Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: zentral Iowa
Posts: 523

I have done these as well, and this is how we did them. I would call the architect only if I wanted a drinking buddy. Their skills in remodel or after the fact are too often limited. Coming from one who would bid on lots of Army Corps of Engineer projects. Then when we got the job, we would draw up what we proposed to do, and they usually rubber stamped what we proposed. They were good about taking our input for non text book projects.
FYI; Field Journeymen train the architects after they are out of school... Cannot tell you how many times an inspector/engineer on the job was trained by us on how to inspect our work.


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