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-   -   Nail and wire concrete anchor (http://www.diychatroom.com/f105/nail-wire-concrete-anchor-174369/)

dftc 03-13-2013 05:35 AM

Nail and wire concrete anchor
 
I've read on other forums that a nail driven into a hole with a piece of steel wire can work as a concrete anchor.
My question is how strong is that type of fastener? For example, is it adequate to attach framing to a wall, or is it only for light-weight applications?

joecaption 03-13-2013 10:34 AM

What is it your really trying to do?
Unpressure treated wood should not be attached directly to concrete.
You should be using Tap Con's or a Ram Set.

dftc 03-13-2013 10:55 AM

I'm not necessarily trying to do anything other than to ask a question that I presume has a relatively easy answer.
Also, I'm well aware of the possible issues with untreated wood against concrete. I don't believe I mentioned anything about treated or untreated wood in my original question and I don't see that the wood type is relevant to the holding power of an anchoring method. For the sake of eliminating unnecessary variables lets say I want to anchor a stainless steel plate to concrete.

If its absolutely necessary for you to know the nature and scope of any project I might have in mind, then rest easy, I'm not planning any project with concrete at the moment.
However, I did just finish one in which I used a good number of Tapcons and pre-expanded anchors. I like the pre-expanded anchors better, but they are a pretty permanent and heavy duty option. More so than I really needed. After reading references to the nail-and-wire technique I became curious that it could have been an effective and less expensive solution.

I just wanted to know how strong that type of anchor is. If, for example, I want to put up a shelf in the unfinished portion of my basement sometime in the future, would that type of anchor be suitable?

TheEplumber 03-13-2013 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dftc (Post 1136122)
I've read on other forums that a nail driven into a hole with a piece of steel wire can work as a concrete anchor.
My question is how strong is that type of fastener? For example, is it adequate to attach framing to a wall, or is it only for light-weight applications?

I have often times seen and used this method on the job site- mainly for pining something "temporary" or that has no structural value.
Another method- more convenient, is a 1/4" hole with 2 16 pennies driven into the hole. I see this used a lot by concrete form setters

dftc 03-13-2013 11:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheEplumber

I have often times seen and used this method on the job site- mainly for pining something "temporary" or that has no structural value.
Another method- more convenient, is a 1/4" hole with 2 16 pennies driven into the hole. I see this used a lot by concrete form setters

Thanks. So I assume that this is used for temporary installations and is therefore fairly easy to remove. I imagine the form setters are intending to remove their forms at some point and don't want to break their backs doing it.

TheEplumber 03-13-2013 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dftc (Post 1136306)
Thanks. So I assume that this is used for temporary installations and is therefore fairly easy to remove. I imagine the form setters are intending to remove their forms at some point and don't want to break their backs doing it.

Yep, good for shear strength. I wouldn't use these methods when you're concerned about pulling strength.
It's simple to drill the 1/4" hole through a 2x, into the concrete and drive a couple nails into it. A few days later come back with a pry bar a pop them out.


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